Are you using linux? If yes, why?

sp331yi

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+1 --
if i go to google and search for Ubuntu I find a zillion posts about the same problem and no answer. ..
+1 --
Slackware is basically a pain in the butt . . . You will learn a hell of a lot.
@HAL_2000 -- take a look at IceWM, as a suggestion.

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ARios Projekt

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Well, I used to use macos and windows, I feel linux like the best and the worst from both worlds and I do like it.

On macos, if something happened, to be honest, I just blame Apple and I get used to it until they fix their issue, something similar on Windows, on Linux I feel like I can do something and it feels good, is like when something happen to my car, instead of bitching around I just take my time to read the manual to find out how to over come it, same here, plus the community that is quite awesome.

I moved to just because I'm kind of curious, I'm not a developer or anything related, same with my family.
 

Nelson Muntz

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Hmm good question.

I just tried Linux one day and started using Linux no particular reason.

I do like Linux better than Windows although I never had any complaints with Windows until Windows 8 and Windows 10 I have on computers around the house.

OH Well I guess it really doesn't matter why the important thing is I'm using Linux and like using Linux because it works for what I use my computer for.
 

HAL_2000

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You are right. 2001 was written by Arthur C. Clarke and the film done by Stanley Kubrik.
If you look *real* close at my avatar, the 2000 is taken from the Windows 2000 logo. Clarke's HAL, of course, was an HAL 9000 (Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer) unit. Douglas Rain, a Canadian actor, provided HAL's voice. Of course, HAL 2000 is far more mundane.

Both HAL and Windows tend to make errors from time to time.

And thanks for the rundown on Slackware.

Sounds like a real hands on distro.

As it is, I am still exploring different distros, which is pretty easy since I have a lot of old machines and spare HDDs lying around. Slackware sounds like it might not be suited to this particular mission. Some have suggested Zorin, Mint or even Puppy, but none of those have matched the ability to operate at speed with a small amount of RAM like LXLE or XPQ4.

Three distros are my next targets: BSD and AntiX and it's brother, MX v 19.
 

HAL_2000

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Yes, I've heard great things about IceWM

Then I heard about LXP, which integrates IceWM into it, and would be very interested in loading it. How do you load something with a filename like this?

lxp-setup-0.2-1b

One downside, of course, is that the last update I see on this distro is 2008 or so.

Look Win XP Desktop: icewm+idesk+xfe
 

HAL_2000

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Loren, here's an interesting aside, re: XP. I had been trying to burn a DVD and was making coaster after coaster with Win 7 CD-BURNER freeware. I still have a HDD loaded with XP for an old laptop. Swapped out the 7 for XP and used NERO and the copies ran through without a hitch.

I'm sure there's a useful lesson in there some where. Thanks for the XP theme info.
 

HAL_2000

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Freedom.

Actually it was driver madness with Windows '95 and then '98 which nudged me over the edge.


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Agreed, but have noticed a marked difference with respect to device drivers / device recognition between distros. The Ubuntu-based OS's readily recognized wifi, sound and webcam devices.

The Debian-based distros are maddening, particularly older WiFi minicards. But yes, Windows and hardware manufacturers have been eradicating device drivers from their support websites.
 

sp331yi

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The Debian-based distros are maddening, particularly older WiFi minicards. But yes, Windows and hardware manufacturers have been eradicating device drivers from their support websites.
I agree, esp for Debian per se. AntiX is not so frustrating, to me, at least.

Use NERO, perhaps?
AFAIK it's not a viable option with GNU/Linux. Besides, the ISOs are sub-par, IMO.
 

HAL_2000

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@Vrai

"Actually it was driver madness with Windows '95 and then '98 which nudged me over the edge."

I haven't been able to log in very often but here is a case in point on that drivers issue. Had been trying to wake up the WiFi card for an old Acer 5630. Under Windows 7, using straight driver installs, and multiple attempts to emulate XP or Vista so those drivers might work, the MiniCard, and for that matter, the PCMCIA WiFi add-on card refused to be recognized.

Loading Linux LXLE 64bit woke the add-on card immediately. It also recognized the sound circuit and webcam. Love it.
 

jglen490

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25+ years ...

Good habits are hard to break :cool:

In reality, wife and I were sharing an old computer with some old Windows on it. I found a used, low-spec laptop. A friend I was taking some classes with, was using Linux and suggested I give it a try. So he gave me this stack of floppies that seemed to be 3 feet high (obviously not). I installed it, found some books and other resources, and I was on my way. Later, I found a copy of Red Hat 5.2 in a thrift shop. It had a real and well written book, a CD, and one install floppy. And most important it had a really neat (for the time) GUI - and it made so much sense. So fast forward a couple of decades, experience with several Linux and BSD distros, and about 14 years of Kubuntu and here we are. I still have that boxed set Red Hat, and I still smile when I look at it.
 

f33dm3bits

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I was tired of windows, wanted to learn something new, I had a lot of free time, it looked cool, and opensource and free software.
 


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