/dev/sda1 already mounted or /busy

mastersmodo

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Been wanting to learn Linux for a long time. I was given an Unbunto 12.04 machine that no one could get into to play with. I have srtarted the recovery mode and was able to change the root password. During that process I used mount -o ,rw /. I was successful. However, there is not a root option to login on the start up screen. So, where that is cool and all I'm still stuck. I attempted to change the password of the account that is there. However, I get authentication token manipulation error. The solutions I find are to do the mounting step I already did. When I do it,it states the error in the title. How do i get around this?
 


mastersmodo

New Member
Credits
27
Been wanting to learn Linux for a long time. I was given an Unbunto 12.04 machine that no one could get into to play with. I have srtarted the recovery mode and was able to change the root password. During that process I used mount -o ,rw /. I was successful. However, there is not a root option to login on the start up screen. So, where that is cool and all I'm still stuck. I attempted to change the password of the account that is there. However, I get authentication token manipulation error. The solutions I find are to do the mounting step I already did. When I do it,it states the error in the title. How do i get around this?
 

f33dm3bits

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It should be:
Code:
mount -o remount,rw /
You can also try to do it by booting from the installation media.
1. Boot: from cd/usb.
2. Select to boot from: Rescue a broke system.
3. Select Language: Your language or English.
4. Select Location: Your location.
5. Select Keyboard and some more language stuff: US
6. Select the device with your root filesystem.
7. Drop to root shell: Execute a shell in /dev/sda1(where ever your root filesystem is)
8. Reset root password: passwd root
9. Reboot: Exit and choose to reboot.
10. Login with the new password.
Although you shouldn't be running Ubuntu 12.04 because that version is End of Life and doesn't receive anymore updates so it's not safe to be running.
 

KGIII

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If the computer is new to you, you should just wipe the entire thing and install a clean (modern, and supported) operating system on it - for any number of reasons, including security, privacy, and just plain headache-reducing.

Rather than inherit the problems from the previous owner, you can create your own litany of problems as you learn to use Linux.
 
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