busybox v1.30.1 (ubuntu 1:1.30.1-4ubuntu6.3) built-in shell (ash) (SOLVED)

Tarq

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Tarq

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Code:
[email protected]:~$ inxi -Fxxxrz
System:
  Kernel: 5.4.0-70-generic x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc v: 9.3.0
  Desktop: Xfce 4.14.2 tk: Gtk 3.24.13 info: xfce4-panel wm: xfwm4
  dm: LightDM 1.30.0 Distro: Linux Mint 20 Ulyana base: Ubuntu 20.04 focal
Machine:
  Type: Portable System: Dell product: Inspiron N5110 v: N/A
  serial: <filter> Chassis: type: 8 serial: <filter>
  Mobo: Dell model: 0PPW8P v: A09 serial: <filter> BIOS: Dell v: A09
  date: 09/30/2011
CPU:
  Topology: Quad Core model: Intel Core i7-2670QM bits: 64 type: MT MCP
  arch: Sandy Bridge rev: 7 L2 cache: 6144 KiB
  flags: avx lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx bogomips: 35120
  Speed: 798 MHz min/max: 800/3100 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 798 2: 798
  3: 798 4: 798 5: 798 6: 798 7: 798 8: 798
Graphics:
  Device-1: Intel 2nd Generation Core Processor Family Integrated Graphics
  vendor: Dell driver: i915 v: kernel bus ID: 00:02.0 chip ID: 8086:0116
  Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.20.9 driver: modesetting unloaded: fbdev,vesa
  resolution: 1366x768~60Hz
  OpenGL: renderer: Mesa DRI Intel HD Graphics 3000 (SNB GT2)
  v: 3.3 Mesa 20.2.6 compat-v: 3.0 direct render: Yes
Audio:
  Device-1: Intel 6 Series/C200 Series Family High Definition Audio
  vendor: Dell driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus ID: 00:1b.0
  chip ID: 8086:1c20
  Sound Server: ALSA v: k5.4.0-70-generic
Network:
  Device-1: Realtek RTL810xE PCI Express Fast Ethernet vendor: Dell
  driver: N/A port: e000 bus ID: 05:00.0 chip ID: 10ec:8136
  Device-2: Qualcomm Atheros AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter vendor: Dell
  driver: ath9k v: kernel port: e000 bus ID: 09:00.0 chip ID: 168c:002b
  IF: wlp9s0 state: up mac: <filter>
  Device-3: Qualcomm Atheros AR3011 Bluetooth type: USB driver: btusb
  bus ID: 1-1.4:7 chip ID: 0cf3:3005
Drives:
  Local Storage: total: 698.64 GiB used: 30.73 GiB (4.4%)
  ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Hitachi model: HTS547575A9E384 size: 698.64 GiB
  speed: 3.0 Gb/s rotation: 5400 rpm serial: <filter> rev: A50A scheme: MBR
Partition:
  ID-1: / size: 337.57 GiB used: 30.73 GiB (9.1%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda5
Sensors:
  System Temperatures: cpu: 55.0 C mobo: N/A
  Fan Speeds (RPM): cpu: 0
Repos:
  No active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list
  Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/brave-browser-release.list
  1: deb [arch=amd64] https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/ stable main
  Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list
  1: deb [arch=amd64] http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main
  Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list
  1: deb http://mirrors.evowise.com/linuxmint/packages ulyana main upstream import backport
  2: deb http://mirrors.isu.net.sa/pub/ubuntu-releases focal main restricted universe multiverse
  3: deb http://mirrors.isu.net.sa/pub/ubuntu-releases focal-updates main restricted universe multiverse
  4: deb http://mirrors.isu.net.sa/pub/ubuntu-releases focal-backports main restricted universe multiverse
  5: deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ focal-security main restricted universe multiverse
  6: deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu/ focal partner
Info:
  Processes: 319 Uptime: 7h 01m Memory: 7.68 GiB used: 5.26 GiB (68.4%)
  Init: systemd v: 245 runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 9.3.0 alt: 9 Shell: bash
  v: 5.0.17 running in: xfce4-terminal inxi: 3.0.38
[email protected]:~$
 

rado84

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From the little visible information on the screen, I'd say you have bad sectors on the disk. But whether they're physical or logical - that's not clear.
 

Fanboi

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What is the solution then?
Depends. If that's physical damage (if not, the same applies except you'd creste a new partition table, repsrtition it, andd reformat said partitions), backup and replace the disk. I suggest mounting it from a live CD and mounting it in read-only (mount -o ro /dev/sdXi /mnt). Then make a clone with dd to an external backup disk. This way, you can mount the cloned image later on for file recovery.

Som good news is that you don't need an HDD/SSD to run your PC. 99.999% of distros run off a live CD and many support persistence.
 
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Tarq

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Depends. If that's physical damage (if not, the same applies except you'd creste a new partition table, repsrtition it, andd reformat said partitions), backup and replace the disk. I suggest mounting it from a live CD and mounting it in read-only (mount -o ro /dev/sdXi /mnt). Then make a clone with dd to an external backup disk. This way, you can mount the cloned image later on for file recovery.

Som good news is that you don't need an HDD/SSD to run your PC. 99.999% of distros run off a live CD and many support persistence.
I don't know what to do can you give me the steps?
 

rado84

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What is the solution then?
It depends on whether the bad sectors are physical or logical. If they're logical, you can run Linux Mint Live CD (for instance) and then try and find a linux program that fixes bad sectors. Or the harder way IMO, as Femboy suggested, reformat the storage device.
But if the bad sectors are physical (meaning many tiny holes in the disks inside the hard drive), then that's unrecoverable. You can try to clone the data to another hard drive as he suggested but there's no guarantee it will work or that it will be able to clone all the data. Best case scenario, you'll recover 80% of the data. In the physical bad sectors case, that means dead hard drive and you gotta buy a new one or better yet - an SSD because it doesn't have moveable parts, therefore physical bad sectors can't happen there.

In order to determine if the bad sectors are logical or physical, do what I said - run a live CD of any linux distro and run that program I mentioned. If it fails (might take hours to complete) to fix them, that means they're physical and you need a new storage device. If it succeeds, you're lucky and won't have to buy anything.
 

f33dm3bits

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Last time I had an input/output error message it was because that disk broke, good chances are that your disk(sda) is broken.
 

Fanboi

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Or the harder way IMO, as Femboy suggested, reformat the storage device.
The name is "Fanboi"... I have to ask:
- Genuine mistake b_b
- Freudian slip :3
 
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Tarq

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It depends on whether the bad sectors are physical or logical. If they're logical, you can run Linux Mint Live CD (for instance) and then try and find a linux program that fixes bad sectors. Or the harder way IMO, as Femboy suggested, reformat the storage device.
But if the bad sectors are physical (meaning many tiny holes in the disks inside the hard drive), then that's unrecoverable. You can try to clone the data to another hard drive as he suggested but there's no guarantee it will work or that it will be able to clone all the data. Best case scenario, you'll recover 80% of the data. In the physical bad sectors case, that means dead hard drive and you gotta buy a new one or better yet - an SSD because it doesn't have moveable parts, therefore physical bad sectors can't happen there.

In order to determine if the bad sectors are logical or physical, do what I said - run a live CD of any linux distro and run that program I mentioned. If it fails (might take hours to complete) to fix them, that means they're physical and you need a new storage device. If it succeeds, you're lucky and won't have to buy anything.
I did some tutorials but to no avail How can I tell if there is a hardware or software failure? Tell me what exactly should I do. Point me if I get lost.
09C268A1-0D52-4CB9-A144-B8392C2DC104.jpeg
 

Fanboi

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Run: badblocks /dev/sda
 
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Tarq

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When I put an exit command, this problem only shows that the code number is different
 

rado84

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The name is "Fanboi"... I have to ask:
- Genuine mistake b_b
- Freudian slip :3
Oops, sorry for that! The whole day I was thinking about a very cute femboy I saw earlier in the supermarket and apparently I've misread your nickname. :D
 

Fanboi

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You need to run it from a live CD. Every step I told you, too. Sorry, I should have been clearer. When your system is in recovery mode, it's running from RAM. Busybox is basically a mini userland (a tiny version of GNU, IIRC). Thus, there are only a limited set of commands. So you need a live CD. Try using the Mint live image if you stiill have it.
 
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Tarq

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You need to run it from a live CD. Every step I told you, too. Sorry, I should have been clearer. When your system is in recovery mode, it's running from RAM. Busybox is basically a mini userland (a tiny version of GNU, IIRC). Thus, there are only a limited set of commands. So you need a live CD. Try using the Mint live image if you stiill have it.
can you direct me
Where do I have a copy of the system on a CD?
 
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