Alternative window manager?

etcetera

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I can't deal with Gnome after what they did to it, don't really like KDE, so-so about XFCE... I miss the old school XFWM (X-Windows Feeble Windows Manager). It was so simple and light.

My main thing is easily configurable virtual desktop, I usually configure a 1x4 switcher.

Want to go with Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based distro. Need the apt package manager without any new and interesting innovations.
I already got the Redhat tree covered but need something from the Debian/Buntu family.
 


I need minimalist with the virtual desktop and an on-screen switcher as well as the ability to program keyboard shortcuts, for example F1 takes to virtual screen1, or cntrl-> will shift to the virtual desktop to the right.

I can't think of what I really need outside of that. That and the point to raise window ability.
 
I think you should try a tiling window manager like i3wm. It is all a bit strange at first but its like learning to type with 10 fingers instead of two - you will never want to go back ;)
It will take you about 2 hours to get used to it, and after that you can not understand why anyone would want to use the mouse to manage their windows.
 
I need minimalist with the virtual desktop and an on-screen switcher as well as the ability to program keyboard shortcuts, for example F1 takes to virtual screen1, or cntrl-> will shift to the virtual desktop to the right.

I can't think of what I really need outside of that. That and the point to raise window ability.
For window managers, perhaps check:
and try a few. Trying them is probably the most helpful way to find out what suits you.
Personally, it's twm, dwm and icewm ... old school, all moderately configured away from defaults.
 
Interesting. All enticing choices. I will them all, one by one. Yep, I remember twm. I thought it was an interesting upgrade from mwm.

I used fwvm for a long time. I had it mostly keyboard-driven.
I personally don't get the improvements in the newer or latest-greatest WM, they seem like a step back, too complicated with too many options and lacking features I found critical. Say gnome for example, I have to make too many changes to it to make look palatable to me.
 
Interesting. All enticing choices. I will them all, one by one. Yep, I remember twm. I thought it was an interesting upgrade from mwm.

I used fwvm for a long time. I had it mostly keyboard-driven.
I personally don't get the improvements in the newer or latest-greatest WM, they seem like a step back, too complicated with too many options and lacking features I found critical. Say gnome for example, I have to make too many changes to it to make look palatable to me.
It's helpful to differentiate between a window manager, and a Desktop Environment.

A window manager, such as most of those on the wikipedia page linked in post #5 is basically a small executable that manages the windows by positioning them, enabling them to move about, resizing them, maybe providing icons and menus, and not much else if anything, (but note the caveat at the end).

A Desktop Environment like gnome or KDE includes a window manager, but beyond that includes numerous programs which are over and above the relatively simple function of a window manager in order to enable an enhanced fully-featured experience for the user.

Here is a brief comparison between what the window managers twm and icewm supply, compared to what gnome supplies for its Desktop Environment (DE):
Code:
apt show twm <TAB>
twm
The output from the tab completion shows the executable window manager twm as a single executable.

Code:
apt show icewm <TAB>
icewm               icewm-common        icewm-experimental  icewm-lite
The output shows the few icewm programs for the window manager, only two of which are needed to run icewm, the first and second.

Code:
apt show gnome <TAB>
Display all 182 possibilities? (y or n)
gnome                                     gnome-dust-icon-theme                     gnome-paint                               gnome-shell-extension-runcat
<snip>
For the gnome Desktop Environment there are on this system 182 programs with the gnome name in them. I've spared the reader the large output they can investigate for themselves.

About 30 gnome packages/applications, form the core of gnome and are needed to get a basic gnome DE. However the fully featured DE includes more.

The gnome DE, in addition to the window manager, (the default one being mutter), includes a file manager, numerous GUI front-ends for services including for network managing, for a sound server, for system daemons like journald and packagekit, for video viewing. There's a GUI text editor, a web browser, document viewer, image viewer, GUIs for system analysis tools, image manipulation programs, games, and heaps more that can be seen from the apt command above. There are numerous other programs that don't have "gnome" in their name which also form part of gnome's DE which can be found here: https://apps.gnome.org/

The caveat in relation to window managers, is that some which began as primarily programs for window management, did accumulate functions which started to make them look like they were on the way to becoming DEs themselves. The main one in that respect in my experience was Enlightenment.
 


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