Dell Inspiron-3268 - Teething Problems with Ubuntu 18.04

Jim43

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Try a third party (non official) app to burn the iso to the micro usb

eg ....unetbootin ....it is free and does not require password input......
I just looked at the UNetbootin site and attempted to download and install it. To enter and run the code shown on that page requires both a terminal window to be opened (no problem) AND a password (major problem, as described in a few of my posts). Thank you for the information and the link. But at this time, I feel a slightly different approach would be needed.
Jim43
 


Jim43

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Just a quick and hopefully short update here: A few minutes ago I attempted to download, install, and run the program UNetbootin that has been mentioned in this forum. Perhaps unfortunately, to run the code given requires a password before that code is run. That is a major problem if there is no way to know or confirm a password. At this time, it seems that perhaps my best options might be to attempt to contact a local university and talk to someone in their computer science department about getting some help. Thanks again to this forum and to this group for the tips and suggestions given.
Jim43
 

Condobloke

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How sure are you that the password asked for is for the Linux system and not for the wifi/router/modem etc ?
 

Jim43

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How sure are you that the password asked for is for the Linux system and not for the wifi/router/modem etc ?
The computer is already connected to the local network. This can be verified by clicking on the network settings or by checking the traffic monitor for the router. Also, the WiFi router is in a different room from the computer.
 
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jglen490

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So, other than me being totally confused, do you or do you not know your password on the Dell machine? The sudo command on the command line and the password prompt for GUI admin operations both use your normal sign on password when the machine boots to your Linux.
 

jglen490

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And by the way, admin level operations in Linux require elevated permissions. It's not to spy on you, it's for the integrity of the system installation.
 

Jim43

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When I first turn the Dell computer on each morning, it boots to the desktop. I am not asked for a password to reach the desktop, only when I want to do something (anything) that requires the Terminal and the sudo command.
 

Jim43

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And by the way, admin level operations in Linux require elevated permissions. It's not to spy on you, it's for the integrity of the system installation.
But as the ONLY user of the Dell computer, shouldn't that user have admin level permissions?
 

Jim43

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The computer is already connected to the local network. This can be verified by clicking on the network settings or by checking the traffic monitor for the router.
The WiFi or router are entirely separate units. Each has its own control password.
 

Condobloke

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I seem to remember that you have Ubuntu 18.04 on this pc

If that is correct.....try this. It does work, I have used it on one of my own pc's

 

jglen490

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But as the ONLY user of the Dell computer, shouldn't that user have admin level permissions?
No.

To mitigate that, the *buntu distros use your logon password to verify access to elevated permissions needed.

Linux is not Windows, Windows is not Linux.
 

Jim43

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I seem to remember that you have Ubuntu 18.04 on this pc

If that is correct.....try this. It does work, I have used it on one of my own pc's

Just watched that video and will try it in a few minutes. Thank you.
After reading this, and a few other messages, I did a 'Restart' of the computer. I held the Left Shift button down until the desktop came up. There was no menu with any options. After that attempt, I powered the computer off, waited about two minutes, then powered it back on again holding the Left Shift button during the process. Again, I held the Left Shift button until the desktop came up. And again, there was no menu with any options.
 
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Jim43

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No.

To mitigate that, the *buntu distros use your logon password to verify access to elevated permissions needed.

Linux is not Windows, Windows is not Linux.
"Linux is not Windows, Windows is not Linux." And of that, I am most happy. My problem with Windows started when they (it) wanted the password for some Microsoft account that I had to set up to install and use some Microsoft program, but really never used. Thus, that password was forgotten.
 

jglen490

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On a single user Linux box, it's O.K., more or less, to bypass the password on logon, but never forget that you do have a password so you can access elevated permissions when you need to.

It's O.K., but I will never recommend it. Your PC, your data, deserves all the protection you can give - physical, logical, security. Always keep your PC up to date regardless of OS, always install security updates even on applications that you "never use", because those are the applications the bad guys will use to attack your system. And above all be careful with links in emails and web pages, even if they look good. If someone sends you a link and says "click on this", don't. Go find and use the actual, verified URL for the location, or just don't bother with it.
 

Jim43

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On a single user Linux box, it's O.K., more or less, to bypass the password on logon, but never forget that you do have a password so you can access elevated permissions when you need to.

It's O.K., but I will never recommend it. Your PC, your data, deserves all the protection you can give - physical, logical, security. Always keep your PC up to date regardless of OS, always install security updates even on applications that you "never use", because those are the applications the bad guys will use to attack your system. And above all be careful with links in emails and web pages, even if they look good. If someone sends you a link and says "click on this", don't. Go find and use the actual, verified URL for the location, or just don't bother with it.
One of my basic 'rules of thumb' is that any (repeat ANY) message comes in with a suspicious sounding subject line ("For you" or "Look at this" or "Do these look familiar?"), as examples, that message is not downloaded to my computer. I can look at it on the server, and if the return email address is not the same as the identified sender then that message is reported as spam and deleted.
 

Jim43

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Another update: Yesterday, somebody on this list suggested that I press and hold the Left Shift key as the computer (the Dell) is booted. I did that yesterday first as a simple reboot, them as a complete power-off and power-on sequence. Both times there was no new menu with additional options that might include setting, or resetting a lost or forgotten password. This morning as I turned the computer on, I pressed (and held) the Left Shift key and that extra menu DID appear. I did move to an 'other settings' option and did find the option to change the password. The password has been changed and tested by removing (successfully) the unknown person that had been listed as a user with a deleted or deactivated account on the computer. When prompted for a password to unlock the Users page, the password I had just set worked and now I am the only user on this computer. In a little while, after a few errands are completed, I will again attempt to burn the ISO file needed to regain use of the PBP laptop.
Thanks to all that have offered help and suggestions.
Jim43
 

Jim43

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Perhaps a final (?) update on this (or these) issues: On the Dell desktop computer; I have managed to regain full control and access to administrative authority. There are no other users shown on this computer. This situation can be marked as 'Solved.' The other issue that I was asking about concerns a PineBook Pro laptop. On that computer I have managed to gain at least some control of the computer, but problems remain. Those remaining problems will be addressed in the pine.org forum. A big and hearty thank you to all that have offered suggestions for me to try. Keep up the good work you are doing.
Jim43
 


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