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Block Root Access? New OS on VPS!

LinuxLegends

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I'm interested in engaging in controversial free speech. I am well aware that a VPS provider can literally pull the plug and shut my VPS down. And there's nothing I can do about that. However, what is more concerning is my VPS provider said they can change the root password. Which would mean potentially changing my free speech website.

I was told by a friend that if I install a new OS on the VPS (like say Debian to Ubuntu or something), it prevents root password changing. Is my friend correct?
 


f33dm3bits

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The provider still has access to the vps, so if they want they can still change the password on your vps.
 

f33dm3bits

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I forgot something, if you encrypt the root partition they won't be able to reset your root password, that is that you have to give enter a password before the root partition is unlocked.
 
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LinuxLegends

LinuxLegends

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I forgot something, if you encrypt the root partition they won't be able to reset your root password, that is that you have to give enter a password before the root partition is unlocked.
Okay thanks for the advice. So you're saying that changing the OS doesn't matter at all?
 

f33dm3bits

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Okay thanks for the advice. So you're saying that changing the OS doesn't matter at all?
You can change the os but if the root partition isn't encrypted since the provider has access to the vm they can just boot into rescue mode or from the cd and then reset the password. If you have the option to do your own installation by booting from an iso which you yourself downloaded and then encrypt your root partition during installation that would be better. You never know how a hosting provider setup their deployment that they create some sort of backdoor during the installation/deployment process.
 
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LinuxLegends

LinuxLegends

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You can change the os but if the root partition isn't encrypted since the provider has access to the vm they can just boot into rescue mode or from the cd and then reset the password. If you have the option to do your own installation by booting from an iso which you yourself downloaded and then encrypt your root partition during installation that would be better. You never know how a hosting provider setup their deployment that they create some sort of backdoor during the installation/deployment process.
Hey thanks so much for the information. I am impressed by the knowledge on this forum.

I have been searching for a guide now online on how to install a linux .iso without using the VPS vendor's tools/GUI at all. But each guide keeps going back to that. Is it possible to do this entirely from the SSH command line?
 

f33dm3bits

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I have been searching for a guide now online on how to install a linux .iso without using the VPS vendor's tools/GUI at all. But each guide keeps going back to that. Is it possible to do this entirely from the SSH command line?
No you can't do a full os installation through ssh because ssh isn't availabe during installation.What I did once was because I didn't like the vps vendor installation was to ask them if I could do my own installation. They then booted the requested iso for me and it allowed me to to my own installation.
 
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Fanboi

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Some distros can run from an image or local directory, like TinyCore. So you can, in that sense, install while still live. Problem is that, as @f33dm3bits points out, it's not safe witjout encryption (encrypt your sensitive data, too, btw). Chrooting into a dir structure (or mounted image) is all anyone has to do from a live ISO or a recovery partition (or the base OS in this case). Hence needing encryption.

Just to add: if you know what you're doing, you can do a bootstrap install a'la Arch, see: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Install_Arch_Linux_from_existing_Linux
 
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