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Compatibility.

Nissakiorate

New Member
I have a bunch of questions I can't find anywhere, so I'm gonna ask them here.

1. can a machine be incompatible with linux?

2. how can I check the compatibility if the site only has windows and chromebook listed?

3. if a trackpad driver is windows based, will I be able to use it on Linux?

4. if I royally mess up an installation to the point of no return, would a store accept this under 30-day return?

5. can i dual boot two different distros? For example, Archlinux and Pop!_OS.
Thank you for your time!
 
Last edited:


Rob

Administrator
Staff member
Hey there - welcome to the forum!

Your first 4 questions can be answered by using a usb stick to trial a linux distribution on your machine. This will let you test drive it, see which functions work and what ones may be a little difficult to set up - all while making no changes at all on the machine itself.

I'm not sure on #5 .. though, a local pc tech could help you to get windows back on it if the store won't accept it back i'm sure.
 

Nissakiorate

New Member
Hey there - welcome to the forum!

Your first 4 questions can be answered by using a usb stick to trial a linux distribution on your machine. This will let you test drive it, see which functions work and what ones may be a little difficult to set up - all while making no changes at all on the machine itself.
Thanks!

I haven't bought it yet, So I'm trying to figure out compatibility ahead of time. It's probably going to be an Acer nitro 5, and I can't find anything on compatibility of that.
 

Rob

Administrator
Staff member
Ok - we've had a couple threads on this particular model..



I'm sure @atanere and @wizardfromoz will be along shortly also - they seemed to be active in those posts and could help more than I could :)

It looks like some of these come with 'Linpus' installed which seems like an older distro - or died out from what I saw in the other threads..
 

Nissakiorate

New Member
Ok - we've had a couple threads on this particular model..



I'm sure @atanere and @wizardfromoz will be along shortly also - they seemed to be active in those posts and could help more than I could :)
Ok, I'll read those. Then I'll get back here.
 

Nissakiorate

New Member
Both of those problems seem to be around things other than compatibility (linpus pre-installed).
I'm checking for compatibility with the one with windows pre-installed.

Is there any major difference between Ubuntu and Pop!_OS?
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Pop os....We believe the computer and operating system are the most powerful and versatile tools ever created. We’re building an OS for the software developer, maker, and computer science professional who uses their computer as a tool to discover and create.

pop os....hardly an OS for someone beginning

Ubuntu...Ubuntu is a free and open-source Linux distribution based on Debian. Ubuntu is officially released in three editions: Desktop, Server, and Core. All the editions can run on the computer alone, or e.g. in Windows. Ubuntu is a popular operating system for cloud computing, with support for OpenStack.

Certainly a better choice than Pop...depending on how much stress you wish to place yourself under.....

The simplest choice....is Linux Mint (I would recommend version 18.3)

This will challenge a person starting out more than enough.

I would wait to talk to either @atanere or @wizardfromoz regarding that particular pc's compatibility. Otherwise you could end up in a world of hurt.
 

Nissakiorate

New Member
Pop os....We believe the computer and operating system are the most powerful and versatile tools ever created. We’re building an OS for the software developer, maker, and computer science professional who uses their computer as a tool to discover and create.

pop os....hardly an OS for someone beginning

Ubuntu...Ubuntu is a free and open-source Linux distribution based on Debian. Ubuntu is officially released in three editions: Desktop, Server, and Core. All the editions can run on the computer alone, or e.g. in Windows. Ubuntu is a popular operating system for cloud computing, with support for OpenStack.

Certainly a better choice than Pop...depending on how much stress you wish to place yourself under.....

The simplest choice....is Linux Mint (I would recommend version 18.3)

This will challenge a person starting out more than enough.

I would wait to talk to either @atanere or @wizardfromoz regarding that particular pc's compatibility. Otherwise you could end up in a world of hurt.
The reason I'm looking at Pop is because it comes with gaming drivers.
If mint would be easier for jumping into gaming, then I could use that. I also plan on simulation chemistry and the like.
Is the nitro that much of a world of hurt?
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
@atanere @wizardfromoz will be the ones to answer that. wizard will probably appear in a puff of smoke shortly.
 
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wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
4076


G'day @Nissakiorate and welcome to linux.org :)

1. can a machine be incompatible with linux?

Just about none - Acer should have few problems

2. how can I check the compatibility if the site only has windows and chromebook listed?

Google

acer nitro 5 linux

and read the articles

3. if a trackpad driver is windows based, will I be able to use it on Linux?

Likely

4. if I royally mess up an installation to the point of no return, would a store accept this under 30-day return?

Not so likely - have a recovery solution in place for your Windows 10 first before trying

5. can i dual boot two different distros? For example, Archlinux and Pop!_OS.

I am not sure about that one. I only run 90 Linux, with 35 - 40 on this particular Dell Inspiron

See screenshot of just one of my drives

4077


WIZARD'S AUXILIARY DRIVE - WD MY BOOK 4TB

I am typing this from Pop!_OS Linux, which is actually quite easy (Brian @Condobloke ) for newbies, despite their hype. I am not a Gamer, so not sure about that aspect.

Arch, on the other hand, is a steep learning curve.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz

BTW, I am approaching 62, and Brian is some age starting with a 7 :) so if we can handle this, you will likely have no problems
 
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atanere

Moderator
Gold Supporter
Ok. I'll be waiting for smoke.
No smoke here, but I do have a touch of gas. :eek:o_O:D

Wizard answered everything pretty well, as he always does. There are only rare cases where Linux seems to be incompatible... and even then, it may be compatible but the OP just fails to correct the proper BIOS settings to make it work. Reading some of the Google articles, as Wizard suggested, indicates that some Nitro owners may have that trouble. It seems that it will work, but it also seems that you might have a battle with it to get it to work. Up to you. Other brands and models of laptop will be more Linux friendly.

With ANY new Windows computer that you buy, the first step should ALWAYS be to make a Recovery USB drive. All the major manufacturers have a provision for doing this. If your hard drive fails later and needs to be replaced, this Recovery USB is your ticket back to your legitimate copy of Windows. But also, if you are installing Linux and hose everything all up, it is your ticket back from that disaster too. I would guess (not promise) that you could reinstall Windows from the Recovery USB and return it to the store where you bought it. Some stores will charge restocking fees on returned electronics though, so you should be aware of that possibility.

Pop_OS is based on Ubuntu/Debian, so I doubt you'd find any extreme differences. Remember that installing Linux does not need to be forever. If you think Pop_OS is the one, try it! If it doesn't work as well as you thought.... replace it! There are dozens of totally awesome Linux distros just waiting for you to discover them. :D

Welcome to Linux!

Cheers
 

Nissakiorate

New Member
Thanks!
Since you said Acer may have a few problems, are there any brands/machines that you would reccomend? I'd get an Inspiron, but I am limited to $700 or less and found at Best Buy. I'll test dual booting Linux-Linux when I get my laptop. How do you create a recovery USB? How big does it have to be?
 

atanere

Moderator
Gold Supporter
How do you create a recovery USB? How big does it have to be?
Making the Recovery is an app included with Windows. Don't confuse it with making a "system image" though, that isn't the same. The Recovery USB probably needs to be 8GB, I think, or maybe 16GB. It takes quite a long while for the computer to make this USB too, so be patient with it. When it's finished, it will be bootable, and it is capable of restoring the factory-installed system exactly as when you buy it. So if you ever have to use this, all your files and other programs that you later install will be lost.

I'm not particularly against Acer, and some of their models may work great with Linux. The trouble seems to me that the newer BIOS/UEFI "features" can give the trouble with installing Linux. So you could also have trouble with a Dell, Lenovo, HP, or others. Whatever you buy, you just have to work through these settings to find the right combination that will let you install Linux. After that, making a Linux-Linux dual boot won't be much of a problem.

Whatever brand and model computer appeals to you, search on Google for that brand/model and include "Linux" in your search. You should find reports from folks who have already bought that brand/model who may offer some ideas about which are good, and which are not so good.

Cheers
 

Nissakiorate

New Member
Making the Recovery is an app included with Windows. Don't confuse it with making a "system image" though, that isn't the same. The Recovery USB probably needs to be 8GB, I think, or maybe 16GB. It takes quite a long while for the computer to make this USB too, so be patient with it. When it's finished, it will be bootable, and it is capable of restoring the factory-installed system exactly as when you buy it. So if you ever have to use this, all your files and other programs that you later install will be lost.

I'm not particularly against Acer, and some of their models may work great with Linux. The trouble seems to me that the newer BIOS/UEFI "features" can give the trouble with installing Linux. So you could also have trouble with a Dell, Lenovo, HP, or others. Whatever you buy, you just have to work through these settings to find the right combination that will let you install Linux. After that, making a Linux-Linux dual boot won't be much of a problem.

Whatever brand and model computer appeals to you, search on Google for that brand/model and include "Linux" in your search. You should find reports from folks who have already bought that brand/model who may offer some ideas about which are good, and which are not so good.

Cheers
This is all a lot clearer now. Thanks for your help!
 

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