Reinstallation problem

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by eschamp, Aug 13, 2012.

  1. eschamp

    eschamp New Member

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    I installed Linux Mint 13 on my laptop which previously had Windows 7 on it, to get a dual boot machine.

    I did not like the appearance of the standard boot loader so installed GAG v4.10, I believe. Didn't like that either so I uninstalled it.

    That left me with the Windows boot manager that did not recognize Linux in the other partition. So I wiped out that partition and extended the Windows partition to its original size.

    Then I tried to reinstall Linux Mint. The very first installation gave me a choice of installing Mint in its own partition and that's what I had done. However, now it offers to either replace Windows or do "something else". In other words, the third choice -- coexistence between Linux and Windows -- is gone. On selecting "do something else", it was not apparent how to split the existing partition into Windows and Linux.

    Can anyone help me do that?


    Thanks.
  2. pane-free

    pane-free Active Member

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    OP said, "That left me with the Windows boot manager that did not recognize Linux in the other partition. * So I wiped out that partition and extended the Windows partition to its original size. **"

    * at this point, EasyBCD could have been installed, which will recognize a Linux partition

    ** okay, assuming Win7 was used to do this and the formerly-sized partition was formatted using ext4, Linux will recognize the now shrunken partition . . .

    Thus, the "something else" choice on re-install.

    OP further said, "In other words, the third choice -- coexistence between Linux and Windows -- is gone. On selecting "do something else", it was not apparent how to split the existing partition into Windows and Linux."

    Wrong assumption -- one just has to do it differently, now.

    Easiest way is to use a utility LiveCD such as System Rescue CD (I use 2.0.0 or earlier) after re-shrinking Win7 partition using Win7. On booting the SysRescCD, hit 'default' four or five times, ending up at a multi-colored prompt on a page asking user to type either 'wizard" or "startx" -- do the latter. Up pops a yellow-colored terminal where user types in "gparted." Create a Primary partition of about 18GB for / and an Extended partition of the remainder of the hdd (assuming Win7 is on no more than two partitions and total on hdd will be four), where two Logical partitions may be created for swap and /home, 2GB and remainder of Extended partition, respectively.

    Make a note of how partitons are recognized (e.g. /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda5 and/or /dev/sda6). Then format / and /home to ext4 (optionally format swap) and exit gparted and System Rescue CD.

    Install distro of choice, using "something other" or "manual" and properly editing the partitions (e.g. /dev/sda3 for / and formatted to ext4) to be used for the install.
  3. eschamp

    eschamp New Member

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    Thanks but that's way more complicated than I would like.
  4. animaguy

    animaguy New Member

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    I use Linux Mint 13 too and because I have been testing a lot I reinstall all the time.

    When I reinstall I usually do one of two things by default.

    I boot a live cd with Linux Mint and use Gparted to delete all partitions currently on the harddrive. Gparted is a partition managing software that can be found in Applications > System.

    Another method is a small program called "parted".

    I dont think "parted" is installed by default in LM 13. But you can install with:

    sudo apt-get install parted

    If you google "parted" you should be able to get more info.
  5. eschamp

    eschamp New Member

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    Thanks. I don't want to delete all the partitions.
  6. eschamp

    eschamp New Member

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    I was more comfortable restoring a 2-day-old Windows system image.

    Thanks for your suggestions.
  7. pane-free

    pane-free Active Member

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    "Thanks but that's way more complicated than I would like."
    Easy once you've done it a couple times!

    "Why would I want to install a 3rd party boot loader at this point?"
    Because it's easy!

    Must develop a thick skin, especially when you screw things up then ask for help!
  8. eschamp

    eschamp New Member

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    I don't expect to do this more than once per computer. :)

    You missed my point. I have the "native" boot loader. Why would I want a third party boot loader?

    How is uninstalling GAG -- using their instructions -- to be construed as MY screwing up?
  9. animaguy

    animaguy New Member

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    If you use parted:

    sudo-apt install parted
    (to install)

    sudo parted
    (to run parted once installed)

    print
    (when parted is running this command will list all partitions on harddrive. each partition is given an id number starting with the number 1)

    rm 1
    (when parted is running this command will only erase partition ID# 1)

    rm 2
    (when patted is running this command will only erase partition ID# 2)

    print
    (list partitions that still exist)

    quit
    (exit program)

    reboot computer for changes to properly take place.

    DISCLAIMER
    I am unaware of partition recovery for any mistakes made, so use "parted with caution.
    eschamp likes this.

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