Formatting USB to FAT32

SpongebobFan1994

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I'm trying to burn an ISO of PrimeOS, and after completing some research on how to do that in Linux, I came across a tutorial on LifeWire (https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-burn-iso-to-usb-in-linux-4588767), and it recommended using UNetBootin. I set up the program, but then was told I needed to format the USB to FAT32, which led me to finding another tutorial from LinuxHint showing me how to do that in Terminal (https://linuxhint.com/format-usb-drive-linux/). While doing that just now, I came across an issue where I copy and pasted
Code:
sudo parted /dev/sdb --script -- mkpart primary fat32 1MiB 100%
and was told
Code:
Error: You requested a partition from 1049kB to 160GB (sectors 2048..312581807). The closest location we can manage is 1048kB to 1048kB (sectors 2047..2047).
I don't know what I did wrong.
 


KGIII

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UNetBootIn has had issues lately. You can use Balena Etcher to accomplish the same thing (unless you want persistence) and it will take care of the formatting all by itself.

You can also try a GUI app. Your distro probably has a 'disk management' utility, such as GParted. You can just format the drive in that.
 

Condobloke

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GParted is cool.

Just be sure you format the correct drive !

There is a drop down menu/window in the top right hand corner
 

KGIII

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It may well be defective. Formatting it shouldn't brick it, at least not while it is new.

I'd simply return it as defective.

Though, before you do, I have a complicated link that I share when this happens. (It happens often enough for me to have it bookmarked and shared many times.)

 

SpongebobFan1994

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It may well be defective. Formatting it shouldn't brick it, at least not while it is new.

I'd simply return it as defective.

Though, before you do, I have a complicated link that I share when this happens. (It happens often enough for me to have it bookmarked and shared many times.)

I could always contact SeaGate and see if they'll send me a replacement
 

Tolkem

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I'm trying to burn an ISO of PrimeOS, and after completing some research on how to do that in Linux, I came across a tutorial on LifeWire (https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-burn-iso-to-usb-in-linux-4588767), and it recommended using UNetBootin. I set up the program, but then was told I needed to format the USB to FAT32, which led me to finding another tutorial from LinuxHint showing me how to do that in Terminal (https://linuxhint.com/format-usb-drive-linux/). While doing that just now, I came across an issue where I copy and pasted
Code:
sudo parted /dev/sdb --script -- mkpart primary fat32 1MiB 100%
and was told
Code:
Error: You requested a partition from 1049kB to 160GB (sectors 2048..312581807). The closest location we can manage is 1048kB to 1048kB (sectors 2047..2047).
I don't know what I did wrong.
What you're doing wrong is following the examples by the letter, which are clearly just that; examples made with other hardware different from yours; did you make sure the correct device was /dev/sdb ? Also, you've to be more careful when copying/pasting commands from the web, and make sure they correspond with your particular case, i.e. your device might have been something else other than /sdb thus you might have damaged your disk or any other matching that description. Another problem is that your device is bigger/larger than the one used in the example, so again, you had to accommodate that to your specific case. You seriously need to learn and work on this to avoid serious trouble in the future, because I've seen you shown the same behavior over and over across several of your posts, and I'm saying this as friendly advice. :)
 

SpongebobFan1994

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@Tolkem If I didn't have a fallout with one of my friends, I would've asked him to come over and help me with this, and I wouldn't have this many issues. While I obviously won't go into major details, me having a tendency to stick my foot in my mouth is why he decided to break it off with me.
 

Tolkem

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@SpongebobFan1994 You just need to take some minutes a day to clarify your understanding in these kind of things. For example, do this exercise:
1. With no USB devices connected to your machine, open a terminal and run
Code:
lsblk
copy/paste the output to a text file and as a title use something like No USBs.
2. Connect 1 or more USB devices to your machine and run the same command again, and copy/paste the output to the same text file and as a title With USBs.
3. Look for the differences, you'll notice that in the 2nd output, With USBs there is 1 or more new devices that didn't show up in the No USBs output. See? It's easy. You just have to find your own way around it, by doing exercises like this one with things you might not yet have quite clear how they work, how to read or understand.
ksnip_20210511-152416.png

If you look at the picture, you'll notice that in the With USBs column, two new devices appear:
/sdb and /sdc .
 

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