What Is Linux

Discussion in 'Beginner Tutorials' started by Rob, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. Saptarshi Nag

    Saptarshi Nag Member

    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Do you want unix or linux?what type of linux do you want debian,ubuntu,mint,fedora or anything else?
    Go to the official website of corresponding linux distro and you can download it without any cost.
    for ubuntu- http://www.ubuntu.com/download
    for linux mint- http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
    etc.

    rex and DevynCJohnson like this.
  2. labrat

    labrat Active Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
  3. ssy

    ssy New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    This may be the begining of my learning way, may that I will keep! Thanks for you patience.
  4. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

    Messages:
    1,379
    Likes Received:
    1,094
    Trophy Points:
    113
    rdarw likes this.
  5. Not_Here_11

    Not_Here_11 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I'm starting with only a brief experience 15 years ago with Linux/Solaris.
    My goal is to learn again so that I end up with a dual-boot laptop.

    So, here goes....
  6. Boxchevy91

    Boxchevy91 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Brand new to the Linux world... so much to do where do I start?????
  7. Saptarshi Nag

    Saptarshi Nag Member

    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    18
    It's always advised to learn it by using it.So you start using it after following the installation guide.Then move around the beginners' forum and learn it and for any problem do not hesitate to post there. :)
  8. gr8tD

    gr8tD New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Rob, i honestly commend you on this great explanation, now i have an head start on all what Linux is all about and with this lucid explanation of yours i believe am in one of the best places and in good hands to kick start my Linux knowledge and boost IT career, cos all i had ever known is MS OS, but with all have hard Linux will help me do or the length it will let me go am ready to exolpre
    rex and DevynCJohnson like this.
  9. Eddie G.

    Eddie G. New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thanks for the explanation! Thsi will help me to get the word out to other people I expose to it. To those who are new to Linux my advice is simple. Before diving in feet first? R-E-A-D!!!! Read as much as you can on the particular area of Linux you're interested in. If you're just looking to get familiar with it? then DistroWatch is a perfect place to "see" and get a feel for what distros offer what apps and packages etc. Eventually the time will come when you're going to have to install it. And while there are various ways to do it?..I feel the best ways are the tried & true methods: Download the .iso of the distro you want - Burn the .iso to a CD (sometimes you'll have to use a DVD because the .iso is larger than a CD's 700MB limit!) or the second method which is a little more technical and "hands on" is - Download and install "Unetbootin".....from there you can use any of the links built in to Unetbootin to install the distro you want, OR you could download the .iso you want and then "point" to it in Unetbootin and install it that way. No matter which method you use a few warnings are in order. First, BACK UP YOUR DATA! I can't tell you how many times someone has said to me that their machine lost all of their pictures, movies, documents, weblinks etc. because they tried to install Linux and in the process wrote over their old OS. So before you do ANYTHING backup your data (I prefer an external 1TB USB hard drive....enough room for everything and portable!) and second? after you've made sure your data is safe, if you screw up an installation you can always do it again....don't be afraid to screw up or make mistakes, your data is safe, and there's no way you can entirely "destroy' your machine from a basic install so GO FOR IT! Don't be overwhelmed by the number of options you have, from the icons you use to the placement of your "taskbar" or maybe even NO taskbar at all! The sky's the limit with Linux, the more you use it? the less you'll like the "forced interface" of other OS'es...(not going to mention any names..but they know who they are!...LoL!) Welcome all to the wonderful world of true "Computing Freedom"!
  10. sudlin

    sudlin New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi Rob,
    I loved the part when the kernel and GNU programs combined to make Linux.
    I really appreciate your explanation...
  11. CodeTurk

    CodeTurk New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I found this text very useful. I found it helpful to start with linux I want to ask , but I do not know where to start.
    ---------------
    backtrack
    What is it for? ??


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Many thanks to the founder of this page....
  12. sudlin

    sudlin New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi CodeTurk ,
    If you want to start with Linux, then you just have to go to the official websites of any distribution of Linux you prefer to use (e.g Ubuntu, Debian, Opensuse, Linux mint etc. ), download the distro free of cost, follow the installation guide and install it on your pc. And you can start doing whatever you wish for as in case of any other OS and you will get to know and learn more about it once you play with it. And for any queries you can move round the Linux forums and feel free to ask.
    I am sure you will enjoy working with Linux...:)
  13. rdarw

    rdarw New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    And rewriting program language brought a brand speed of an os.
  14. rdarw

    rdarw New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Copter being new to Linux is okay.
  15. rdarw

    rdarw New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Your a weird blog.
  16. Yara

    Yara New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hello,
    I'm new to Linux..
    can anyone help me answer this question:
    What's Linux characteristics and its use by a group of clients
    Thanks
    DevynCJohnson likes this.
  17. Eddie G.

    Eddie G. New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hello Yara, when you say "clients" do you mean in a network / server atmosphere Or are you talking about individual people who happen to call on your as their Tech Support? Because the characteristics would be vastly different depending on what those people would be doing with their Linux PC's / laptops (movies, music, photos, file-sharing etc.), as opposed to what a business /enterprise would have as it's goal using Linux (stability, connectivity, security, pricing, compatibility with legacy applications, printintg etc.)
    Yara likes this.
  18. Yara

    Yara New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hello Eddie, thanks for replying, I appreciate your help as I really need to know the answer for that question.
    The "clients" here is in a network / server atmosphere.
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2014
  19. Eddie G.

    Eddie G. New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hey Yara, you're welcome! I find telling and helping others get to know Linux makes the world a better place, free from licensing nightmares, and "exclusive" software and hardware that can only come from one vendor! But to answer your question: The characteristics of Linux in a server / client / network environment are almost the same as in Windows, the big differences are that the software needed for "building" your servers is available right from the machine you're working on and don't require you to "Insert CD" or to have a License Key ready! For example, you can install CEntOS as a server (Community ENTerprise Operating System in case you're wondering about it's name!), and on that machine you can download the Apache Web Server package (httpd) the FTP Server package (ftpd or tfpd), a Linux version of Active Directory and LDAP (389 Directory Server) and anything else server related....such as SQL/Database Servers or just a plain 'ol File Server! The benefits of this are that you know what's on the machine, you'll hardly ever have to reboot it, and it is safe, and can be made safer by learning and enhancing the SELinux tools built-in to CEntOS (which for all intents and purposes is really "Red Hat Linux"!) And bear in mind that you're not limited to using only one version of a package. In other words if you wanted to install a database/SQL server you don't have to use NoSQL you could go with MariaDB....or something else SQL-related and this is the same with quite a few apps out there in the World Wide Web, from office suites (OpenOffice....LibreOffice.....Kingston....etc.) to network monitoring and logging, its all available for you to install as many times on as many machines as you need. My personal love for Linux stems from the fateful day a server "died" and unbeknownst to any of us that worled in the LAN room the backups had "died" about a month or two before. So yes, we all lost our jobs and I swore I'd never use Windows software again. I must have scoured the web for almost 6 months looking for alternate operating systems, (as a matter of fact that's exactly what I typed into a Google search "alternative computer operating systems" and right underneath the IBM...Apple...and Unix links Linux showed up....(I assume that now Linux might be at the top of a search like that?..I dunno LoL!) You're best bet to get into Linux and the administration side of things would be to find a book to order online that can introduce you properly to it. One such book is "Linux Administration: A Beginner's Guide" by Wale Soyinka. This is what I used to get a handle on the more "cut & dried" things regarding installation, creating files and directories, and troubleshooting. The next piece of advice I'd give you would be to get ahold of at least 2 PC's one for using as a server, and one for a client. (If you can't get two then using one with a VM is also fine, you're just looking to explore the inner workings of a server and its connectivity to other clients on a network. Once you've got those taken care of, then its up to you "where" you want to go, (database admin, Linux systems admin, programmer, software development, package maintainer etc.) Hope this helps...

    Cheers!
  20. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

    Messages:
    1,379
    Likes Received:
    1,094
    Trophy Points:
    113
    1. Linux is free

    2. Better security

    3. open-source that you can change to your particular needs

    4. stability

    More info and detailed list on http://www.linux.org/threads/yin-yang-tux.5240/

Share This Page