Slackware DEAD?!

Discussion in 'General Linux' started by Kryyll, Mar 5, 2014.

  1. Kryyll

    Kryyll Active Member

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    I've heard a lot of things about how Slackware is dead. Also, my friend that uses Arch says that Slackware is dead and I should move to a "more new-age" distro. I disagree because Slackware has never treated me bad and I have NEVER had a single problem getting anything running on Slack. However, it does suck that it doesn't really get updated as much as other distros.

    Anywho, what are your opinions on this topic?! :)

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  2. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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    Best Answer
    As many users have already stated, Slackware is far from dead. Slackware is as dead as a slow-growing strong oak tree.
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  3. Yesyesloud

    Yesyesloud Active Member

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    ARCH is a bleeding-edge, rolling distro, its main contra consists in the fact that constant updates can easily "break" the system. If you know enough, however, you quickly recover your setup.

    I use and love it, but I'd never say "ARCH is better than Slack", let alone "Slackware is dead". It's plain childish to state so.

    The kernel is upgraded quite frequently on a rolling OS, for instance. This model seems to be the main prototype for the future of operating systems. You get that feeling that you're always on the edge of technology, which is also elusive. ARCH fora hugely increase in help requests after system upgrades are available, which don't often come with enhancements for everybody's computers.

    Slackware releases, on the other hand, are only available when the system has proven rock-solid stability. Not everyone needs the latest updates in order to keep up with their long-established routines.

    I tend to think that one only needs an updated system if any piece of software or hardware is not behaving or performing as desired.
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
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  4. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    Your friend is obviously referring to Slackware's slow release cycle ("old" system). It is dead, because it is "old". At least that is the obvious meaning to me. If I am wrong, please correct me. If I am correct, your friend is an idiot. I would be willing to bet he is one of those fools who uses Arch simply because he wants the latest software and not the "ancient" software available with systems like Debian and CentOS. In other words, the kind of person who should not be using Arch.
  5. labrat

    labrat Active Member

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    As a Slackware user I can tell you that you've been mislead by fanboi rhetoric... Slackware is going from strength to strength and is far from dead.

    Slackware releases roughly once per year to no set deadlines and is pretty much upstream software with no real patching from the distro maintainer. The software in a Slackware release is more up to date than, say a comparable Debian release, but obviously not as up to date as say a comparable fedora release.

    It's not just about the latest software however. Slackware is a pretty conservative distro on the whole and has it's own BSD style init scripts but still based on the durable and proven sysvinit. Not just any old rubbish can make it into Slackware.

    Slackware aims to be a UNIX (Linux was classically described as a free UNIX implementation) whereas some other distros, desktops and init systems are striving to create a more windows like experience. I don't know what you want, but personally I don't run GNU/Linux for a windows like experience, to have my hand held and to have configuration and the "guts" of the OS hidden away from me. I want plain text config, KISS principles, the lot, or nothing. If I wanted windows, I'd run windows...

    So unless you're really missing gnome, then there is no real reason to switch from Slackware.
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  6. pane-free

    pane-free Active Member

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    @labrat
    "Not just any old rubbish can make it into Slackware." +1

    If I want bleeding edge, I just download the latest sid-based Debian distro and install. Usually crash it within a couple months, but it was/is always fun. That's what it's about, IMHO.

    BTW, just installed the latest Salix64-xfce-14.1 and it's a joy to use "Slackware for the lazy Slacker!" (Haven't found any Arch any fun at all, on the other hand. Maybe it's just me. lol!). Installed the Base system and am now choosing my apps.

    Between it and MX-14 beta2, I cannot say which one I am enjoying the most! XFCE sure is pretty with MX-14 and my Quadro FX 3400 -- 32-bit neverlooked so good
  7. Kryyll

    Kryyll Active Member

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    In my opinion, Slackware is the best. Whenever my friend has an issue with his system it usually takes him a day(no working on it all day but working on it here and there) to fix the problem. Most of the issues I've never had on Slackware because it's so stable and comes with everything you need right out of the box.

    I'm glad to see that you guys agree with me on this topic! Thanks for your replies! ^_^
  8. Kryyll

    Kryyll Active Member

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    And by the way, I think that Arch is a really good distro too. I'm not hating on it ;)
  9. labrat

    labrat Active Member

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    Cyber-Berserker is also correct in that there is an element of quite vocal Arch users (mostly found on the Arch forums) who use it because it contains the newest software and in doing so deceive themselves that installing and using Arch makes them some kind of more "advanced" user or at least a superior user to another Linux user running a more typical distro. You get something similar among some Debian testing/unstable users, but not to the same extent. Most of these types of fanbois are ex 'buntu users.

    I would give a wild guess that the vast majority of users running testing/development/rolling/bleeding edge branches of distributions are not contributing by reporting bugs. I would also guess that a good proportion of those are doing so because of hardware support, because they lack the ability to install/build a newer kernel.
  10. MikeyD

    MikeyD Active Member

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    Slackware still has an active development so I don't know how any "knowledgeable" Linux user could call it "dead." By that logic I guess CentOS is dead too, because it has a similarly slow release cycle?

    I'm an Arch user, but I use it for the minimalism and the anal-retentive ability to see and choose everything that goes onto the HDD. I don't care as much about having bleeding-edge releases, but I do update my system bi-weekly and I've only had one problem with an update in the 2-3 years this machine has exclusively run Arch. I think most of the upgrade issues people have arise from not updating their systems frequently. Trying to update 2 months worth of releases at once will no doubt cause more problems.

    All my work-related stuff and servers run CentOS though because it is much more stable. It just comes down to what you want/need from a specific OS.

    There is no "best" distro, and at a certain level no popular distros are universally "better" than any others. The fact that your friend doesn't realize that makes me wonder why hes even using Linux let alone Arch (and giving Arch users a bad name).
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  11. Yesyesloud

    Yesyesloud Active Member

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    LOL! I'm definitely adopting that Freudian metaphor to joke about the average computer knowledgeable pal. If ARCH community were a little less proud, they could elect anal-retentive abilities for their slogan hah. I hold no grudges over laughing at myself :D

    I used to have upgrade problems before adhering to FOSS drivers (they haven't worked so well for my system until recently). Proprietary drivers could break down even with proper hook services installed, since they're kernel version dependent usually; with emphasis on video, which can be a problem if you wanna surf the web on the CLI (not really hehe), but reinstalling them is quick and easy for those who know their thing off the top of the head.

    Yes... No matter how proprietary-stuffed some distributions have become, both their closed and open source enhancements/benefits can extend to the whole GNU/Linux community, which would be stronger without so many internal distribution-based superiority complexes and brawls. The big enemy is not the other distro, definitely.
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  12. MikeyD

    MikeyD Active Member

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    Ha that is true people on the Arch Linux forums are some of the most knowledgeable people I've see in forums, but can be incredibly harsh / impatient / proud. I lurk there to learn, but much prefer Linux.org ;) *brown nose*
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  13. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    You sound like a "real" Arch user.:cool:
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  14. Yesyesloud

    Yesyesloud Active Member

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    da troo user nawt only master it, thou haz to follow DA CODE!!11
  15. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    Does The Code include dualing with command lines at ten paces?:p
  16. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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    Best Answer
    As many users have already stated, Slackware is far from dead. Slackware is as dead as a slow-growing strong oak tree.
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  17. Kryyll

    Kryyll Active Member

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    Very very well said.
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