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MrFrankVegas

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For fun, run the following in the terminal:

Code:
lsb_release -a

That is a nice little utility, to get the version info :)

Screenshot from 2021-10-30 09-40-18.png
 

KGIII

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Now, you can take that text and wrap it in code tags.
Code:
[code]output from command[ /code]

- except remove the space between the [ and /. in the closing tag.

Something like:

Code:
lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID:    Ubuntu
Description:    Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS
Release:    20.04
Codename:    focal

That makes it easier for folks to help. It's also faster to post. The people trying to help can highlight the text output to search for it, or to quote it, etc...
 
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MrFrankVegas

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Now, you can take that text and wrap it in code tags. output from command
Yes, then you can't see my pink terminal :) LOL

Edit - removed double opening code tab, I should know better :)
 
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KGIII

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MrFrankVegas

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Thank you everyone,

I have always been, for the most part, a Ubuntu user, I like the stability and the regular updates, plus they seem to have pretty good hardware support, but I really did not like using their modified Gnome install so for the last several years I have always kind of defaulted to Xubuntu for the majority of my Linux needs (unless I didn't need a GUI, in that case I would just use Ubuntu Server).

However, when I was setting up my gaming machine, something that I would be using daily, I did some research to see if one had an advantage over another, I tried a bunch out: Pop OS, Manjaro, Arch, Garuda, Xubuntu, and Vanilla Ubunutu, too see if there was much many changed between them, which I liked best, and what defaults they came with that would or wouldn't work for me.

(I literally just spilled a huge coffee all over my desk, I think everything is ok, it just made a huge mess :( )

Anyway, I ended up going with Ubuntu 21.04, pretty solid and I am very familiar with it, thankfully I was also able to make edits to the GUI to fit what I liked instead of the default, that I don't like much :) As a side-note, I really did like Manjaro as well, but I could not get used to the pacman installer, I thank after years of using apt, pacman is just missing tons of stuff and its really hard to switch to.

As for hardware:
Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix x470-e
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3800x
RAM: 32GB Gskill Trident Z Neo
GPU: MSI GTX 1070 ti
SSD: Samsung EVO Plus NVME SSD 1TB
Case: Case is the Corsair Crystal 570x (Not Recommended)

Ubuntu was able to get all of the drivers and everything worked out of the box with no issues. Grabbed the GPU driver from the Ubuntu Extras and it auto-installed no problem.

The only caveats are: Razer Keyboard and Mouse (I don't care about the RGB, but I do miss the control software or macro keys, especially the ones on my Razer Trinity Mouse); and my AVerMedia 4k PCIe Capture card, I don't really use this much anymore, so it might just be coming out. I have not done much research on these though and as more gamers join the Linux world I expect that there is probably a solution out there.

Anyway, hope you all have an amazing day :)

-Frank
hey frank, i also want to install linux on my asus tuf but i have few doubts about it, whether i will be able to use all my asus softwares like my asus, armory crate and etc, also whether there will be Nvidia softwares or not, and which will be the best linux distro for me, i am in college, a programmer, wants a beautiful and powerful distro with good performance and a distro on which i can perform all basic things that were in windows....thanks and waiting for your response
 

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hey frank, i also want to install linux on my asus tuf but i have few doubts about it, whether i will be able to use all my asus softwares like my asus, armory crate and etc, also whether there will be Nvidia softwares or not, and which will be the best linux distro for me, i am in college, a programmer, wants a beautiful and powerful distro with good performance and a distro on which i can perform all basic things that were in windows....thanks and waiting for your response
Best way to figure out which distro may meat your needs is to try a few in live mode. Most major distros offer live USBs .isos so you can try before you install. I doubtful that the Asus Software will work on any of them though because more than likely they are all written for Windows. Good luck on your search. KGILL has a nice tip here
and you might profit from a read of this
 

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hey frank, i also want to install linux on my asus tuf but i have few doubts about it, whether i will be able to use all my asus softwares like my asus, armory crate and etc, also whether there will be Nvidia softwares or not, and which will be the best linux distro for me, i am in college, a programmer, wants a beautiful and powerful distro with good performance and a distro on which i can perform all basic things that were in windows....thanks and waiting for your response
Welcome to the forums
Linux uses its own drivers and some proprietary drivers and will work out of the box on around 90% of hardware, when you install, most of the distributions will ask if you wish to install non-free/propriety drivers just tick the box and enter to say yes the Nvida may take a bit of effort to install the correct drivers, but there are plenty of members who can talk you through it,
WHAT is the exact model number of your acer ?

Bwiz
 
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hey frank, i also want to install linux on my asus tuf but i have few doubts about it, whether i will be able to use all my asus softwares like my asus, armory crate and etc, also whether there will be Nvidia softwares or not, and which will be the best linux distro for me, i am in college, a programmer, wants a beautiful and powerful distro with good performance and a distro on which i can perform all basic things that were in windows....thanks and waiting for your response

As said by @brickwizard in his message, when installing any Linux distro they do not use the drivers and software from the manufacturer, but in a significant number of cases there are drivers provided by the Linux distro or the community that get things working for the most part. So in my case, I tried several distros the day I started this project and all of them were able to get me up and running for the most bart just using the normal Linux install process, then I would need to manually install the GPU driver (nVidia). As for some of the ancillary items, you may need some open-source software or some items might just not work, for instance if you want to control the RGB on the hardware you can get OpenRGB (which is kind of crap, but it works), or if you want to edit the keyboard or macro keys on a keyboard or mouse, there is key-mapping software that lets you manage those. I would say, because of this, you probably get about 80-90% of the functionality of your hardware (maybe lower on gaming hardware) that you would using the original, manufacturer software. That being said, in my experience both Razer and Asus make really crappy software so its not really much of a loss.

As for distro choice, I typically go so Ubuntu variant because its what I know, its been around forever, and its kind of the gold standard for easy of use and hardware support, but I would encourage you to try out a few, just be prepared to wipe your machine a few times. Also before you nuke your Windows install, you will probably want to create a Windows 10 install drive (using the Windows USB Creator tool) and hang on to it in case you need to go back, I think they changed something recently because none of the open tools for creating bootable Windows 10 USBs seem to work anymore.

Good luck with your project :)

-Frank
 

KGIII

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Aka King George the third.

I'm pretty sure I did a thread about the origin of your username. Man, that seems like a long time ago. I'm sure it's in there somewhere if someone wants to weed through my posting history. I am way too lazy for that.
 

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George iii, known as Mad also farmer George
so I take it your a Farmer KG
 

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As said by @brickwizard in his message, when installing any Linux distro they do not use the drivers and software from the manufacturer, but in a significant number of cases there are drivers provided by the Linux distro or the community that get things working for the most part. So in my case, I tried several distros the day I started this project and all of them were able to get me up and running for the most bart just using the normal Linux install process, then I would need to manually install the GPU driver (nVidia). As for some of the ancillary items, you may need some open-source software or some items might just not work, for instance if you want to control the RGB on the hardware you can get OpenRGB (which is kind of crap, but it works), or if you want to edit the keyboard or macro keys on a keyboard or mouse, there is key-mapping software that lets you manage those. I would say, because of this, you probably get about 80-90% of the functionality of your hardware (maybe lower on gaming hardware) that you would using the original, manufacturer software. That being said, in my experience both Razer and Asus make really crappy software so its not really much of a loss.

As for distro choice, I typically go so Ubuntu variant because its what I know, its been around forever, and its kind of the gold standard for easy of use and hardware support, but I would encourage you to try out a few, just be prepared to wipe your machine a few times. Also before you nuke your Windows install, you will probably want to create a Windows 10 install drive (using the Windows USB Creator tool) and hang on to it in case you need to go back, I think they changed something recently because none of the open tools for creating bootable Windows 10 USBs seem to work anymore.

Good luck with your project :)

-Frank
Thanks for your suggestion it helped a lot man, i appreciate your efforts.
 
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