automatic backup service for Linux, why not?

Tolkem

Member
Hi everyone! Hope you're all having a nice life! :)

It'd be nice if one day Linux could create restore points without needing additional software and/or user intervention, something like Windows' VSS - volume shadow copy service - I do remember reading once about some guy's project related to this, can't find it now though. I know cron can offer a similar approach, but then users have to know what to do and I guess it's ok, I myself use it but those who just arrived at Linux won't have a clue and frankly, it's just not the same. I think that would be a massive improvement for Linux in general. I have to admit this is one windows' feature I miss from time to time and don't get me wrong, I love Linux and I don't think I'll ever use the MS OS again, at least not as my main system since I do have a windows 7 VM for certain tasks Linux can handle mostly due to software being not available but for windows only. I'm not expert and the reason behind this not being implemented in Linux might go beyond my undertanding, however, I can't help but wonder, why is it we don't we have a similar feature?
 


Tolkem

Member
You should check out @wizardfromoz's ever-expanding tutorial on Timeshift... here. It is now included with many distros, and it can be added to others. I think it is the Linux solution you are looking for. :D

Cheers
I know of timeshift and have used it before, right now I use Lucky backup and some cron jobs for other stuff. I think you missunderstood my post, I know there are many backup solutions under Linux; timeshift, grsync, systemback, lucky backup and a few others. What I meant is that I think a VSS approach would be a great improvement in Linux; having a service running in the background taking regular snapshots of the system should anything go wrong users can simply "go back in time" in one click, just the way it works in windows. And yes, I know tools like timeshift can do something similar, but users do have to tell it to do it otherwise it won't, while having a VSS like service will do it for them automatically. It's not a big deal ... I guess ... I've been using cron jobs for some time now to backup my data and recently started using lucky backup but still, I just wonder, and again, the reason behind this not being implemented is probably beyond my understanding, however, why not?

Cheers! :)
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Valid questions, I feel :)

I have a couple of pots on the boil here currently, but will be back soon with some more detail - but one possible answer on "why there is not" might be

Security.

I will flesh that out more soon.

Meantime, have you taken a look at Back in Time?

https://backintime.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

One advantage it has over Timeshift is that it allows you to store your snapshots remotely via SSH, also includes an option for SSH encryption.

Cheers for now

Wizard
 

randomnixer

New Member
It's up to each distro to implement this type of thing, there's no shortage of amazing tools and methods, though no enforceable standard either. It's simply and fundamentally not how gnu/Linux and open source works. TONS of great options anyway, if a given distro doesn't include it stock, then yep, it's up to individual users. Windows restore pts are certainly not the end all, be all by any stretch. I've been M$ free for several years but do remember times when attempting to use a restore pt certainly didn't have the desired effect. Did not fix the problem. There's also no shortage of freeware and/or open source tools that will do a better job of something on the windows platform, than what M$ provides out of box.

My personal preference is rsync + compression. Simple, versatile and totally effective, can be automated via crontab, script, systemd unit file etc etc. Also have a bash alias setup so I can run a backup whenever desired too. Think bottom-line, like everything gnu/nix it's about choice (with no shortage of good to great options readily available.) The biggy distro's in the everything gui'ey, everything automagically done for users ... newb friendliest niche all do tend to ship with whichever graphical backup/restore features in place. For me, not interested in using those and much prefer choosing and setting things up as I like. A stock backup solution, would almost certainly just be something else I'd have to disable/remove. Though my preference is minimal Debian netinstalls, base + standard system tools, all else is built up from there according to taste.
 

Tolkem

Member
Meantime, have you taken a look at Back in Time?
Yes, I have, couple of years ago.

I have a couple of pots on the boil here currently, but will be back soon with some more detail - but one possible answer on "why there is not" might be

Security.
Yeah, I too think that might be one of the reasons. Also, it might has something to do with licensing stuff, like technology behind this being on private hands and all.

It's up to each distro to implement this type of thing, there's no shortage of amazing tools and methods, though no enforceable standard either. It's simply and fundamentally not how gnu/Linux and open source works. TONS of great options anyway, if a given distro doesn't include it stock, then yep, it's up to individual users. Windows restore pts are certainly not the end all, be all by any stretch. I've been M$ free for several years but do remember times when attempting to use a restore pt certainly didn't have the desired effect. Did not fix the problem. There's also no shortage of freeware and/or open source tools that will do a better job of something on the windows platform, than what M$ provides out of box
Been there. It's certainly true that windows' restore points sometimes don't have the desired effect, that is, it doesn't solve/fix the problem, however, I think it has to do with the way that OS works more than VSS being the culprit, since Linux has a better workflow I believe the result would be completely different; better and accurate.

Yes, there certainly are many good backup solutions out there, all of them offering a tone of handy features, maybe even better than the ones VSS has to offer.

Look people, I'm not saying this is a "crucial" feature nor that it makes Windows any better than Linux, not a f****** chance! not in a million years! I guess all I'm trying to say is, is it really that difficult to do this in Linux? I mean, from a technical point of view, what would it take to port such a feature to Linux? Maybe this whole topic is a dead end and we'll never know the whys.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
I guess all I'm trying to say is, is it really that difficult to do this in Linux? I mean, from a technical point of view, what would it take to port such a feature to Linux?
I guess the ones who would have the answers and most likely would know are / is the developers of the Linux distros.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Mate, I'd like to put a sad and happy above but I think I can only put one (unless I cast a spell).

I could flesh out what I was saying above, but I think you know enough to fill in the blanks without me feeling a need to air my cyber literary voice. :)

I'll give you an example of what I found 5 years ago, and then link that to what you are talking about.

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/548703/new-to-linux-newbies-gurus-not-so-newbies-all-distros-tips-lore/page-6

The main thrust of my enquiry on

sudo

was answered by Todd C. Miller who is the maintainer of sudo for Linux. #68 through #89 indicate the controversy I caused.

But Todd was eminently approachable to answer (and endorse) what I was looking for.

I am also in occasional contact with the Devs of Peppermint OS and one called Peach OSI.

None of these people act like gods. They are not aloof.

I haven't the time for this myself with my other commitments, but if you want answers, track them down and ask.

I would devour any answers you get, if you share them back here.

Cheers

Chris
 

Members online


Top