Can't Find My Password

I wouldn't have guessed it really, you're dealing with an amateur here, and amateurs shouldn't even be dealing with Linux, its just too complicated in compatibility for a regular user. Is this hopefully the last step to boot up the live disk?

I just saved and exited and then went to reboot and it still says and "invalid magic number" and asks me to load the kernel first?
A brave amateur indeed :)

Okay. Good work to get so far. The error message about the "magic number" could be for a number of reasons, one of which appears to be a result of a bad iso file on the usb. Laborious as the task is, the best thing to do in this situation is to write the GParted iso file to the usb again. It's best to have a good usb, perhaps a reputable one or one known to be good. If you are writing it from MS, check the several means of how to go about it here: https://gparted.org/liveusb.php#windows-setup
If you are writing the iso from a linux machine, let us know here and readers can supply an appropriate command.
 


I'm already down a road of hurt to try and use Linux to write the new iso so I did it with Windows (which I also hate lol) I am trying everything I can, throwing the kitchen sink at this and I just can't get past this kernel thing. I just reformatted a different USB to Fat32 reinstalled the iso using Balena Etcher through Windows and still getting the same errors. I can't get the live disk booted to split the drive :( this really has put a bad taste in my mouth with Linux, I'm never going to use it again after this I think.
 
I'm already down a road of hurt to try and use Linux to write the new iso so I did it with Windows (which I also hate lol) I am trying everything I can, throwing the kitchen sink at this and I just can't get past this kernel thing. I just reformatted a different USB to Fat32 reinstalled the iso using Balena Etcher through Windows and still getting the same errors. I can't get the live disk booted to split the drive :( this really has put a bad taste in my mouth with Linux, I'm never going to use it again after this I think.
I'm wondering now if any other live disk can boot on your computer. Many of them have gparted on them which would be usable for you. Perhaps look into that. Many linux users have had very frustrating experiences too, so they can sympathise. There is light at the end of the tunnel :)
 
I'm never going to use it again after this I think.

Of course, that is your choice, but I would not be so quick to blame Linux for it, there are many issues involved.

I run 90 Linux distros on this Dell Inspiron laptops 2 internal drives, combined with an external Western Digital, and if you wish to know why, there is a link in my signature.

A part of the problems you are having is likely associated with computer manufacturers bending over backward to cater to the predominant OS in the marketplace, and not caring whether a vision such as Linux prospers or perishes.

Secure Boot and Fast Startup/Boot are Microsoft initiated, not a development by Linux, and yet you are in the ranks of hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of users who are/were not even aware of how their existing system is setup and why.

I note that you chose, in Feren, an unusual starting point, and to clarify something said earlier by another - although it is ultimately connected with Ubuntu, it is in fact more like a clone of Linux Mint, but not as good, IMO.

I would be inclined to follow @osprey 's last suggestion, but with a distribution different to Feren.

More advice if you need it.

Good luck

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
After testing out 20+ distros I chose Feren based on its simplicity and mainly because I can turn off all automatic updates so that it will never update again unless manually. No other distros would allow me to do that. Now I know some users will say that its bad to turn off automatic updates and security patches, etc. But in my experiences I think its absolutely the best approach and I've never had a problem doing it in the past 20 years. I turn off all automatic updates on literally everything; OSX, iOS, iTunes, all apps and programs, Windows (if possible) and Feren was possible, so I chose it for that ability.

@osprey, what other live disk boot options do I have? otherwise, I'm about to give up and start calling shops tomorrow to wipe the drive and install Windows XP or something simple back onto it. I use this ACE mini-PC to run only 1 program - Think or Swim for TD Ameritrade/Schwab and that's it. I don't even use it for browsing, no photos, no music, nothing, just the Think or Swim program and that's all. So I don't need any new op system that's going to repeat update patches and flood the drive with nonsense. The constant update issue is why I tried to leave Windows a year ago and embark down this path of hurt with Linux.

I had high hopes for Linux because I hated Windows that much (and I still do) but its far easier to use than Linux. But I don't even use Windows for anything else besides the Think or Swim. Windows 10 kept dumping update patches into my 32gb Asus VivoSticks TS10 with 2gb of RAM and paralyzed those minis with 100 mb's of drive space left. It was impossible to turn off the automatic updates in Windows 10 but with Windows 11 I think it may be more of a possibility. This auto update flooding is what pushed me to look into Linux for those mini-Sticks. But that became even less of a solution, and Think or Swim works terribly with Linux.

There really is no excuse for a 30-year old op system to still be this complicated. RedHat or independents should have focused on making the code smoother, better, more user-friendly, a better version of Windows, wasn't that the purpose of Linux, wasn't that the intent? RedHat management should have stepped up and supported the op for a real consumer market. It seems like coders lost focus along the way and thought it was better to make over 600 distros instead, like that many was really needed. Linux is way more complicated than Windows (which is a total piece-of-shit). Linux should have been easier than Windows, like inbetween Windows and OSX.

It should have been for OSX users that hated Windows and Windows users that hated Apple. But instead it became the opposite, something only for the super-smart A+ computer geek level that doesn't mind spending tons of time constantly tweaking code in a buggy system. But most people don't have days-on-end to waste inside a shell playing around with codes.

I've been using computers daily since 1997. I'm a B-rated computer user on a scale of A to F for school grades rating with the average user being a C level so I know more than most computer users but come on man, Linux is just way too over-complicated even for me and I use 3 different computers and staring at 8 vertical screens all day every day for stock trading and use a 27" inch iMac as my daily workhorse. So I'm not exactly inept when it comes to this computer stuff. I actually started an online data backup software company 20 years ago with a friend of mine that's still active today Steelgate Technologies in Boston. But even still Linux has just beaten me up. I give up. And I don't usually give up easily. :(
 
I've been using computers daily since 1997.

But you weren't born until 2000?

...wasn't that the purpose of Linux, wasn't that the intent?

No, I can give you some reading if you wish.

@osprey , with #9

Here is a more detailed view which follows that video shown in post #8.

The video shows the disk utility on the system being accessed to try and resize the partitions, but when the user tries to resize the disk, it can't be done because the disk is not unmounted, which is shown in the error message on screen.

The user therefore has "inserted a medium" which is a usb live disk of "Linux Mint 19.1 Cinnamon 64-bit". Running the live disk will leave the computer's disk system unmounted in the first instance.

If there is supposed to be a video with that, you have not provided the link, or am I misreading it?

@Bondppq

how is it so simple for this guy in this video? - ...my UI is the exact same as his, how can I copy this?

Well, as @osprey has explained...you can't. You have to do it either externally, or else from another, installed, Linux distro.

It's a safety feature. Would you try to perform a mechanical overhaul on your car while you were driving it down the highway? I suspect not, unless you wish to leave the engine on the asphalt some distance behind.

On
I chose Feren based on its simplicity and mainly because I can turn off all automatic updates so that it will never update again unless manually. No other distros would allow me to do that.

You weren't looking hard enough.

Here's the one from Linux Mint's Update Manager

P803O2l.png


and that feature can be found in Ubuntu and many many other distros, in one form or another.

Just in case of any misapprehension on your part, we are not an official arm nor organ of Linux, just scored the dot org name - we are manned by volunteer staff who share a love of Linux and have varying skills in various departments.One of mine is in multi-multi-booting.

If you have issues with Red Hat's coding/coders, you would need to take them up with them, let us know how you go.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
@Bondppq wrote:
what other live disk boot options do I have?

Live disks that include the gparted program include:
Ubuntu Live
Linux Mint live
Fedora Workstation Live
Systemrescue

There are many versions of the above live disks and some older ones may not include gparted. There are too many to check.

My preference would be to use Systemrescue which can be found here:
It can be started up in a GUI environment. It's best to read the instructions and information on the website. It's very informative which some other live disks are not.

On the the MS and linux matters, perhaps this page will be of interest:

On the matter of controlling updates, it is entirely possible on linux distributions to stop them. It is often the default, and otherwise, it's a matter of straight forward configuration. Linux is not a telemetry operating system.

Clearly your computer smarts are in very good order. It's just that they're not in linux at the moment. Linux is different and has it's own learning curve. All experienced linux users have had to negotiate that curve. Things improve quite dramatically as one meets the challenges. It does involve a lot of reading and can benefit from experimenting with a "trial and error" approach. It does take up a bit time, especially in the early stages to get it.
 
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@wizardfromoz wrote:
If there is supposed to be a video with that, you have not provided the link, or am I misreading it?
The video is a youtube item shown in post #8 by the OP.

I hadn't read your post #26 before I posted post #27, so there may be a bit of redundancy, but never mind.
 
Just call me Dopey Dora, must have been my Aspie kicking in.

The bit

...but when the user tries to resize the disk, it can't be done because the disk is not unmounted, which is shown in the error message on screen.

confused me, as that did not appear in the OP's video.

All good. ;)
 
Just call me Dopey Dora, must have been my Aspie kicking in.

The bit



confused me, as that did not appear in the OP's video.

All good. ;)
You are correct. The video in post #8 is around 3 minutes, but the full video is around 6 minutes on youtube here:
which was the one I watched and was commenting upon which has the error message at about 39 seconds into the video.
 
This from youtube, on the OP's unit, Linux features at 10:17 if you want to fast forward



There were a couple of other vids, I have not looked at them.

Search keywords I used were

"linux" ACEMAGIC T8 Plus N95 Mini PC
 

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