A Response to DT's Recent Video

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https://invidious.tiekoetter.com/watch?v=1EIpek60rs0
While I'm nowhere near as experienced in Linux as he is, he does make some points I found interesting, such as a lack of customization (something I've experienced in Mint XFCE). Because of that, I wish I was a Linux user in the early days of GTK so I can see the stark difference he's talking about. It also made me think about how Void Linux (based on what I've read) is one of the few modern distros that purposely went the independent route, whereas so many other distros these days are just variations of Arch or Debian. Another thing that comes to mind is the made-for-linux browsers (Konqueror, Midori, Epiphany, etc) aren't gaining anywhere near as much traction as Firefox and Chromium. Don't me get wrong, Arch, Debian, Firefox, and Chromium all have a solid track record, and the reasons for forking them are valid. However, when you don't have much variety to offer (at least in those areas), you inevitability begin to stagnate as a result. IMO (and feel free to disagree with me on this if you like), I think where this stagnation might be coming from is the developers of distros, DEs, programs, etc are trying to get Linux to appeal to Windows users so it makes the transition easier, and as much as I like trying to get Windows users to become Linux users, the problem is Windows users just want an OS that works and they don't have to configure too much. It seems as though DT was comparing old school Linux to the Wild West where developers often took more risks, broke new ground, and went against the grain, and to him (and you old school users as well), that's what made it fun. While it's natural to become accustomed to something familiar or a familiar workflow, this kind of video also tells us we need to break up the monotony so we can make things fun again. It is subconsciously difficult to get out of our comfort zones so we can try new things and challenge ourselves, but at the same time, that can be fun and exciting when you develop the confidence to do so. Because of that, I encourage you to try a new way to use Linux, as I will do so as well.
 


f33dm3bits

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Some changes are easier to get used to than others and the older we get the harder it is to adjust to change, yes things have gotten more complicated and easier at the same time but the world we live in has gotten more complicated over the years as as well. We can only go forward or we can always switch to a BSD when we get tired of Linux ;)
 

f33dm3bits

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True, but why bother when you make Linux be what you want it to?
No reason to switch just something different/new for those who don't like the what Linux has changed to or is heading towards to. Also if something becomes a big enough problem with Linux or any other opensource project someone will fork or someone will create a new solution to solve the lack or a problem of something.
 
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No reason to switch just something different/new for those who don't like the what Linux has changed to or is heading towards to. Also if something becomes a big enough problem with Linux or any other opensource project someone will fork or someone will create a new solution to solve the lack or a problem of something.

The problem with BSD is it's mostly for servers. FreeBSD was made with the desktop in mind, but it's developed by a tight-knit community, which means it has far less support than Linux does (which itself still doesn't have as much support as it should). That's not to say some BSD OS couldn't break the mold and really become something one day. While I haven't tried Void yet (and I'm just going to try it, rather than use it as a daily driver, because rolling releases tend to break frequently from what I've read online), I'm sure it will set an example of what path Linux should be going down rather than where it's headed now.
 

f33dm3bits

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The problem with BSD is it's mostly for servers.
I have run server distributions on my desktop and they work fine for workstation if you don't needed the newest software. Also I would think that BSD is also good enough for the desktop since there are BSD variants made for desktop use, ie: GhostBSD and DragonFly BSD.
 

dos2unix

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I have run server distributions on my desktop and they work fine for workstation if you don't needed the newest software.

It's not my daily driver right now, but it has been in the past.
 

wizardfromoz

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Thanks for sharing, David, I will watch the vid on my tomorrow, as I have Mint Xfce in my stable. ;)

On

...because rolling releases tend to break frequently from what I've read online

Not IME. I run 17 Rolling Releases out of my 84, and 13 of them are Arch-based. They are eminently stable.

My oldest is a Manjaro that dates back to 2017, always updated and scarcely a blip of a problem. No need to upgrade when there is no EOL. Lol.

I have 15 - 20 buntu-based distros I have to retire EOL in the next few weeks and I have been thinking of taking Void for a run.

I'll probably try a Cinnamon or Xfce.

Cheers

Wiz
 

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My first foray into Linux was with Ubuntu back in the early 2000's, I remember being mesmerized with the customization options of GNOME 2, and the outlandish effects of Compiz, it was indeed the wild west in a way, developers at the time were experimenting with all sorts of crazy new ideas and things to see what would stick.

Technically, you could kind of experience some of what GNOME 2 offered through MATE; XFCE itself is wildly customizable with the right know-how, but I have never really used either MATE or XFCE in any meaningful capacity.

As the years have passed however, I can not really say that I would necessarily wish to go back to that epoch, I enjoy the stability, consistency and general feel of modern GNOME, and extensions allow me to customize it to my liking.

P.S: Rolling-Release Distributions need not necessarily be unstable by virtue of being rolling-release, though the term is often associated with bleeding-edge (like Arch Linux, receiving software as soon as it is released with little or sometimes no testing involved).
 
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Not IME. I run 17 Rolling Releases out of my 84, and 13 of them are Arch-based. They are eminently stable.

My oldest is a Manjaro that dates back to 2017, always updated and scarcely a blip of a problem. No need to upgrade when there is no EOL. Lol.

Thanks for the reassurance. I'm more willing to try them out now.
 

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