Been trying to get a Linux install working today

Parafaragaramus

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Downloaded an ubuntu and then mint distro today put them on a usb and was able to load them. Went through the install process to put Linux on a separate usb and two other external hard drives at different times and removed the original usb. went into the bios to boot from said drive and each time I get no operating system found. messed with some settings but no change. boots into windows fine every time. Trying to make a mobile Linux that I can take with me. I know I'm very new to this but it's been frustrating me all day that I can get a "Try Ubuntu" to work but not a proper install. Assume that I know nothing and I'll try to keep up. Thanks for the help if you need any automotive advice I can give my opinion on that.
 


Bartman

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Have a look this may be helpful.
 

Brickwizard

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Welcome, First DISABLE windows quick start in the BIOS [usually found in the battery settings] otherwise it will continue to boot windows.
 
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Parafaragaramus

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dancaer69

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Seems that you need to have root rights, so try to open nautilus as root(I don't use it but I think that has this option) or use terminal with sudo.
Code:
sudo cp /path/to/source/file /path/to/destination/directory/
you can right click on the file you need to copy in nautilus, choose copy and then paste the path in terminal using ctl+shift+v.
 

Brickwizard

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This is my basic install instructions, you can use them with a couple of changes,
First if you want to boot your persistent pen drive on any PC/Laptop you come across then when asked choose legacy boot as older machines do not have EFI

secondly, use a good quality pen drive min 32 gb preferably over 60 gb for your target drive and a good quality one of 16gb preferably to burn the ISO to.

Thirdly when it comes to the partitioning stage, use the drop-down box and make sure you choose the correct blank pen drive, do not partition it yourself let the installer do it,

Mint is probably the easiest to install

More care is needed when making a persistent usb if you make a wrong choice you could wipe your complete machine and its drive,
How Do I Install Linux (A General Guide) • Linux Tips
 
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Turn off TPM in your bios settings, you might need to set up a bios password first, then turn off TPS, save the settings, you may also need to put your current boot option to the end of the list of boot options also in bios and save, otherwise the first boot option listed will boot and if its not your intended drive then you wont be happy, also, turning off TPM is important, if not you will not boot into your new ISO / drive.
Even Windows which is signed by microsoft can refuse to boot with TPM on, its a rondabout way of saying keep windows on your system,
and if your not in the know it wont even install, then you go the pc repair man, who miraculously gets windows installed, money changes hands.
 

CrazedNerd

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it's looking like the BIOS is an issue here, so try to adjust it as others recommend. Not every BIOS is very good...the last motherboard i had had an "award winning BIOS", but for some reason it was not flexible in terms of letting me run separate windows and linux hard drives: if i switched to one, it not switch back to the other one after 3 attempts of setting the resetting BIOS, so it wasn't worth it to do that, i was really frustrated.
 
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it's looking like the BIOS is an issue here, so try to adjust it as others recommend. Not every BIOS is very good...the last motherboard i had had an "award winning BIOS", but for some reason it was not flexible in terms of letting me run separate windows and linux hard drives: if i switched to one, it not switch back to the other one after 3 attempts of setting the resetting BIOS, so it wasn't worth it to do that, i was really frustrated.
What computer was that on, so others can avoid the same issue.
 

CrazedNerd

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What computer was that on, so others can avoid the same issue.
It was a GIGABYTE motherboard with DDR3 ram slots and an LGA 1151 socket, i would look up the order and tell you which one but Newegg erases order histories after a certain number of years. I've been doing a lot of boot device stuff [where i have to keep switching it] with the newer ROG motherboards, and i have not had any problems whatsoever.
 
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