Elementary OS on Acer Spin 1

Djarin

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I am using the Live installer and allowing it to automatically install (do everything). I had to use ubiquity -b because the installer will crash about 90% through due to Grub from what I gather. However, using ubiquity -b starts the standard installer and does the exact same process of automatic install as not using it.
 


Djarin

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Ok, I've tried several distros like Fedora, Zorin, Solus, another I don't recall. So far, out of all of these Zorin Core allows me to install but without Grub. And unlike the other distros, I've found the Zorin EFI and can select it on secure boot. However, it will not start telling me that a boot system or something is missing.

I've come to read that this is a problem with the processor this machine uses. The Intel N4200 series. I found this: https://medium.com/@pawitp/grub-2-issue-on-intel-n4200-97c12d4db8af But when I try to get access to the EFI folder, it just won't open in GParted.

*Edit*
I assumed by reading the above link that stock Ubuntu would function "out of the box". However, upon installation I'm still having problems with Grub.

See attached photo:
 

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jglen490

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I see. The installer should be installing the Grub boot files to the EFI partition on /dev/mmcblk1p1. It looks like it is trying to install the files to /dev/mmcblk1, which is the MBR of the MMC and not the EFI partition. The installer should have a prompt to the Grub load location, which you can change to the correct location for the EFI partition.

I think the problem is that the installer automatically assumes the wrong location, but you should be able to correct that assumption.
 

Djarin

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I don't see anything like that during EOS setup. I can choose folders, and I've tried during install by choosing "Other". But I get a message that no root or boot (don't recall which) isn't set up and that I need to do that. (Something I don't know how to do.)
 

jglen490

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I have some commitments this morning, but this afternoon I will download EOS (probably the latest version, and install it on an extra drive that I have in my spare parts drawer. I will then go through the installer, take notes, and try to take some pics of the screens.

When that happens, and assuming I'm successful, I'll upload a file here with the notes and we can go from there. There will, of course be some naming differences. My PC does not have an MMC and the install will go to an external USB drive, but everything else should be correct - step-by-step.

With our time differences, you may not see the results until your tomorrow.
 

Djarin

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I want to thank you all for your support. I appreciate it. I know Linux can be installed on this Acer, but unfortunately it's beyond my capabilities. So instead of wasting your time any further, I thought I'd just let you know that I've reinstalled Windows and will be running that.

Thank you again, jglen490 and wizardfromoz.
 

wizardfromoz

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@Djarin - understand your reluctance.

If I may suggest, keep up your Membership with us, as you also have the Dell?

I have got to a point where on a spare machine I have run Timeshift snapshots on the 3 Distros which were on it, and am about to embark on installing EOS using ubiquity -b and work from there.

If I learn something of significance - we keep Threads open here, so I will return here and post my findings.

Good luck with your computer adventures :)

BTW thanks @jglen490 for all your assistance.

Wizard
 

wizardfromoz

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Great, mate :cool:

If you get a chance, swing over to Member Introductions

https://linux.org/forums/member-introductions.141/

and say Hi and tell us a bit more of the Djarin story and meet a few more of The Gang :)

We are a diverse lot, from all around the globe, and during these COVID times, it's nice to be able to make new friends with shared interests, and without the health risks.

Also in Off Topic, we have my Rock Roxx and Arochester's Classical Music thread.

See you soon, I hope

Chris
 

jglen490

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I'm sorry that you have become discouraged, maybe try some other time.

I apologize for being so late, but while I was trying to see what EOS was doing, I manged to badly mess up my desktop. Not sure how it happened, but I had to re-set my original UEFI/BIOS settings, including a redo of the boot preferences list. But that's back to straight UEFI, Secure boot disabled, and SATA to AHCI, and while I was "under the hood" a BIOS update. I also had to reinstall my Kubuntu 20.04.1 LTS. Fortunately, none of the data on the separate drive containing /home was affected. So a re-install, update to current security and patches, and a few software removal/installs - and all is well.

Not that it will help now, but I was going to relay that the Debian (and downstream distros) installer has an 8 step process:
Language, Keyboard, Wireless, Software Install Preferences (Normal, Minimal, Install 3rd Party), Disk Setup ( I always recommend and do Manual) with partition dialog boxes and bootloader selection for either the efi partition or the MBR, Timezone, User Information, and then the Install. If the user chooses to use the default disk setup process, then there is no user interaction with partitions, that's why I recommend and do the Manual partition option - always.

I hope to "see" you again sometime!
 

wizardfromoz

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BTW thanks @jglen490 for all your assistance.
Phew :) Glad you got that sorted, @jglen490

Now for the drum roll.

Hey, Djarin, guess what? I boo-booed.

I love it when I make a mistake (does that sound weird? Welcome to Wizard's life o_Oo_O:eek:)

... because I learn from it, and try not to make the same mistake more than about (arbitrary figure) 3 times, for example marriages.

I don't mind egg on face, because I love the taste of eggs.

So the upshot of it is, that I was mistaken about what

ubiquity -b

does, at least in the case of EOS, and I will have to investigate further with a couple more distros.

I try to minimise my risk of mistakes, often, by trying to duplicate the circumstances of the Member/user, and then be confident of recommending a solution.

In the case of ubiquity -b, I knew of it for years, but had not actually had occasion to try it.

That is why I recommended it to you as a solution to getting EOS up and running, given your install was falling over at the Grub install part.

As mentioned earlier

I have got to a point where on a spare machine I have run Timeshift snapshots on the 3 Distros which were on it, and am about to embark on installing EOS using ubiquity -b and work from there.
I have now completed that exercise and used ubiquity -b to install EOS as the sole OS on that machine.

It works fine, and I have Grub installed and a Grub Menu, now.

If you want to try it with the Acer again, and you are under no obligation or pressure to do so, just sing out and I'll put it together for you.

Other than that, I can wait a day or 3, then put the details in this Thread, or I can make a separate How To on it for others, but I would rather test it with a few more Distros to be accurate in that regard.

Let us know your choice.

Cheers

Wizard
 

wizardfromoz

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BTW my regrets that it has taken us to nearly 3 pages to get this outcome, where I might have solved it on page 1 had I taken the time to reorganise the Toshiba as I have now done. You have been a wonderfully "good sport" all the way through :)
 

Djarin

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I think I'll pass doing it on the Acer. I've read that the processor can make Linux install difficult, primarily due to the fact that it messes with Grub. But if you have an idea that you think will work, I'd like to give it a go. I did try installing Ubuntu with the fork of WubiUEFI. That didn't work, had issues with Grub there, too.
 

wizardfromoz

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That's fine, Djarin :)

I should have said it is likely that Grub was there all the time (under ubiquity -b method), we just had to find it and tweak it.

But I also want to check with you that yu are not labouring under a misapprehension.

Grub aka GRUB is the GRand Universal Bootloader. It is what boots very many Linuxes (there are other bootloaders available for example rEFInd), and if we want to change our startup options and many other parts of the configuration, we need to be able to access it.

The Grub Menu is a menu we can get after the initial startup protocols have been completed, and allows us to choose what OS we boot, which could be Linux vs Windows (dual-boot) or one Linux and another (multibooting, such as I do with 56 of the suckers).

If your desktop/laptop has only the one OS, a Linux Distro, the grub menu is hidden by default, but can be revealed both temporarily and permanently, if you have the need/desire.

So when you said that EOS was up and running, we just need to determine what elements you felt were missing in the installed OS.

Cheers

Wiz
 


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