Dual Boot (Ubuntu and Win 10) Mounting Drive Problems

333pwn

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Seems to be a consensus to check for ntfs-3g. I would guess Ubuntu includes that by default, but open up a terminal and confirm by:
Code:
which ntfs-3g
I'm using Ubuntu-based Zorin, and I find it installed in /bin.
Thank you very much everyone and I apologize that Im responding so late. First, @Tolkem and @wizardfromoz I believe I had winows on sdd (a sata ssd) and sdc (a laptop hard dive), both were in a laptop before and I think i did not format them correctly, just deleted the files, which would leave the Windows files still on them, not sure if this helps at all. My local drive in windows was definitely sdd though, which made me believe that that was also the boot drive, or can they be seperate?
@f33dm3bits Im really sorry but I dont understand your instructions, Im a new Linux user, whats efi?
@stan Thanks for the help, when I run "which ntfs-3g" I get which ntfs-3g, also im almost certain that sdd is NOT a nvme, I pealed the sticker off but its not as fast as a nvme should be and it was the cheepest one I could find at the time.
Ill try unplugging my Linux drive and see what happens.
 


stan

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when I run "which ntfs-3g" I get which ntfs-3g
Meaning you get no output? You aren't using the quotes, are you? Just which ntfs-3g in your terminal. It will either show nothing, or it will show a path to the file. If there is no output, you'll need to install it with sudo apt install ntfs-3g.

OK on not being a NVMe... thanks for checking that. If unplugging the Linux drive does not give you Windows, that's okay... it was just a hunch that it might work, but I'm far from certain. So after testing that, you can plug it back in and we'll look at your video and the instructions it provided for editing your /etc/rc.local file.
 
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333pwn

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Meaning you get no output? You aren't using the quotes, are you? Just which ntfs-3g in your terminal. It will either show nothing, or it will show a path to the file. If there is no output, you'll need to install it with sudo apt install ntfs-3g.

OK on not being a NVMe... thanks for checking that. If unplugging the Linux drive does not give you Windows, that's okay... it was just a hunch that it might work, but I'm far from certain. So after testing that, you can plug it back in and we'll look at your video and the instructions it provided for editing your /etc/rc.local file.
No, sorry made a mistake, when I run which ntfs-3g i get
"/usr/bin/ntfs-3g"
so it should be installed.
Unplugging did not work, unfortunately, what should I do from now?
 

Tolkem

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I believe I had winows on sdd (a sata ssd) and sdc (a laptop hard dive)
I took a second look at your screenshots just in case I was wrong and confirmed that I wasn't. In screenshot 1, sdd I see



I have Windows 7 installed alongside Debian 11 and openSUSE 15.2



while my setup is a lot different from yours, it doesn't change the fact that a NTFS partition should exist somewhere for windows to work, and there's one in /dev/sdc3 marked as Basic data partition which means that's where Windows resides



Another problem I see, is that you have 2 EFI partitions, and that's not right, there should be only one. I think you have to make a full reinstall to ensure everything works as expected, however, I haven't done this using 2 different disks so I can't give any advice but someone else here might. That being said, I do know 2 things:
1. Only one EFI partition must be used.
2. When installing Linux, use the existing EFI partition and mount it in /boot/EFI.
Also, I think GRUB must be installed in the same disk where Windows is installed, however, like I said before, I've no experience dealing with 2 disk so I might be wrong.
 
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333pwn

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I took a second look at your screenshots just in case I was wrong and confirmed that I wasn't. In screenshot 1, sdd I see



I have Windows 7 installed alongside Debian 11 and openSUSE 15.2



while my setup is a lot different from yours, it doesn't change the fact that a NTFS partition should exist somewhere for windows to work, and there's one in /dev/sdc3 marked as Basic data partition which means that's where Windows resides



Another problem I see, is that you have 2 EFI partitions, and that's not right, there should be only one. I think you have to make a full reinstall to ensure everything works as expected, however, I haven't done this using 2 different disks so I can't give any advice but someone else here might.
thanks so much, Im thinking of just installing winows on another drive or the same one as linux, I hope that through windows I will be able to access drive sdd.
 

stan

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while my setup is a lot different from yours, it doesn't change the fact that a NTFS partition should exist somewhere for windows to work, and there's one in /dev/sdc3 marked as Basic data partition which means that's where Windows resides
@Tolkem, might the LDM (Logical Disk Manager) be "masking" that the drives are NTFS? I'm not familiar with this (it's usually used for RAID on Windows systems).... but I wonder about LVM in Linux, and if it would similarly "mask" ext4 or other filesystem? I don't use LVM either, so just curious.

It's clear that Gparted is not recognizing what LDM is doing though. But the OP's video instructions say this should be accessible from Linux using ldmtool.
 
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stan

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thanks so much, Im thinking of just installing winows on another drive or the same one as linux, I hope that through windows I will be able to access drive sdd.
Are there files on sdd that you absolutely need to recover?
 

Tolkem

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thanks so much, Im thinking of just installing winows on another drive or the same one as linux, I hope that through windows I will be able to access drive sdd.
Boot Ubuntu from a USB, and you should be able to access all of your drives and partitions.
 

Tolkem

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@Tolkem, might the LDM (Logical Disk Manager) be "masking" that the drives are NTFS? I'm not familiar with this (it's usually used for RAID on Windows systems).... but I wonder about LVM in Linux, and if it would similarly "mask" ext4 or other filesystem? I don't use LVM either, so just curious.
I've no idea. Never used it nor LVM.

EDIT: @stan @333pwn did a quick search on LDM and found this https://www.ntfs.com/ldm.htm there's an interesting part which reads
Limitations of Windows
Windows has some limitations in itself. The following is a list of limitations given by Windows operating systems:


  1. Microsoft does not support Dynamic Disks on laptops, removable disks, USB's or FireWire interfaces.
  2. Dynamic and Basic Volumes cannot be mixed on a disk. Basic Disks can be converted to Dynamic, but in order to convert Dynamic back to Basic, you would need to remove all of the Dynamic Volumes first.
  3. After upgrading to a Dynamic Disk, partitions will show up as free space after the conversion, with the exception of NTFS and FAT.
  4. LDM does not require a DOS-style partition, but there will still be one to prevent legacy applications from thinking there is free space on the disk when there isn't. It is also needed to boot Windows, as the boot code needs the operating system to be in a primary partition.
  5. You cannot extend your boot volume in any way because it is reliant on simple BIOS calls.
  6. You are not able to install Windows onto a disk with partitions because it requires a primary partition.
  7. NTFS volumes can only be resized dynamically through Windows.
Like I said, I've no experience with this since I've never used it, but this might just be the root of all this, and most particularly numbers 1 and 6. Check that info out and do your research before attempting to do this again, thus to avoid the same situation from happening.
 
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stan

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I've no idea. Never used it nor LVM.
Me too. Wikipedia has an article about it... it's a very old (now deprecated) technology, going all the way back to Windows XP. But the article doesn't seem to specify (from what I can tell quickly) that it uses NTFS, or even FAT32 filesystems.

The ldmtool (shown in the video) may be the only way to get into that drive with Linux.

Or maybe find a way to boot direct into Windows so the OP can recover his files.

Unplugging the Linux drive did not work to boot into Windows.

By the way, how did that work out? Any errors? Or were you left at at grub> or grub rescue> prompt? What happened when removing the Linux drive?
 

333pwn

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Me too. Wikipedia has an article about it... it's a very old (now deprecated) technology, going all the way back to Windows XP. But the article doesn't seem to specify (from what I can tell quickly) that it uses NTFS, or even FAT32 filesystems.

The ldmtool (shown in the video) may be the only way to get into that drive with Linux.

Or maybe find a way to boot direct into Windows so the OP can recover his files.

Unplugging the Linux drive did not work to boot into Windows.

By the way, how did that work out? Any errors? Or were you left at at grub> or grub rescue> prompt? What happened when removing the Linux drive?
Yeah been trying to use ldmtool but no luck. When I unplugged I just got a screen that told me that no boot media was detected, but not grub. Nothing at all, Im trying to get into a new installation of windows since Ubuntu didn't work.
 

Tolkem

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This is complicated stuff, only to be done by experienced users who know exactly what they're doing. Check this stuff out:

 

stan

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Well, according to this https://www.ntfs.com/ldm.htm and unless I missed it, file system should still appear as NTFS.
The OP's video instructions (here) are using Gnome Disks in Ubuntu... it shows the partiton as "unknown" just like Gparted. Yet ldmtool is able to work in the video. This LDM thing is definitely trouble here.

@333pwn, have you changed your /etc/rc.local file to correct "sdd" to "sdd3" yet? And followed all of the video instructions CAREFULLY... and EXACTLY? I would carefully start at the beginning of that video and try again from there before installing another copy of Windows and making this problem even more complicated than it is already.
 

Tolkem

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stan

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This is complicated stuff, only to be done by experienced users who know exactly what they're doing.
But @333pwn doesn't even know how he got LDM.

From post #13: "Im not sure why its LDM, ive been into computers for a while too but always windows, recently changed to linux and i only now found out its LDM, it wasint configured like this by me."

This may not end well. :oops:
 

333pwn

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But @333pwn doesn't even know how he got LDM.

From post #13: "Im not sure why its LDM, ive been into computers for a while too but always windows, recently changed to linux and i only now found out its LDM, it wasint configured like this by me."

This may not end well. :oops:
yeah not sure why I have its LDM to be honest, never configured it to be such
 
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