Canonical: Random Complaining

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DevynCJohnson

Guest
Even though Ubuntu is my favorite distro and Canonical is a great company, I would like to dedicate this thread to complaining about Canonical. I had submitted a wallpaper to the Saucy Wallpaper contest on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/groups/[email protected]/). My wallpaper did not win (I did not think it would), but Canonical no longer displays my wallpaper in the list of submitted wallpapers. I had seen this wallpaper collection made by some third-party (http://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2013/08/137-wallpapers-of-ubuntu-13-10-saucy-salamander-wallpaper-contest/) and noticed my wallpaper was not included (however, this 3rd party did not make complete collection). Then, I went to the Flickr page listed above and saw that my wallpaper is no longer available on the contest submissions even though wallpapers made by other people that did not win are still displayed. That really sucks.

Does anyone else want to complain about Canonical?
 


R

ryanvade

Guest
I really don't like the built in Amazon search. Beyond that, no complaints with Canonical.
 
J

Jim Laughlan

Guest
Replace your Unity with Gnome and Ubuntu is a kick ass version of Linux.
 
R

rstanley

Guest
A response from me for another article on a different system:

When a user installs Windows XP, 7, etc, Mickey$oft has the user create a username and password. Unfortunately, it gives this user Administrator rights. The user usually does not understand the difference between Admin rights and "Limited User" rights, and never creates an "Admin" user. As a result, any Malware infecting the computer, has access to the entire system!

Most Distros of Linux, have the installer set up two accounts, (root, and user) or one normal user and create a password for root.

Ubuntu is the exception, and that is the problem. The newbie user has no understanding of the difference between "root" and "user". To complicate things more, there are so many articles on "How to do XYZ in Ubuntu." The newbie sees all commands being run as "sudo command" as ASS/U/ME's that ALL commands MUST be run with "sudo ..." They are NOT educated in what commands must be run as root, and what can and should be run without "sudo" as the normal user.

Then they many times they (newbies) move to a different Distro where sudo is not configured for the user by default, such as Debian (which I ONLY use), and is lost on how to execute commands as root.

This was the problem ... (with the question I was responding to). I never recommend any version of Ubuntu or any Distro based on Ubuntu.
 
M

Mitt Green

Guest
A response from me for another article on a different system:

When a user installs Windows XP, 7, etc, Mickey$oft has the user create a username and password. Unfortunately, it gives this user Administrator rights. The user usually does not understand the difference between Admin rights and "Limited User" rights, and never creates an "Admin" user. As a result, any Malware infecting the computer, has access to the entire system!

Most Distros of Linux, have the installer set up two accounts, (root, and user) or one normal user and create a password for root.

Ubuntu is the exception, and that is the problem. The newbie user has no understanding of the difference between "root" and "user". To complicate things more, there are so many articles on "How to do XYZ in Ubuntu." The newbie sees all commands being run as "sudo command" as ASS/U/ME's that ALL commands MUST be run with "sudo ..." They are NOT educated in what commands must be run as root, and what can and should be run without "sudo" as the normal user.

Then they many times they (newbies) move to a different Distro where sudo is not configured for the user by default, such as Debian (which I ONLY use), and is lost on how to execute commands as root.

This was the problem ... (with the question I was responding to). I never recommend any version of Ubuntu or any Distro based on Ubuntu.
So, how about gksu? It brings you access to all folders, including root folder?
 
R

rstanley

Guest
So, how about gksu? It brings you access to all folders, including root folder?
You miss my point. Since Ubuntu disables root by default, newbies don't learn the difference between root and a normal user, nor the difference between root and normal user commands. Starting with a regular Distro such as Fedora, Debian, etc... would teach them the normal way.

Unfortunately, some users don't understand that Ubuntu is just another Linux Distro. They think the "Ubuntu Operating System" (As I have sometimes seen it listed) is a totally different Operating System! ;^)
 
M

Mitt Green

Guest
You miss my point. Since Ubuntu disables root by default, newbies don't learn the difference between root and a normal user, nor the difference between root and normal user commands. Starting with a regular Distro such as Fedora, Debian, etc... would teach them the normal way.

Unfortunately, some users don't understand that Ubuntu is just another Linux Distro. They think the "Ubuntu Operating System" (As I have sometimes seen it listed) is a totally different Operating System! ;^)
Got it, but I think newbies should learn something about Linux before start
 
R

rstanley

Guest
Got it, but I think newbies should learn something about Linux before start
RTFM? ;^)

That would be ideal. Did you read a book on Windows before you started using it? I didn't! ;^)

All Distros should come with basic tutorials for newbies.
 
Y

Yesyesloud

Guest
I enjoy the fact they provide a minimal installation disk that allows you to build a bare bones system quite easily, without all the bloatware.

However, even under a custom lightweight DE, Ubuntu can run slower than, for instance, Manjaro (Arch's "Mint"). I may remark my hardware is kind of recent and resourceful.

Apart from that... I also didn't like the built in Amazon search from the regular install.
 

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