appimage flatpak ,snap or other

KGIII

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I tend to compile my own package.

Ain't nothing wrong with that. I compile stuff but generally only when I need to.

I also get a strange, perhaps sadistic, sense of satisfaction when I compile my own software. I can watch software compile far longer than any human should pay attention to it.
 


dos2unix

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I can watch software compile far longer than any human should pay attention to it.
Or watch a progress bar take hours to go across my screen. :)
 

gvisoc

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I can watch software compile far longer than any human should pay attention to it.
Sometimes I do that in a cafe, with an “ugly” laptop, and wearing a hoodie, for people-that-watch-too-much-TV to freak out.

Double satisfaction.
 

Tolkem

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KGIII

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wizardfromoz

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I have only just come today to reading this Thread and find it quite interesting. :)

@Leonardo_B the following is perhaps a little off-topic, but if you allow it, and understand that what I am saying is something that may help people choosing to use Snaps, then it is useful and serves a purpose.

I'm not just hijacking your Thread :), I don't do that.

@JasKinasis - mate I know you wrote this closer to 4 months ago than not, but do you know that there is a simple way to alter the start and stop jobs for snap daemon to your liking, making startup and shutdown times quicker?

On my laptop, running Debian - snapd added well over a minute to my boot times. Which is completely unacceptable!

It simply involves tweaking the content of

/etc/systemd/system.conf

... saving that and rebooting.

In that file, under

[Manager]

are a couple of lines usually reading

Code:
#DefaultTimeoutStartSec=90s
#DefaultTimeoutStopSec=90s

... relating to Start Jobs and Stop Jobs.

All you have to do is uncomment (remove the hash) whichever of those lines applies, in your case Start, and change the 90 secs to what you want, eg 10 secs (I do both)

You would know better than I whether you can go to single digits, or even zero (0) .

Cheers

Wiz
 

Thunderpants

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An appimage solved a problem I experienced. The Xubuntu 20.04 LTS repository version of VLC randomly crashed when changing channels on my USB DVB-T2 tuner stick. The appimage build of VLC was unaffected and worked reliably.

Although I prefer to use the official repositories, appimages can sometimes be useful. Disk space is cheap these days.
 

JasKinasis

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I have only just come today to reading this Thread and find it quite interesting. :)

@Leonardo_B the following is perhaps a little off-topic, but if you allow it, and understand that what I am saying is something that may help people choosing to use Snaps, then it is useful and serves a purpose.

I'm not just hijacking your Thread :), I don't do that.

@JasKinasis - mate I know you wrote this closer to 4 months ago than not, but do you know that there is a simple way to alter the start and stop jobs for snap daemon to your liking, making startup and shutdown times quicker?



It simply involves tweaking the content of

/etc/systemd/system.conf

... saving that and rebooting.

In that file, under

[Manager]

are a couple of lines usually reading

Code:
#DefaultTimeoutStartSec=90s
#DefaultTimeoutStopSec=90s

... relating to Start Jobs and Stop Jobs.

All you have to do is uncomment (remove the hash) whichever of those lines applies, in your case Start, and change the 90 secs to what you want, eg 10 secs (I do both)

You would know better than I whether you can go to single digits, or even zero (0) .

Cheers

Wiz

I’d still prefer to keep it completely off my system. I view Snapcraft as a terrible solution to the problem of packaging for multiple distros.

I’d rather build and install from source, from GitHub (or other source control), if native packages are not available. Much cleaner and requires less peripheral crap clogging up my system. I’m a developer anyway, so I’m happy having extra libraries/SDKs/toolchains on my PC. At least it doesn’t have any impact on my boot times!

I’m happy to use the odd app-image from time to time too. But only as a temporary measure.

But flat-pack and snapcraft are just awful IMO! Not on my machine, ha ha!

If Debian ever start forcing snapcraft on users - as Canonical have done with Ubuntu, then I’ll be looking for a new distro to call home. Or I’ll be rolling my own!
 

Tolkem

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It simply involves tweaking the content of

/etc/systemd/system.conf

... saving that and rebooting.

In that file, under

[Manager]

are a couple of lines usually reading
I tried this(in Endeavour), commented out those lines, changed the value to 10, restart was real fast, but upon reboot I got an error message about partitions and something else, and was dropped to an emergency prompt. I was able to solve it by commenting those lines again. Maybe I should try a different value. Just wanted to share that. I think, since this laptop uses an HDD, not a SSD, 10s is probably not enough time for partitions to be read and mounted by the system.
 

wizardfromoz

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That's interesting, friend, and regrets on any inconvenience. I have Endeavour in my stable, I'll try it out.

Avagudweegend

Wiz
 

f33dm3bits

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The default repositories and the AUR because they provide all I need.
A recent update broke my the Teams AUR package on my system so I decided I would try the Flatpak version. I'm actually quite satisfied, I like the sandboxing idea Flatpaks have and Flatpaks don't seem to be able to deal with system themes because of that but I figured out how to get the theme I want with them. I now have replaced the user applications on my system with Flatpak versions for the ones I get the feeling Flatpak is a better fit. I also tried Steam as a Flatpak but but I found that running Steam as a Flatpak isn't ideal, but I now have 33 Flatpaks installed on my system.
 
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