Can You Create A Dual-Boot USB?

ryevick

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Hello, I'm new to all of this and I'd like to compare Manjaro and Ubuntu. They seem to be the ones people recommend for beginners. If you have a better suggestion given my needs please let me know. I vaguely remember trying Ubuntu years ago but only briefly.

What would I want to achieve with Linux? Putting Microsoft out of business would be great but seriously, I have many ways I use computers. I am guessing Linux could help me by becoming my daily OS for simple task such as documents and using the internet, I would think. I have much heavier task that I don't think Linux could handle mainly because the software isn't available. I am speaking mainly about things like DAWs such as Steinberg Cubase Pro & Presonus Studio One Pro. I have a home recording studio and although it mostly deals with audio needs I also need large video editing and rendering capabilities.

I was thinking if there were some way to put Manjaro and Ubuntu (or which ever 2 I decide to compare), on the same USB drive and have it prompt me, asking which one I wanted to boot to... that that would be really helpful in my comparison. Is there any software/program or info so that you can Create A Dual-Boot USB Flash Drive?

Any information or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 
Last edited:


Incruste2.0

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Hello ,

personally, i recommend linux mint 19.03 which is a derivative of ubuntu.
With the cinnamon or xfce office manager.

For download see the page below:

distrowacht

this page, will allow you to download the iso that you will want to test or install multi-boot on your computer.

if you have a 32 bit computer, you will not be able to upgrade to the current version linux mint 20.04

You should start with linux mint 19.03, or 20.04 (Be careful if you have a 64bit computer)

At the end of your installation and configuration of your pc, install virtual box, if you have already known VMWare under windows so it will be easy for you.

But if you do not know, I advise you to go see the article below:

article

before installing virtual box, you will have to configure it, you can go to youtube, there are lots of explanatory videos

do not install virtualbox with the software library, it has an old version of virtual box, it must be installed via the internet (the current version of virtual box is 6.1
 

Condobloke

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The link above named ...article....links to a site written in French

Please use english sites only



Be wary of downloading from the official website,....sometimes it is ok, but keep in mind the latest version has not been tested to work without problems with Linux.
 

arochester

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I was thinking if there were some way to put Manjaro and Ubuntu (or which ever 2 I decide to compare), on the same USB drive and have it prompt me, asking which one I wanted to boot to... that that would be really helpful in my comparison. Is there any software/program or info so that you can Create A Dual-Boot USB Flash Drive?
Use Ventoy. https://www.ventoy.net/en/index.html

(Horror of horrors, it seems easier to create under Windows!)

Just put the Manjaro ISO and the Ubuntu ISO onto the USB Flash Drive.

Alternatively you can just try them both online at https://distrotest.net/
 
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ryevick

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Use Ventoy. https://www.ventoy.net/en/index.html

(Horror of horrors, it seems easier to create under Windows!)

Just put the Manjaro ISO and the Ubuntu ISO onto the USB Flash Drive.

Alternatively you can just try them both online at https://distrotest.net/
Awesome! Given my computing needs, do you have recommendations for which versions to try? Now that you've answered the multi boot question, that would be my main interest now. I know people will have varying ideas and suggestions. I'd like to hear them.
 

captain-sensible

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this is my current ventoy stick : ventoy
├── ISO
│ ├── antiX-19.2_x64-full.iso
│ ├── bionicpup64-8.0-uefi.iso
│ ├── clonezilla-live-20200703-focal-amd64.iso
│ ├── rescatux-0.73.iso
│ └── super_grub2_disk_hybrid_2.04s1.iso
├── System Volume Information
│ ├── IndexerVolumeGuid
│ └── WPSettings.dat
├── persistence.img
└── ventoy
└── ventoy.json
 

ryevick

New Member
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Be wary of downloading from the official website,....sometimes it is ok, but keep in mind the latest version has not been tested to work without problems with Linux.

That sounds crazy. I'm new but if the official website of a product can't release it's own product very well... crazy.
 

Vrai

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I just tried this website and it is very "choppy". The mouse cursor is moving like the system is just about to crash. Not sure how to explain.
First guess - bandwidth. As in not enough.
Could be the site was experiencing a heavy load. Perhaps try again at a different time of day.
What are your average download and upload speeds ?
 

Condobloke

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That sounds crazy. I'm new but if the official website of a product can't release it's own product very well... crazy.
Not so crazy,@ryevick ......you are now involved with Linux......not windows.
Windows are renowned for throwing you in the deep end with no care that the app in question may or may not run properly on your OS.
Linux people do go to the trouble of ensuring (as far as possible) that the particular app will respond as it should on the many and various linux distros before they release it via the update channel.

The reason that Linux has software repositories from which you can download SAFE apps etc is a million miles away from the crap that windows serves up. Leaving you to the whims of "official websites" is not the way Linux works.

I am not saying that you cannot download from an official website, but keep in mind that you may run into problems....the website (which has no idea of the configuration of your pc) may not satisfy all dependencies etc etc...resulting in poor performance or a crash etc etc etc....the possibilities are endless.
For all these reasons, most linux distros have access (via the software repository) to an app called Timeshift. It works similarly to windows system restore......the major difference is it works

As you said, you are new, and some of the "mind sets" and approaches do sound a touch crazy.....but there is a lot of thought gone into the brilliant OS called LINUX.

Welcome to the crazy side. Welcome to the freedom of Linux.
 

ryevick

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Not so crazy,@ryevick ......you are now involved with Linux......not windows.
Windows are renowned for throwing you in the deep end with no care that the app in question may or may not run properly on your OS.
Linux people do go to the trouble of ensuring (as far as possible) that the particular app will respond as it should on the many and various linux distros before they release it via the update channel.

The reason that Linux has software repositories from which you can download SAFE apps etc is a million miles away from the crap that windows serves up. Leaving you to the whims of "official websites" is not the way Linux works.

I am not saying that you cannot download from an official website, but keep in mind that you may run into problems....the website (which has no idea of the configuration of your pc) may not satisfy all dependencies etc etc...resulting in poor performance or a crash etc etc etc....the possibilities are endless.
For all these reasons, most linux distros have access (via the software repository) to an app called Timeshift. It works similarly to windows system restore......the major difference is it works

As you said, you are new, and some of the "mind sets" and approaches do sound a touch crazy.....but there is a lot of thought gone into the brilliant OS called LINUX.

Welcome to the crazy side. Welcome to the freedom of Linux.
I get it, no offense meant by the comment. Given that there are a gazillion versions of Linux available, how are you supposed to know where to get the different versions? I would guess there are a couple of reputable sites that host all of the safe/tweaked versions but this is new so just a guess. This may have already been posted but I guess I missed it.
 

ryevick

New Member
Credits
132
Hello ,

personally, i recommend linux mint 19.03 which is a derivative of ubuntu.
With the cinnamon or xfce office manager.

For download see the page below:

distrowacht

this page, will allow you to download the iso that you will want to test or install multi-boot on your computer.

if you have a 32 bit computer, you will not be able to upgrade to the current version linux mint 20.04

You should start with linux mint 19.03, or 20.04 (Be careful if you have a 64bit computer)

At the end of your installation and configuration of your pc, install virtual box, if you have already known VMWare under windows so it will be easy for you.

But if you do not know, I advise you to go see the article below:

article

before installing virtual box, you will have to configure it, you can go to youtube, there are lots of explanatory videos

do not install virtualbox with the software library, it has an old version of virtual box, it must be installed via the internet (the current version of virtual box is 6.1
Be careful if you have 64?
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Credits
4,322
@ryevick no offence taken :cool: ...there are a gazillion versions....most/all are available at distrowatch

I started with Linux Mint 17....and am now on Linux Mint 18.3
I may update to Linux Mint 20.....maybe
I absolutely subscribe to the theory 'if it aint broke dont fix it'
LM does everything I need it to do...it does it quickly and effortlessly.

Others with experience of other 'distros' can fill in the blanks, but generally there will be a "software Manager' or similar in every Linux Distribution. This will provide a link to the 'repository' where all their software is stored....safely
All you need to do in Linux Mint is click on 'menu'....then type 'software manager'....and hit enter. It will open the software manager....just browse around in there....you can search for a specific piece of software...or select the editors picks etc etc....dont be worried about breaking something...it is damn near impossible
If you were to type in Timeshift, it may or may not already have a green tick beside the name. If the tick is there that means that it is already installed.
if it is, just click on menu and type in Timeshift.....if it is already there just single click on the name....and it will open
In general, it is a good idea to store the snapshots that timeshift takes on another hard drive...or if you have one with good capacity a thumb drive 32gb or bigger)
The snapshots are fairly big. Just one of mine is around 29GB....and I have 7 saved. The hard drive they ar on carries approx 250 GB......I have Timeshift set so that it only ever has 7 snapshots ....it automatically deletes the oldest snapshot every day after making a new one.
Not as complicated as it sounds

If you need a "walk through" to set it up....just say so.
if you did manage to "break" something...Timeshift will save your bacon

quote..."
Timeshift:
-By default, backs up only system files
-Allows you to restore the OS if something breaks by rolling back system files. Does not roll back your user files.
-Imaging and restore pretty fast.
-Allows incremental backups - so after an initial backup creating images is even faster, and takes up less disc space per additional backup.

If you want to create complete system images of *everything* for deep storage or creating a second copy of a disc, use Clonezilla.

If you want something to create quick system backups to guard against potential breakage when running update manager, or from just doing something "wrong"..., use Timeshift.

from HERE



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ryevick

New Member
Credits
132
@ryevick no offence taken :cool: ...there are a gazillion versions....most/all are available at distrowatch

I started with Linux Mint 17....and am now on Linux Mint 18.3
I may update to Linux Mint 20.....maybe
I absolutely subscribe to the theory 'if it aint broke dont fix it'
LM does everything I need it to do...it does it quickly and effortlessly.

Others with experience of other 'distros' can fill in the blanks, but generally there will be a "software Manager' or similar in every Linux Distribution. This will provide a link to the 'repository' where all their software is stored....safely
All you need to do in Linux Mint is click on 'menu'....then type 'software manager'....and hit enter. It will open the software manager....just browse around in there....you can search for a specific piece of software...or select the editors picks etc etc....dont be worried about breaking something...it is damn near impossible
If you were to type in Timeshift, it may or may not already have a green tick beside the name. If the tick is there that means that it is already installed.
if it is, just click on menu and type in Timeshift.....if it is already there just single click on the name....and it will open
In general, it is a good idea to store the snapshots that timeshift takes on another hard drive...or if you have one with good capacity a thumb drive 32gb or bigger)
The snapshots are fairly big. Just one of mine is around 29GB....and I have 7 saved. The hard drive they ar on carries approx 250 GB......I have Timeshift set so that it only ever has 7 snapshots ....it automatically deletes the oldest snapshot every day after making a new one.
Not as complicated as it sounds

If you need a "walk through" to set it up....just say so.
if you did manage to "break" something...Timeshift will save your bacon

quote..."
Timeshift:
-By default, backs up only system files
-Allows you to restore the OS if something breaks by rolling back system files. Does not roll back your user files.
-Imaging and restore pretty fast.
-Allows incremental backups - so after an initial backup creating images is even faster, and takes up less disc space per additional backup.

If you want to create complete system images of *everything* for deep storage or creating a second copy of a disc, use Clonezilla.

If you want something to create quick system backups to guard against potential breakage when running update manager, or from just doing something "wrong"..., use Timeshift.

from HERE



Top
I started watching this Linux Mint guide and it seems to be very informative.


He did however download from the 'official site'. If you don't need to worry about breaking something, why not just use the newest version if you have not installed Linux yet? Also what was up with the comment about being careful if running on 64?

I'm sure more questions will be coming but for now I'm going to install Mint, hopefully within a couple of days.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
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4,322
The OS itself should always come from the official site LINUX Mint.com
There is a process to follow to ensure that the ISO image you download is what it is supposed to be, and hasn't been altered in any way by scammers, hackers malware people etc etc
The chances of getting a bad download are not high....and if you dont feel like following the tutorial, then just download and 'burn' the iso and install it. if by some horrible chance it is a dud download then it will do all sorts of weird things and basically will not install properly
The video above seems to be good.

All software....see my posts above

There are always some exceptions to the rule....it is possible to download a deb file from some sites.....just make sure you have a back up and also have Timeshift taking daily snapshots.
You will learn witrh time which sites you can trust and which ones you should avoid like the plague.
The members here will always steer you in the right direction should you be unsure.
about being careful if running on 64
I have no idea...I do note that the member who made that comment is 13 years old......
 
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Condobloke

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4,322
13 yrs old?....not for me.....30 would be cool (with the life knowledge that I have now)...... ;)
 


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