The "Regulars"

Discussion in 'Member Introductions' started by DevynCJohnson, Jan 8, 2014.

  1. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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    Some of us regular Linux.org users addicts should probably better list/explain our skills so we can better understand each other and have better ideas on who to tag in unanswered questions.


    My profile can be seen here (tl;dr) - https://launchpad.net/~devyncjohnson-d

    For those that do not read long text, I am primarily a programmer that know a variety of languages and I am learning more. My primary language is Python3, and I hope to learn C after I learn Scala which I have just started. I am familiar with numerous Unix systems like Solaris, *BSD, Inferno, ....., etc. I have some experience with Windows during my evil years until I saw the light and switched to GNU/Linux, thus saving my digital soul ;). I have some certifications and I am very well acquainted with the command-line even though I make jokes that I am so lazy that I alias everything to a few letters (alias touc="touch" #Thanks @lobo ). I am very familiar with the kernel, hence the nickname "Kernel King" (thanks @ryanvade ). Once I know C, then I can become the Kernel Emperor. Overall, I know a variety of other computer/Linux topics. Any questions?
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  2. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    I can describe myself with one sentence: lots of theory, but little practical knowledge.
    - I know absolutely nothing what so ever about programming.
    - I know command line basics.
    - I can handle internet connections fairly well, because I have had to learn, but am by no means an expert. I would say very good beginner.
    - I am fairly good at multiple language issues, such as locales, Ibus and SCIM. This is the one area where my practical knowledge is more than my theory.
    - I know a little about Conky. (Which is not difficult, but I'll brag anyway.)
    - I am getting quite familiar with Debian's internal workings.
    - I know the rudiments of Slackware, CentOS and BSD. (There is that theory but no knowledge thing again.)
    - I am the wrong person to ask for an opinion about anything Buntu-related, including Mint.
    - I make a damn good cup of coffee.

    In short; I am not a professional regarding anything computer-related. I have simply learned a little about installing and configuring open source systems through a little reading and a lot of trial and error.
  3. pane-free

    pane-free Active Member

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    OP said, " . . . hence the nickname 'Kernel King' . . ."

    I was once known as "The Rambler King," but that's another story.

    It does, however, lead into the fact that I am more of a mechanic than anything concerning GNU/Linux or any OS I have ever used. I just want it (the OS) to work and to run well and am most often able to make it do so. A few scripts here and there, once in a while in PERL, is all I am able to manage. Programming is not on my list of likes and I do it out of necessity only.

    Five years as a GIS Tech burnt me out thoroughly on Windows and its damned registry. Sun workstations got me into UNIX briefly around 2000 while using ERDAS. After a 4-yr hiatus, I went back to PCs in 2009 and resolved not to use a Windows OS again. Solaris had died, so it was GNU/Linux by default.

    At present, EFI has me stumped and appears to be more of an impediment to user freedom than a benefit, to me. I do not want a 2TB hard drive and cannot afford even a 1TB SSD -- so WTF do I want EFI, let alone UEFI? (Sorry, off-topic).

    If I can help, I'll try.
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  4. grim76

    grim76 Active Member Staff Writer

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    I have worked my way up through the ranks. Started off as a bench tech putting together simple systems for customers. Then graduated to server tech. Then from there got my first real IT job as a night operator for the company I was with. I would shutdown the systems every night and run batch jobs to close out and bill that days business. (Windows, Netware, and AIX)

    Then from there I went to helpdesk at another company. Quickly worked my way up to hybrid desktop monkey and server jockey. Maintained several remote sites in different parts of the country. I got a taste for Linux when I met a friend at this company. Her husband worked with Unix and he and were able to talk at length about it. He gave me my first linux CDs. (Windows with some AIX and AS/400)

    There was a small mom and pop company job in here that I would just rather forget than talk about. However, it was a learning experience as to what to look for in a company and what not to look for. I setup my first real Linux server here. It was an FTP server that they could upload and download blueprints from.

    Moved from there to a server and SAN administrator. This was for a multisite company that their growth was based on acquisition vs. organic growth. Sites all over the country and world at that point. Traveled to India and Belgium for this company helping setup and work with remote infrastructure. This company was where I got a taste for Unix. We had an antiquated application that ran on 4 SUN machines and I was put in charge of keeping it up. I managed to keep the servers and applications running. This is where I also cut my teeth on vmware and virtualization.

    I moved into a full time Linux admin role from there. Working with all kinds of Dell hardware and vmware. This was my first real taste of Linux full time with no windows work. Working with OEL (Oracle Enterprise Linux), Red Hat, and SuSE. There was some Solaris work in there as well, but not much since we had dedicated staff for that. All in all I was responsible for about 80 servers and about another 25-30 vms. Plus managed most of the vmware environment.

    Where I am at today I am primarily responsible for our SAN, Linux, and some of our vmware environments. Also partially responsible for some work that is being done in a couple IaaS providers. Working with mainly Debian, Ubuntu, and SuSE. Responsible for about 250 servers with one helper.

    Personally I have worked on a ton of different hardware and infrastructure. Infiniband, Xsigo, iSCSI, Fiber Channel, HP standalone, Dell standalone, HP blades, Dell Blades, Sun hardware and tons of other hardware. Various SAN hardware - Solifire, Nimble, Whiptail, VNX, VNXe, and basic knowledge of Hitatchi storage.

    Linux distros that I have worked with: Red Hat, OEL, SuSE, Ubuntu, Mandrake, Gentoo, and Debian.
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  5. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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  6. grim76

    grim76 Active Member Staff Writer

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    Solaris is far from dead. There are still places I know of that run on Solaris only. They have almost nothing on the Windows server side.
  7. pane-free

    pane-free Active Member

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    OK, it was in limbo in 2009! Cheez -- engineers! LOL
  8. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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    Yeah, I noticed that. I thought you were some member of the past that would never return, but then recently, I saw new posts from you. Why were you away for so long?

    Welcome back ghostly user.
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  9. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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    https://www.ultimateeditionoz.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=5278#p41575

    To go along with that...

    I am a moderator HERE, at the Ultimate Edition Oz forum, and Ultimate Edition forum. I helped to start the Syntax Ciphers group at SIUE (not yet official, 13 members and growing. We just setup a website and forum!!!). I prefer to work with exotic kernels and development software. I primarily use Arch Linux but also mess around with Ultimate Edition and Oz Unity. The terminal is the land for me. Working with development drivers and modules is also fun. Bumblebee and Beats Audio support are some of my on-going projects.

    I am going to be staring some youtube series so here is a link to my channel:
    https://www.youtube.com/user/ryanvade?feature=watch
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  10. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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    It helps this site a lot that you are familiar with Nvidia and Bumblebee. Without you, this site would be in trouble.;)
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  11. unixfish

    unixfish Member

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    I have been doing "this UNIX stuff" for years. I started with VMS back in the mid 80's. My UNIX adventure started with AIX back in 1992 or so. I have worked on AIX, HP-UX, Digital UNIX, Solaris, Sun-OS, Interactive UNIX, Linux, and a few other odd balls. I grew up on the command line.

    I am more of a systems person, but I program as well. I have used Pascal, Fortran, basic, C, assembler on a few different systems, VB, C#, Perl, and a number of scripting languages / shells. I am a bit old school - I don't like Object Oriented coding. Give me a command line and Emacs and I'm happy.

    I do systems / interface code as well as application code. A lot of my work interfaces into packages, like OpenView, BPPM, Oracle / MySQL / general databases, web, etc. I end up dabbling in networking as part of my job as well.

    I currently use Ubuntu for my home machine - not perfect, but good enough with enough support to work for me.

    I've always said you are not a real Sys Admin until you have crashed a machine by accident. So yes - I have been a real SysAdmin!

    As you can see, my background is a chunk of lots of areas of IT. This makes system and interface work easier.
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