Distro based on Debian-sid



f33dm3bits

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irradiot

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window manager is no problem; you use it as an alternative though; you can switch easily to your main desktop
but i wouldn't recommend any either; it's for conserving computing power
 

gvisoc

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Without recommending anything, it's worth noting that debian testing and sid are not considered rolling releases by debian, though they may seem that way because they are updatable and avail themselves of very recent software. The reality however is that neither testing nor sid versions receive security updates from the debian security team, which means that any security that does come their way depends on that supplied by the devs whose programs are being added to those which are available. They may or may not provide security code, and may or may not be experts with it. Debian stable on the other hand gets the formal security updates. An authentic rolling release one might expect does have the latest and most appropriate security updates accompanying the latest software it is offering. Having considered all of that, my own experience with debian testing is that it can be treated similarly to a rolling release, but it does blip every now and then.
Agree to all just with one comment: Debian Testing (or "next-stable"), indeed does receive security updates, and so do the backports from it (see https://backports.debian.org)

Indeed, if you install a weekly build ISO of the next-stable, you'll see security repositories in apt-sources.

The point is whether or not we can assume that the security updates will flow with the same thoroughness (frequency, quality and scope --all packages?) than for the stable release. I reckon we should think it's going to be less secure than debian stable.

Adding some warnings to sid:
  • Sid is not receiving security updates from Debian team, but from each package maintainers. This de-centralised management of security patches can lead to broken dependnecies.
  • For the above reasons, rhe idea of sid, is not to be installed directly on your computer. Its packages are meant to be used in a chroot environment as an experiment, or in order to work in the next release, isolating what you pull from sid from the rest of your system in order to not break it.
 

SlowCoder

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Hello everyone, Have a great day :D
I have a friend who was a windows user ,the past week I have told him about Linux and he is really impressed And agreed to install it on his old laptop. He has some demands
*He needs all the new updates without waiting for them(rolling-release)
*it should be based on Debian/Ubuntu
His laptop is low end with 2GB ram
Can you guys tell me a distro based on Debian-sid (Debian rolling) for low-end laptops for daily use? It would be a great help.
I find it interesting that this friend is a brand new Linux user, but has some very specific demands that most people won't understand until they've used Linux for quite a while? New users likely won't understand what a rolling release is, or the benefits/consequences of using a Debian derivative over, say RHEL or Arch. Also, the fact that they're worried about having the very newest, possibly unstable versions over a stable version ... inappropriate for a new user. Later, the mention of Parrot ... not a new user distro.
 

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kc1di

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With only 2 GB ram he/she is not going to get the very latest software to run with any constancy on that machine. AntiX is a good choice though. It will take some learning to get used to it. But it presents one of the best alternatives. Debian based and fairly light on resources. Good luck.
 
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Adithyansm

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I find it interesting that this friend is a brand new Linux user, but has some very specific demands that most people won't understand until they've used Linux for quite a while?
I told him what a rolling release is and what ubuntu is.
Temporarily he just landed in manjaro xfce (not ubuntu based I know )
He and I had a hard time learning the package management because I don't Use arch and don't know much about Pacman for now he is installing packages using the pamac
 

kc1di

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Adithyansm

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That should work for him But with 2gb ram it's not going to be speedy thing.
He is not using it for the heavy tasks (I guess, because he has another good high-end PC for heavy work. I think he is using this laptop to do light tasks while travelling)
 

f33dm3bits

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He is not using it for the heavy tasks (I guess, because he has another good high-end PC for heavy work. I think he is using this laptop to do light tasks while travelling)
Most web-browsers can get high in ram usage as well I have found especially when playing Youtube videos and when a lot of tabs are opened.
 

SlowCoder

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I told him what a rolling release is and what ubuntu is.
Temporarily he just landed in manjaro xfce (not ubuntu based I know )
He and I had a hard time learning the package management because I don't Use arch and don't know much about Pacman for now he is installing packages using the pamac
Ok. So, just because a distro is rolling release does not mean it's pulling the very latest software versions. It simply means, that rather than upgrading your distro release on a scheduled basis, you are staying with the same release and receiving major package updates in place.

I think MX Linux with Fluxbox might also be a good fit. Fluxbox takes less resources than XFCE, and is wildly more customizable, given a person's gumption. I was impressed last time I played with it.
 

osprey

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gvsoc wrote:
Debian Testing (or "next-stable"), indeed does receive security updates, and so do the backports from it (see https://backports.debian.org)

Here is the official version from: https://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/securing-debian-manual/ch10.en.html#security-support-testing
10.1.4. Security support for the testing branch
If you are using the testing branch, there are some issues that you must take into account regarding the availability of security updates:
When a security fix is prepared, the Security Team backports the patch to stable (since stable is usually some minor or major versions behind). Package maintainers are responsible for preparing packages for the unstable branch, usually based on a new upstream release. Sometimes the changes happen at nearly the same time and sometimes one of the releases gets the security fix before. Packages for the stable distribution are more thoroughly tested than unstable, since the latter will in most cases provide the latest upstream release (which might include new, unknown bugs).
Security updates are available for the unstable branch usually when the package maintainer makes a new package and for the stable branch when the Security Team make a new upload and publish a DSA. Notice that neither of these change the testing branch.
If no (new) bugs are detected in the unstable version of the package, it moves to testing after several days. The time this takes is usually ten days, although that depends on the upload priority of the change and whether the package is blocked from entering testing by its dependency relationships. Note that if the package is blocked from entering testing the upload priority will not change the time it takes to enter.

This behavior might change based on the release state of the distribution. When a release is almost imminent, the Security Team or package maintainers might provide updates directly to testing.
Additionally, the http://secure-testing-master.debian.net can issue Debian Testing Security Advisories (DTSAs) for packages in the testing branch if there is an immediate need to fix a security issue in that branch and cannot wait for the normal procedure (or the normal procedure is being blocked by some other packages).
 
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