Display Issues [SOLVED]

J_New

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I installed Mint on a brand new build, the latest version as of this writing.

I moved to a 43" television for my computer monitor, but when I booted up I got the "out of memory" error message and the OS wouldn't load. After searching for solutions, it appears it has to do with the default display settings which are unable to deal with the large monitor.

My question is how do I set Mint so it can handle my new display?
 


kc1di

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Hello @J_New, Welcome to Linux.org forum.
It would be helpful if you give us a little more info on your setup. Graphics card for instance. Go to a terminal
and type this command and post the output here.
Code:
inxi -Fxxzr
 
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J_New

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Thanks. See below:

System: Kernel: 5.15.0-58-generic x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc v: 11.3.0 Desktop: Cinnamon 5.6.7 tk: GTK 3.24.33 wm: muffin dm: LightDM Distro: Linux Mint 21.1 Vera base: Ubuntu 22.04 jammy Machine: Type: Desktop System: Micro-Star product: MS-7D91 v: 4.0 serial: <superuser required> Mobo: Micro-Star model: MAG Z790 TOMAHAWK WIFI (MS-7D91) v: 4.0 serial: <superuser required> UEFI: American Megatrends LLC. v: H.00 date: 09/21/2022 Battery: Device-1: hidpp_battery_0 model: Logitech MX Keys Wireless Keyboard serial: <filter> charge: 55% (should be ignored) status: Discharging Device-2: hidpp_battery_1 model: Logitech Wireless Mouse MX Master 3 serial: <filter> charge: 100% (should be ignored) status: Discharging CPU: Info: 24-core (8-mt/16-st) model: 13th Gen Intel Core i9-13900K bits: 64 type: MST AMCP arch: N/A rev: 1 cache: L1: 2.1 MiB L2: 32 MiB L3: 36 MiB Speed (MHz): avg: 4982 high: 5700 min/max: 800/4053:4284:4342:4400 cores: 1: 5500 2: 5513 3: 5464 4: 5500 5: 5500 6: 5512 7: 5500 8: 5512 9: 5613 10: 5600 11: 5692 12: 5700 13: 5614 14: 5600 15: 5613 16: 5600 17: 4401 18: 4394 19: 4426 20: 4428 21: 4353 22: 4467 23: 4375 24: 4362 25: 4409 26: 4407 27: 4402 28: 4446 29: 4402 30: 4360 31: 4395 32: 4391 bogomips: 191692 Flags: avx avx2 ht lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx Graphics: Device-1: Intel vendor: Micro-Star MSI driver: N/A bus-ID: 00:02.0 chip-ID: 8086:a780 Device-2: NVIDIA GA104 [GeForce RTX 3070 Lite Hash Rate] vendor: Micro-Star MSI driver: N/A pcie: speed: 16 GT/s lanes: 16 bus-ID: 01:00.0 chip-ID: 10de:2488 Display: x11 server: X.Org v: 1.21.1.3 driver: X: loaded: nouveau,vesa unloaded: fbdev,modesetting gpu: N/A display-ID: :0 screens: 1 Screen-1: 0 s-res: 1680x1050 s-dpi: 96 Monitor-1: default res: 1680x1050 size: N/A OpenGL: renderer: llvmpipe (LLVM 13.0.1 256 bits) v: 4.5 Mesa 22.0.5 direct render: Yes Audio: Device-1: Intel vendor: Micro-Star MSI driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus-ID: 00:1f.3 chip-ID: 8086:7a50 Device-2: NVIDIA GA104 High Definition Audio vendor: Micro-Star MSI driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel pcie: speed: 16 GT/s lanes: 16 bus-ID: 01:00.1 chip-ID: 10de:228b Device-3: Micro Star USB Audio type: USB driver: hid-generic,snd-usb-audio,usbhid bus-ID: 1-11:7 chip-ID: 0db0:a74b Sound Server-1: ALSA v: k5.15.0-58-generic running: yes Sound Server-2: PulseAudio v: 15.99.1 running: yes Sound Server-3: PipeWire v: 0.3.48 running: yes Network: Device-1: Intel driver: iwlwifi v: kernel port: N/A bus-ID: 00:14.3 chip-ID: 8086:7a70 IF: wlo1 state: down mac: <filter> Device-2: Intel vendor: Micro-Star MSI driver: igc v: kernel pcie: speed: 5 GT/s lanes: 1 port: N/A bus-ID: 05:00.0 chip-ID: 8086:125c IF: enp5s0 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter> Bluetooth: Device-1: Intel type: USB driver: btusb v: 0.8 bus-ID: 1-14:11 chip-ID: 8087:0033 Report: hciconfig ID: hci0 rfk-id: 1 state: down bt-service: enabled,running rfk-block: hardware: no software: yes address: <filter> Drives: Local Storage: total: 8.19 TiB used: 31.95 GiB (0.4%) ID-1: /dev/nvme0n1 vendor: Samsung model: SSD 980 PRO 2TB size: 1.82 TiB speed: 63.2 Gb/s lanes: 4 serial: <filter> temp: 22.9 C ID-2: /dev/nvme1n1 vendor: Gigabyte model: GP-AG41TB size: 931.51 GiB speed: 63.2 Gb/s lanes: 4 serial: <filter> temp: 21.9 C ID-3: /dev/sda vendor: Western Digital model: WD6004FZWX-00BKVA0 size: 5.46 TiB speed: 6.0 Gb/s serial: <filter> Partition: ID-1: / size: 1.79 TiB used: 31.95 GiB (1.7%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/nvme0n1p2 ID-2: /boot/efi size: 511 MiB used: 5.2 MiB (1.0%) fs: vfat dev: /dev/nvme0n1p1 Swap: ID-1: swap-1 type: file size: 2 GiB used: 0 KiB (0.0%) priority: -2 file: /swapfile Sensors: System Temperatures: cpu: 27.8 C mobo: N/A Fan Speeds (RPM): N/A Repos: Packages: apt: 2658 No active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list 1: deb http://packages.linuxmint.com vera main upstream import backport 2: deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu jammy main restricted universe multiverse 3: deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu jammy-updates main restricted universe multiverse 4: deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu jammy-backports main restricted universe multiverse 5: deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ jammy-security main restricted universe multiverse Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/opera-stable.list 1: deb https://deb.opera.com/opera-stable/ stable non-free Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/thopiekar-openrgb-jammy.list 1: deb [arch=amd64 signed-by=/etc/apt/keyrings/thopiekar-openrgb-jammy.gpg] https://ppa.launchpadcontent.net/thopiekar/openrgb/ubuntu jammy main Info: Processes: 517 Uptime: 5m Memory: 62.58 GiB used: 2.31 GiB (3.7%) Init: systemd v: 249 runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 11.3.0 alt: 11 Shell: Bash v: 5.1.16 running-in: gnome-terminal inxi: 3.3.13
 

osprey

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I installed Mint on a brand new build, the latest version as of this writing.

I moved to a 43" television for my computer monitor, but when I booted up I got the "out of memory" error message and the OS wouldn't load. After searching for solutions, it appears it has to do with the default display settings which are unable to deal with the large monitor.

My question is how do I set Mint so it can handle my new display?
A couple of observations:

This graphics card (NVIDIA GA104 [GeForce RTX 3070) is quite powerful:
The GeForce RTXTM 3070 Ti and RTX 3070 graphics cards are powered by Ampere—NVIDIA's 2nd gen RTX architecture. Built with dedicated 2nd gen RT Cores and 3rd gen Tensor Cores, streaming multiprocessors, and high-speed memory, they give you the power you need to rip through the most demanding games.
so to use its features optimally, it almost certainly needs the Nvidia driver rather than the nouveau which appears to be in use.

The out of memory message is from the kernel rather than the graphics card. First port of call is to have a look at the logs, in particular the kernel log at /var/log/kern.log to see what it says. There are also the logs available from journalctl, /var/log/syslog and /var/log/messages. They cover similar territory but are all worth a look in such a case if they exist.
 

Lord Boltar

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Have a look here - https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1842320

You can also edit /etc/default/grub and look for the following:
# The resolution used on graphical terminal
# note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports via VBE
# you can see them in real GRUB with the command `vbeinfo'
#GRUB_GFXMODE=640x480

and remove the # in front of it so it looks like
GRUB_GFXMODE=640x480
Save the file and run
Code:
sudo update-grub
afterwards. Now reboot you can always undo it if it does not work
 
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J_New

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A couple of observations...

Thank you for your info.
Full disclosure: I'm quite new to Linux as a whole, so I'm not sure how I can remedy this problem. As I said, this is a new build (my first). After installing Mint and starting for the first time, the OS ran me through several driver updates, stating that the Nouveau driver is "recommended." But after reading your advice, I'm not so sure.

As far as the Out of Memory issue, I would have no clue what would stand out as problematic in the kernal log. Should I be looking for something specific?
 

Lord Boltar

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Thank you for your info.
Full disclosure: I'm quite new to Linux as a whole, so I'm not sure how I can remedy this problem. As I said, this is a new build (my first). After installing Mint and starting for the first time, the OS ran me through several driver updates, stating that the Nouveau driver is "recommended." But after reading your advice, I'm not so sure.

As far as the Out of Memory issue, I would have no clue what would stand out as problematic in the kernal log. Should I be looking for something specific?
More like a grub issue see my post #5
 

kc1di

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Try Lord Boltar's suggestion. Nouveau driver is usually recommended but not always the best one for Nvidia cards.
 
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J_New

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Try Lord Boltar's suggestion. Nouveau driver is usually recommended but not always the best one for Nvidia cards.
Thanks. I discovered that the Nvidia driver is the recommended (latest) driver and it is being used. I think I originally had it as Nouveau, but that's been changed.
 

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Condobloke

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When you navigate to the grub file.......open the /etc folder as root. Right click on the folder and select open as root.....put in your password.......then continue navigating to the grub file.......make whatever changes you need to and then click on save ......the save icon is up above....hover your mouse over it...it iwll show its name.......you will see down in the bottom of that screen...saving blah blah blah.....when that finishes (it only takes seconds)........click on Terminal (or ctrl+alt+T) and copy and paste this in......
Code:
sudo update-grub
put in password....allow it to complete

Thats it....yiur grub file is saved and the grub is updated.

Reboot
 
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J_New

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When you navigate to the grub file.......open the /etc folder as root. Right click on the folder and select open as root.....put in your password.......then continue navigating to the grub file.......make whatever changes you need to and then click on save ......the save icon is up above....hover your mouse over it...it iwll show its name.......you will see down in the bottom of that screen...saving blah blah blah.....when that finishes (it only takes seconds)........click on Terminal (or ctrl+alt+T) and copy and paste this in......
Code:
sudo update-grub
put in password....allow it to complete

Thats it....yiur grub file is saved and the grub is updated.

Reboot
Thanks for that! It worked like a charm.
 
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J_New

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Using Lord Boltar's advice, I've actuallt managed to get something to show on the monitor, so we are making progress.
However, I realized the aspect ratio is off. I figure it's because the grub file is set to 640x480, so I changed it to read the aspect ratio of my television monitor -- which is 3840x2160. Then I ran the update code for it, powered down, and switched to the new monitor. Unfortunately, I got the "Out of memory" error again.

Does anyone think if I put the # sign back again it will help? I'm not sure.
 

Condobloke

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You seemed to be having better success before you made the additional change in grub. That setting in grub Only affects the grub screen at boot....
Put the # sign back and save it and update grub again
 

kc1di

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Using Lord Boltar's advice, I've actuallt managed to get something to show on the monitor, so we are making progress.
However, I realized the aspect ratio is off. I figure it's because the grub file is set to 640x480, so I changed it to read the aspect ratio of my television monitor -- which is 3840x2160. Then I ran the update code for it, powered down, and switched to the new monitor. Unfortunately, I got the "Out of memory" error again.

Does anyone think if I put the # sign back again it will help? I'm not sure.
that ratio won't work in grub. That will have to be set via the driver settings. put 800x600 in that line update grub again and see what happens.
It would help us to know which graphics device is being used also. Is it the intel or nvidia?
This page may be of help -- read it carefully.
How to set grub resolution.
 
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J_New

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that ratio won't work in grub. That will have to be set via the driver settings. put 800x600 in that line update grub again and see what happens.
It would help us to know which graphics device is being used also. Is it the intel or nvidia?
This page may be of help -- read it carefully.
How to set grub resolution.

Last question answer: my GPU is MSI RTX 3070 Ventus 2X 8G OC LHR NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8GB GDDR6.

I've followed the instructions per the link you shared. It's a bit confusing because the author first says to run the hwinfo command (which I did), and adds that if that doesn't work, to use videoinfo. But hwinfo did run through without errors, yet the instructions then say to utilize the videoinfo command anyway when I'm "at Grub boot-menu, press c to get into command console."

The problem is that getting my original "out of memory" was the only way I could get to the Grub boot menu, so I set it back to the original settings so I could get there. Once I made it to the Grub boot menu, I typed "videoinfo" to list supported video modes – but that returned: "Secure Boot forbids loading module from (hd1,gpt2)/boot/grub/x86_64-efi/videoinfo.mod." I guess it's saying I'm not allowed to ask that under those conditions...? He also talks about being able to make changes via a program called "Grub Customizer" but it appears to have bugs for anything over Unbuntu 22.04.

Is there any other way I can find a list of all the resolutions for a proper entry in my Grub file?
 

wizardfromoz

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G'day @J_New , you are on a good learning curve, well done so far and welcome :)

Secure Boot forbids loading module from

Give yours is a new build, you likely know how to get into your System BIOS with a function key at startup - in there, you can likely turn off Secure Boot.

Can you give us the output from

Code:
xrandr

please?

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
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J_New

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G'day @J_New , you are on a good learning curve, well done so far and welcome :)



Give yours is a new build, you likely know how to get into your System BIOS with a function key at startup - in there, you can likely turn off Secure Boot.

Can you give us the output from

Code:
xrandr

please?

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
Learning curve, indeed!

1. Should I turn off secure boot? I think I can find it. It's probably in the advance settings, but I'll see.

2. When I enter xrandr in a terminal, here's what I get:
Code:
xrandr: Failed to get size of gamma for output default
Screen 0: minimum 1680 x 1050, current 1680 x 1050, maximum 1680 x 1050
default connected primary 1680x1050+0+0 0mm x 0mm
1680x1050     77.00*

3. For the sake of clarity, this is what my grub file looks like:
Code:
# If you change this file, run 'update-grub' afterwards to update
# /boot/grub/grub.cfg.
# For full documentation of the options in this file, see:
#   info -f grub -n 'Simple configuration'

GRUB_DEFAULT=0
GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=hidden
GRUB_TIMEOUT=0
GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian`
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=""

# Uncomment to enable BadRAM filtering, modify to suit your needs
# This works with Linux (no patch required) and with any kernel that obtains
# the memory map information from GRUB (GNU Mach, kernel of FreeBSD ...)
#GRUB_BADRAM="0x01234567,0xfefefefe,0x89abcdef,0xefefefef"

# Uncomment to disable graphical terminal (grub-pc only)
#GRUB_TERMINAL=console

# The resolution used on graphical terminal
# note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports via VBE
# you can see them in real GRUB with the command `vbeinfo'
#GRUB_GFXMODE=800x600

# Uncomment if you don't want GRUB to pass "root=UUID=xxx" parameter to Linux
#GRUB_DISABLE_LINUX_UUID=true

# Uncomment to disable generation of recovery mode menu entries
#GRUB_DISABLE_RECOVERY="true"

# Uncomment to get a beep at grub start
#GRUB_INIT_TUNE="480 440 1"

(Note: if I get rid of the # sign where it states "#GRUB_GFXMODE=800x600", I can get a signal with the monitor I want to use, even though it's in the wrong resolution. If I put the # back on that line or change the 800x600 resolution, it won't boot on that monitor. I'm bouncing back and forth between two monitors so I can test.)
 

wizardfromoz

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1. Should I turn off secure boot?
Yes

This is just a bit of brainstorming and I hope it helps rather than hinders.

1.

With your /etc/default/grub , where the two lines are saying

GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=hidden
GRUB_TIMEOUT=0

change those to

GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=menu
GRUB_TIMEOUT=10

then run

sudo update-grub

and reboot. This will give you a Grub Menu with plenty of time to react (you can always change the timeout later).

From the Grub Menu, then choose the c command to get a console and then type and enter the

videoinfo

command

Note down all the resolutions and if there is an asterisk beside one note that (don't worry about the frequencies), and then post them here.

For yourself, and the rest of The Viewers, it is important to note these comments from the text output for /etc/default/grub

# The resolution used on graphical terminal
# note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports via VBE
# you can see them in real GRUB with the command `vbeinfo'

That 3rd line is rubbish, vbeinfo has not been the default since Grub2 replaced Grub Legacy, but only Manjaro and a couple of other Distro's Devs have got it right, and that is only recently. This goes back 7 - 8 years at least.

So they should read

# The resolution used on graphical terminal
# note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports via VBE
# you can see them in real GRUB with the command `videoinfo'

My line of thought here is to do with that part "note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports" and we would get a better picture of that with videoinfo output.

Where you have

xrandr: Failed to get size of gamma for output default

2. Can you give us the output of

Code:
grep -i vesa /var/log/Xorg.0.log

Best to copy and paste that into Terminal, that 0 is a zero.

Cheers

Wizard
 
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