Create partition for Linux Mint with Gparted

Liispeth

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Hi there,

I want to install Linux Mint on an extra partition on my Windows computer. Unfortunately Windows is hindering me to make an at least 50 GB big partition although I have enough free GBs. So I am using Gparted to force an extra partiton the size I want.
I burnt Gparted on a DVD. When I start the boot menu with F12 and chose the DVD with Gparted, it just goes back to the main boot menu (see first jpeg).
I also put Gparted on a live USB Stick. When I chose it from the boot menu it gives me the following error message (check out second and third jpeg).

I used this website https://www.wikihow.com/Use-GParted, to find my way with Gparted. What am I doing wrong?

Regards
Liis
 

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arochester

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captain-sensible

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good day all , i survived last night !

@Liispeth basically validating a download is to check its integrity as compared to the integrity of the source.

let me show you an example of how its done with linux; yes your on Windows but soon you will have linux.

So if you go here https://slackbuilds.org/repository/14.2/academic/latex2html/?search=latex2html you will see latex2html-2019.2.tar.gz which you can download and a number next to it.

To find out integrity i download it to my Desktop and run this command(copied from my terminal)
bash-5.0$ md5sum latex2html-2019.2.tar.gz
e9ca34903ac23a6f51385f05fa63c6eb latex2html-2019.2.tar.gz

You see that number starting e9.. will compare it to the number quoted on the top link. Its the same , so the file is not corrupted.

Now regarding live gparted- if you are going to the trouble of putting something onto a usb why not put something like knoppix on it, which has a lot of stuff including gparted as default ?


For windows long tie since i used it but maybe use something like : https://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/ others will chip in maybe with their suggestions .


Attached is me evoking gparted from my laptop running slackware . Now you see that drop down near top right it says /dev/sda . thats where my laptop is ,so i don't want to touch that. Thats probably the 1st important rule. If you have a usb attched , use that drop down and see if you see something like /dev/sdb1 .(make sure nothing else that your not sure of identity is attached like external hard drive)

As long as you are playing with a usb you can then "play" with menu see that along top "device" , "partition"
 

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Liispeth

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It seems something was wrong with my gparted version. I used the one in the link arochester pruposed and I was able to use gparted and generate a new partition. Windows is still working so thank you TWO!
 

digitard

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Windows is like a corpse of a whale in my hard drive, and it populates 3 partitions of the 4 that it allows to create, So I put Debian in the space it allowed me... and no swap, which causeing some minor problems so far. I'm willing to risk the integrity of Windows installation now as long as Debian remain intact for accessing help on the internet.

1) Can I add swap space for the existing Debian now without reinstalling?

2) Can I create encrypted partitions that only Debian can access but without be encrypted itself?
 

digitard

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Debian: don't mind me, I'll do my thing here in the corner, I won't bother you at all

Windows: whatever man

Debian fully functional in the corner

[This post has been edited by mods, when you remove something you put something like this in its place. Thank you. Digitard]
 
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captain-sensible

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Can I add swap space for the existing Debian now without reinstalling?
yes as long as there is room for it. As I understand it it can be at start or end. However during Slackware install it asks where SWAP is; not sure on Debian how you are going to let system know there is now SWAP or whether it will be picked up auto ?
 

f33dm3bits

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You can create a swap partition after install, should be the same on all distributions:
1. Create a partition: Using fdisk or gparted or another partitioning program.
2. Format it as swap: sudo mkswap /dev/sdX
3. Activate it: sudo swapon /dev/sdX
4. Add the swap partition to your fstab.
 
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f33dm3bits

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@captain-sensible
Can be either with UUID or partition name, so either of these.
Code:
UUID=5daeccab-0df8-46de-8301-9d68e1d45d05 none swap defaults 0 0
/dev/sda4 none swap defaults 0 0
/dev/myvg/swap none swap defaults 0 0
 

digitard

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yes as long as there is room for it. As I understand it it can be at start or end. However during Slackware install it asks where SWAP is; not sure on Debian how you are going to let system know there is now SWAP or whether it will be picked up auto ?
Debian asks you to setup a swap space, if you skip it asks again and tell you that it won't work properly but it can continue installation without swap space
 

f33dm3bits

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2) Can I create encrypted partitions that only Debian can access but without be encrypted itself?
What do you mean with this? An encrypted partition without being encrypted? Or do you mean that an encrypted swap partition that gets unencrypted when Debian is started? You can created encrypted partitions during install for where your OS is installed and also create more encrypted partitions and use them how you like.
 

digitard

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What do you mean with this? An encrypted partition without being encrypted? Or do you mean that an encrypted swap partition that gets unencrypted when Debian is started? You can created encrypted partitions during install for where your OS is installed and also create more encrypted partitions and use them how you like.
What I asked is if I can have encrypted storage space (partition) for whatever use but the operating system it self not been encrypted... I don't know exactly what I'm doing but it seems that it's not the right way. It should be an entire separate OS encrypted and use the remaining space in its partition for storage. Any thoughts are welcomed
 

f33dm3bits

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You can either choose to install the OS on unencrypted partitions during install and then after installation you can create a separate partition which is encrypted. Or during install create the normal partitions where the OS is installed first then while you are creating partitions anyways you can create another partition and select that specific partition to be encrypted and where you want it mounted. Safes you time from having to do it afterwards but both are possible.
 

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