BOYA BYM1 microphone

raman kumar

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i have bought a BOYA BYM1 microphone, which are considered one of the best microphone to record audio, but my BOYA BYM1 microphone is not giving good recording sound. what should i do ? is there any software problem or some settings have to be reconfigured?
 


JasKinasis

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If it’s an active microphone - is the battery in the microphone seated correctly?
Was the mic turned on?
Was the microphone connected to the correct port?
Is the microphone visible in alsamixer or pulse audio?
Did you try adjusting the levels for the microphone?

At the end of the day, it’s a bog standard, traditional microphone. There’s no software required and not a lot to go wrong....
Assuming it’s correctly connected to your pc’s mic port, it should just work. No drivers are needed.

The main thing would be to check that the mic’s battery is seated correctly (if it’s a dynamic mic) and ensure it’s turned on. And check the levels for the mic port on your pc.

Failing that, is there a problem with the microphone port on your pc??

Personally, for recording audio, I use a Blue “Snowball” usb microphone. I also have a decent microphone in my webcam (Logitech C922 pro-stream), which can also be used as an audio source.

Both are literally plug and play. Both work flawlessly with Linux, out of the box. And I get really clean audio from them!
 

raman kumar

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i am using debian 10 it has pulse audio installed in it. it records good when volume is very low about 15%. on increasing the volume of microphone , my speaker starts giving very bad echo-like sound and
on low volume recorded audio is not properly hearable.what should i do ? i have not seen good GUI of pulse audio.
 

JasKinasis

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That sounds like the microphone is working just fine.

The problem you’re having there is, the mic is picking up the sound from your voice AND the sound from the speakers. So what you’re getting is kind of like digital feedback.

Try plugging in some headphones, or turn down/mute the speaker to prevent the speaker output from being picked up. And/or move the mic further away from the pc.
 

JasKinasis

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From watching those videos - it sounds like you’re in a very noisy environment. It sounds like there’s a lot of traffic noise from outside. Or the fan for your pc is running fast? Or perhaps you’ve got a room-fan, or air conditioning unit running in your room.

Whatever the background noise is, it’s loud and your mic is picking everything up. So if possible, you need to reduce the amount of ambient noise.

If the noise is due to sounds from outside, you will need to try to find somewhere quieter to record, or find some way of blocking more of the noise.

If it’s noise from your air conditioner/room-fan - perhaps consider turning it off whilst recording - which may not be comfortable, but it will reduce the noise!

If it’s the fan for your pc - I’m not sure what to suggest!!

Basically, try to reduce ambient noise in your recording space as much as possible, in any ways you can.

Another thing to consider - If your mic is omnidirectional, it’s going to pick up sound from all around you.

If it is possible to switch it into unidirectional mode (some mics have this capability), then it will only pick up sounds that are pointed directly at it. That might also help reduce background noise.

So try to reduce the amount of noise as far as its practical to, because your recordings will be better for it.

If there is no way of reducing the noise in the recording space, it’s not ideal, but it’s not the end of the world. Because even if you reduce the noise, you’ll never manage to prevent all noise in your recordings.

This is where an audio editor like audacity comes into play.

If you record the audio and video at the same time, you will need to use a video editor (like openshot, or kdenlive) to separate/isolate the audio track and export it from your video clip.

Then you can edit the audio in audacity and try to reduce the amount of noise. So perhaps try some noise reduction and compression filters... Before applying noise reduction, you will need to generate a noise profile from an area of your recording where there is no talking.

Once you’ve captured a noise profile, you can apply noise reduction to your audio and reduce the noise.

If there is a lot of background noise - it may be necessary to repeat the process a few times - take a noise profile from a blank area and apply the noise reduction again to further reduce the background noise until it is pretty much eliminated.

Here’s a YouTube tutorial that will show you how to reduce noise in your audio recordings using audacity:

It also shows you how to normalise and (optionally) EQ your voice clips.

Once you’ve edited your audio, you can re-import the new audio into your video editor before rendering out the final video.

If you record your audio separately from the video, then you can record your audio clips in audacity, use the tips in the youtube tutorial to improve the sound and then import your audio and video into your video editor and render your final video.

Either way works. Two slightly different workflows, but the end result is basically the same!
 
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