General questions on software downloading.

ImOverThere

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Alright so I need to build another password thief to get into my moms computer. But my big question is the software I used I'm not entirely sure if I can download it with Linux as my new OS. I'm hoping I'm making a big fuss out of nothing but I would rather be safe than create a massive headache for myself. The programs I use are
1.MessenPass
2.IE PassView
3.PSPV (Protected storage pass view)
4.Password fox
and
5. ChromePass

No this is not used for illegal activities except for once to spam a buddies computer with gay porn for being a dick and losing my external hard drive. Yes it was hilarious. waiting for yalls replys. I may not respond very quickly as its my birthday and my family is taking me out to go race at a local go kart track today.
 


atanere

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So, first... Happy Birthday! :D:D:D

You will soon realize (like now) that Linux is very different from Windows, and it is not designed to run Windows software. If it was, well, then... it would be Windows! :eek: There is a Linux project called Wine (along with an offshoot program called PlayOnLinux that uses Wine) that attempts to provide the ability to install and run Windows software within Linux. It has varying degrees of success. Some things actually work well, some will not install at all, and some will install but will perform poorly or have buggy behavior.

Because of Wine's complexity and frequent level of failure, I would not recommend it to a new Linux user like yourself. You will have plenty of frustration already as you transition to learn Linux and these differences from Windows without trying to turn Linux into Windows. You might try Wine a little later as you get more experienced, and if you can find no substitute software to replace Windows programs that you have become used to, but remember that you may be disappointed trying to do this.

Almost any task you can do with Windows software, you can do with native Linux software. Make Google your best friend to help you find the tools you need... a quick search found this link that may help to recover lost passwords. I've never tried any password recovery, but there is a tool called chntpw (bundled with some Linux rescue CD's) that will let you change a Windows user's password, including the Administrator. chntpw may only work through Windows 7 versions, but this page can give you more information about it, and about other methods of resetting the Windows password in Windows 8, Windows 10, and on Surface Pro or Surface Book computers.

Since it seems that you may often have password issues, I would highly recommend a password manager, such as KeePass to help you and your mom securely store your passwords and always have them available to you. :cool::D

Cheers
 

Gordon Sweet

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I have been using Mint for awhile on a spare old Desktop only to discover MS say it will not run Skype. Can you sugest a linux that will handle Skype please. Our club at http://herc-hastings.org.uk/ which I am Chairman uses Sktpe for all committee meetings. If I can sometimes use the router at the blind centre where we hold our meetings I also try to use Skype to allow a few housebaound members to join in.
 

atanere

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I have been using Mint for awhile on a spare old Desktop only to discover MS say it will not run Skype. Can you sugest a linux that will handle Skype please.
Hi Gordon, and welcome to the forum! Microsoft has become very Linux-friendly lately (which kind of scares me).... so not sure what you've read that says Skype will not work. They make a special version just for Linux! See this page to download the "DEB" version that should work on your Linux Mint (as long as you meet the other system requirements).

If you need any further assistance, please open up your own thread where we can assist you better. Thanks!
 

Bayou Bengal

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You can download Skype for Linux, latest version, right from the Software Manager. Be warned that they save everything. Your video sessions and what you might type in chat. It's in the EULA. Having said that, I have tested it with my daughter, and it works quite well, but I find Wired works even better. That's as far as video and audio are concerned.
 

Gordon Sweet

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I see here somewhere doubts expressed as to being able to use Wine to run some Windows software. If you care to visit my site at http://www.sigord.co.uk/ you will see for years ( When I was younger but now 83 ) I tinkerd with various BASIC software writing simple software available for free. Some run up to point with wine under Mint and the Aussie Linux I forget the name.

I could upload a collection for any to download on my site if I can find them again now I am in this Windows 10.
 

CptCharis

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Can I have a question to everybody?
Bcz I haven't understand so far.
Can you compile a program with many different ways?
If not , waht is the reason of compliling?
 

Gordon Sweet

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Strange question for years I wrote and compiled freeware porgrams ( or apps now ) becuse I wanted a program that did just what I wanted and say not what MS thought we should have.
 

CptCharis

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Strange question for years I wrote and compiled freeware porgrams ( or apps now ) becuse I wanted a program that did just what I wanted and say not what MS thought we should have.
Can you a little more specific dear Sir.
I'm not a developer, I'm an middle age guy who try to cover the lost years. :D

What I can find in wed says more or less the same things.
Download the source code, extract it, run "./configuration", run "make" and program is ready for use.
Where is your personal touch in all this?
 
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JasKinasis

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Can I have a question to everybody?
Bcz I haven't understand so far.
Can you compile a program with many different ways?
If not , waht is the reason of compliling?
This thread seems to be veering wildly away from the original topic, but in answer to your questions:

In a more general sense - the point of compiling is to convert a programs source code from a human readable format (e.g. C, or C++ etc), to machine-code instructions that the computer can understand and execute.

re: Can you compile with many different ways?
I'm not sure exactly what you mean here, but assuming you mean something like:
"Are there different ways to compile programs?"
or
"Can a program be compiled using a different compiler, or a different build-system?"

That would depend on a number of different factors:
- The project in question,
- It's complexity,
- How its build system is set up by the developers,
- How many options the build system affords the user,
- The compilers that are supported
- The different architectures it targets
etc. etc.

Many free-software projects are set up to only use the GNU build system (autotools and make). Likewise, there are some that only support cmake, or qmake, or boost::jam, or apache ant.

Some projects even have their build system set up to support cross-compilation (where you can do things like build a Windows executable, or an ARM executable for your raspberry pi from your Linux environment)

Over the years I have also seen one or two cross-platform projects that provide support for several different build-systems (GNU make, CMake etc) AND several different compilers AND provide projects/solutions for several IDE's like Codeblocks, eclipse, xcode, Borland/embarcadero and Visual Studio - so that people who prefer working in an IDE can build the program too. Which offers a lot of flexibility and allows users to be able to build the software using their preferred method.

But supporting multiple build-systems is a huge maintenence burden for developers. So many software projects only choose one cross-platform build-system and anybody who wants to build the program themselves just has to download the relevant software to do so.

Also, sometimes developers will set-up the build system to provide optional program features that you can enable or disable at compile time. This is often done by passing parameters to the build scripts, or adding/changing settings in some of the configuration scripts.

If you disable/exclude features at compile time, then those pieces of functionality will not be available in the final executable. In order to re-enable them, you would have to enable them in the configuration scripts and then re-build the program again.

The Linux kernel is a prime example of this. The Linux kernel has a LOT of optional modules and features that can be enabled/disabled at compile time.

Generally speaking - by default - All distros usually enable a LOT of modules and features in order for their kernel to run on a wide range of motherboards, with different wireless cards, or other components. But some people like to tinker with the kernel on their PC's and build their own custom version to tune it to their specific hardware - removing all unnecessary modules and features. Or to remove conflicts, or to add support for newer hardware that is not supported in their installed distros current kernel.

Going back to the idea of different ways of compiling a program - to summarize - it ultimately depends on how the developers have set up their build-system. Some projects can be compiled in a number of different ways, others can only be compiled one way!

What I can find in wed says more or less the same things.
Download the source code, extract it, run "./configuration", run "make" and program is ready for use.
Where is your personal touch in all this?
As previously mentioned, GNU make (and the rest of autotools) is just one build-system and it is used by a lot of free software projects. But there are also a lot of projects that use other build-systems like cmake or boosts 'jam', or qmake (QT's build system), or apache ant etc..

BTW: Another time when you might want to compile and build a program yourself:

On very rare occasions, you might install a software package from your distro that has a particular feature disabled and you may find that you need to manually build and install the program yourself to re-enable that functionality.

Generally speaking, the package maintainers for most distros build their packages with most of the optional, compile-time features enabled. But sometimes certain optional parts are disabled.
(perhaps it has an optional feature that is deprecated, considered obsolete, or introduces a potential security hole)

If you need to be able to use that disabled functionality, you won't be able to access it using the version you installed from your package manager. In which case, manually building and installing is your only option.

This situation only ever happened to me once - many years ago. I forget exactly which package it was - it was a long time ago. I was running Ubuntu on one of my ancient laptops and there was a program that had a feature I needed to be able to use. But it was unavailable because the version in the repo had been built with that functionality disabled. So I had to manually build and install from source to re-enable the required functionality.

For the life of me, I can't remember what package it was! But I do remember that it took a lot of research to find out why the functionality was unavailable and to work out what I needed to do to fix the issue!

Again, it's an extremely rare event - it's only happened to me once in all the years I've been using Linux. But it is something that could happen again in the future!
 
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CptCharis

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Hello @JasKinasis and thank you for your time to explain to me.

You r known for your long & well explained threads.

Of course, I put this question on wrong thread but I made a link in the correct one. :D.

I have to admit that I didn’t understand the most of what are you saying. :rolleyes:

But I understand that in my case the way of compiling I found in web is more than enough.

Anyway, with my question , can you compile a program with different ways , I mean if you can make a program to do different things or to do only specific thing that probably you need.

Thanks again for your time.
 


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