Two Epic Fails Trying to Install Mint on an Old Acer Aspire 3000 Laptop

Discussion in 'General Linux' started by stevefoobar, Jul 21, 2013.

  1. stevefoobar

    stevefoobar New Member

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    I'm really trying to use Mint Xfce on my old Acer Aspire Laptop because I heard it's a good lightweight, trouble-free version with most (if not all) common drivers and apps included.

    Sadly, I may have to look for another distro after two installation failures.

    The first attempt was Mint 15 ISO burn to DVD. The DVD didn't even load properly upon boot. I got just a blinking cursor in the upper left corner of the screen! Of course, I did a check-sum and burn verification in Nero first and the DVD reads fine on my desktop WinXP PC.

    The second attempt was after learning about a very cool app called UNetbootin http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/. I downloaded and used this app and this time let it download Mint 15 with Cinnamon and I selected the hard drive boot option. Upon reboot, it did start to load Mint it appeared but lines were scrolling too fast for me to see and I thought I saw a line that said something about "not found". It did continue to scroll lines however, but eventually just locked up on a line that reads:


    [ 117.756009] [<c1576ed4>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb

    Does anyone have any ideas or tips or should I just abandon Mint for another distro? Any ideas for another distro that's light enough for an old Acer Aspire 3000 Laptop?

    Hardware
    CPU: AMD Sempron 1.6 GHz
    GPU: SiS M760GX
    HD: 40 GB
    Wireless: Broadcom 802.11g
    Ethernet: SiS 900-Based PCI Fast Ethernet
  2. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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    Okay, personally I think anything Mint is garbage. But, that being said, I think if you want it to work we can help.
  3. stevefoobar

    stevefoobar New Member

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    ryanvade, what "boot" are you referring to? The hardware boot (BIOS), the boot from Unetbootin or something else?
  4. arochester

    arochester Active Member

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    The linking cursor usually means a problem with your video card. You said that your video card was a SiS M760GX. One solution is shown at https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?pid=100720#p100720

    Other answers are probably to be found in Ubuntu Forums. (Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu.) Unfortunately Ubuntu Forums has been hacked and is off-line at the moment.

    I had similar problems with an Intel Video. I came across on distro, Crunchbang Linux, which worked out-of-the-box.
  5. stevefoobar

    stevefoobar New Member

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    Since I'm new to Linux, I don't understand the solution in this link, nor do I want to put in the time to go down that particular rabbit hole. I think I'm going to try another distro. One eventually has to work, since others have gotten Linux to work on this laptop. If not, then I think I'll have no choice but to stay with WinXP since I don't have unlimited time to spend on this, even though it's fun to learn. :(
  6. Codypy1

    Codypy1 Member

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    Personally Mint is just horrible.

    With this being a old laptop. Why don't you grab Lubuntu? It's very lightweight and ideal for older computer use.

    I installed it for a friend using an old old Toshiba laptop that was running windows xp as.
    Since I installed it they've loved it.

    Other distros you could use could be

    Crunchbang(I've never tried it but I hear positive comments about it)
    Xubuntu(IF you want the xfce experience)

    If you wanna try these and have any trouble trying to test or install them you can send me a message and I could help you step by step.
  7. stevefoobar

    stevefoobar New Member

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    Thanks so much. I've heard of these distros so maybe I'll try them and I may take you up on your generous offer! It's sort of ironic to me that I'm an "old" UNIX guy and I'm finding Linux such a PITA to even get installed and booted.
  8. stevefoobar

    stevefoobar New Member

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    GAME CHANGER! I finally figured out that the primary problem (I'm sure I'll find more problems now but at least I can move forward) was that the DVD-ROM drive in this laptop will not read newer DVD+R disks that I've been using to create the Linux installations on! On a whim, I decided to dig out an old external USB DVD-RW drive, put the Linux DVD in this external drive, rebooted, and much to my surprise, it saw and started loading Linux!

    Now I've got to keep testing from here to see which distro and desktop works best (or at all) with the old hardware in this Acer Aspire 3000 laptop.
    Rob likes this.
  9. SLW210

    SLW210 Member

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    Biggest problem will be getting your drivers for the Broadcom wireless.

    There are several tutorials around depending on exact model.
  10. Codypy1

    Codypy1 Member

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    Wonderful! Let us know how it turns out.
  11. Primit1v3

    Primit1v3 Member

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    Try using a usb instead of a DVD, in my experience it works better and is cheaper. Since you're using Windoze to set it up, my suggestion is to try Pendrive Linux to create the usb. http://www.pendrivelinux.com/
    Also, the suggestion of Crunchbang is a good one. With the older hardware try Crunchbang Statler
    Rob likes this.
  12. MikeyD

    MikeyD Active Member

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    I've heard good things about Puppy Linux being very lightweight, I'm not sure how easy it is to install though as I've never used it. No offense to the OP, but if you don't have the time to troubleshoot much I wouldn't recommend CrunchBang as its a great distro, but can require some manual configuration although not as much as Gentoo or Arch.
    Unfortunately a lot of the 'plug and play' out of the box distros aren't quite as lightweight at the custom distros. If Mint doesn't work out I'd recommend a flavor of Ubuntu as some others have mentioned, namely Lubuntu or Xubuntu since most of the overhead will be in the GUI these forks offer very lightweight GUIs compared to GNOME or KDE

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