Okay so I' am Ubunto "schooled" and want to delve deeper into all things Linux...

Discussion in 'Ubuntu' started by dbceee, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. dbceee

    dbceee New Member

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    So, oh sage travellers of the Linux road, please give me some next steps on my journey, please, for which I will express deserved appreciation (promise!) -- dbceee

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  2. dbceee

    dbceee New Member

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    My apologies on the double post, I won't blame it on Ubuntu! :eek:
  3. arochester

    arochester Well-Known Member

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    What are you looking for? More Ubuntu? Something else? http://askubuntu.com/questions/51566/what-is-the-best-place-for-learning-how-to-use-ubuntu

    There is an idea: Use Ubuntu and learn Ubuntu, use (e.g.) Slackware and learn Linux...

    If you are looking for something else then the basic specs of you computer might be useful. You need to decide if you are staying with .deb type distros - so what you have learned from Ubuntu might be relevant- or .rpm (Redhat Package Management) type distros, or more specialised distros e.g. Arch, Gentoo, Slackware...
  4. Videodrome

    Videodrome Active Member

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    If the OP wants to try other Distros, I'd suggest Debian or other Debian based Distros. It makes sense to me because Ubuntu is built on Debian so it would keep things simple to stick with the Debian distro family.

    Also, I think plain Debian would be more minimal. Someone wanting to learn could try adding different things to it such as the Wifi drivers, Flashplayer, or even different Desktop Environments. Also, because Ubuntu is built on Debian, the command line shouldn't be radically different.

    Another distro the OP might find interesting is MEPIS Linux which is also built on Debian and includes the KDE desktop. Command Line should be familiar but with a different desktop experience.

    Linux Mint is worth a look to and might offer an Ubuntu user more interesting desktops. I think the Linux Mint with Xfce desktop is nice for low power systems.

    For a beginner, I would suggest avoiding things based on Slackware or RedHat. I think it will just get you really confused with the different command line. Also, avoid FreeBSD or other BSDs which are actually Unix and not Linux. I will also suggest avoiding Arch Linux or even Manjaro. Manjaro isn't to difficult, but it does not have the familiar Debian command line. I think an Ubuntu beginner would want to Apt-Get Install and not know about the Pacman -S thing.
  5. dbceee

    dbceee New Member

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    arochester, thanks for your reply!

    Sorry, I will be clearer, Linux is my next "path", but I could be influenced otherwise...

    I have a Gigabyte GA-M68MT-S2P MB with a AMD Phenom(tm) II X3 720 Processor × 3 and 8G RAM
    Sentey BCP450-OC PS
    64-bit OS
    2T HD x 2 in RAID I or "mirrored"
    oh and a couple extra fans on my Sentey case

    The system is used for my work (I do a lot of video conferencing, writing (I use dictation software for most of it)) and for some light gaming and for amateur video/audio editing and for me to hack around on.

    My next computer will be a refubished 2013 iMac 27" screen for the business... Then I'll get something bigger and better than what I just quoted above for gaming and learning Linux...
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2013
  6. dbceee

    dbceee New Member

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    videodrome, thanks for your reply, I wouldn't consider myself an Ubuntu beginner (was I too metaphorical or obtuse in what I opened with?). Rather I'd say I can get around in Ubuntu quite well. I don't write code or my own programs for Ubuntu, but I am quite proficient with the GUI and know how to get things done and get around somethings, too.

    So thanks for the Linux Mint idea, I have interestingly enough been suggested that before by a geeky bud of mine whom I highly respect in all things computer (esp. non-PC/Apple). Would you suggest the Cinnamon or Mate desktop?

    You get "Best Reply" so far... Let's see what else is shared!
    DevynCJohnson likes this.
  7. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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    To become a Linux master, you should learn the following (or at least try them and get a basic understanding) -

    1. Learn shell scripting (Unix shell such as Bash)
    2. Try all (or most) of the different desktop interfaces - (XFCE, LXDE, GNOME, Unity, RatPoison, Mate, etc.)
    3. Try various distros (at least one Debian-based, RedHat-based, Slackware-based, and one Puppy Linux)
    4. Understand the Linux kernel (http://www.linux.org/threads/the-linux-kernel-introduction.4203/)
    5. Love Linux with all your RAM, storage, and CPU.
    6. Thou shalt remove all traces of the Blue Empire (Microsuck)
    7. Thou shalt have no other operating systems before Linux.

    To become a Lord of Linux, complete all seven steps and learn all of the information needed to earn your Linux+ certification. The exam is one that can only be beaten by mighty Linux users. This monster will try to beat you. To get past the troll to enter the testing site, you must show valid identification and give $178USD as tribute to face the beast. If the beast kills you, thou shalt recover for a week before the beast will allow you in its presence.
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  8. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    The following is not a criticism of the person who posted it or even a reference to him. I am posting this for general reference for those who may read this thread and benefit from it.

    The term beginner is not a reference to the amount of time a person has used Linux, but rather to the amount of knowledge possessed by the person. A person can use a system for twenty years, point-and-clicking to bliss, and still be a beginner. There are people who have used Linux half as long as I have who would consider me a beginner. Knowing how to use GUI dialogue boxes will not prepare one for a "deeper excursion" with other distributions. Learning basic shell commands and learning about the Linux file system are easy things to learn that will build a good foundation to progress from.

    As for the OP, my opinion is at variance with some of the others. If you want to experience other systems, I suggest staying away from Mint and other Buntu derivatives, at least for the time being. Little exploring will be done with systems so similar to the one you are used to. Devyn's advice is good. Try systems from the Debian, Slackware and Red Hat lineages. (Also Arch and Gentoo if desired, after attaining sufficient knowledge.) There is little difference between package managers, but you may find you have a preference for one. There is also a difference in the amount of "bloat" between systems. Although that can usually be eliminated by installing a base system and adding what you want. You will also discover a difference in philosophy towards free software, dedication to providing a usable system, and attitude toward users. Checking out many systems will give you an idea of which ones are better suited to both your needs and preferences.
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  9. lobo

    lobo Active Member

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    It seems like the next logical step should be Debian - but it's up to you of course. You can learn more using any distro, but Debian forces you to delve deeper as you have to set up more things for yourself. It's also the distro on which ubuntu is based, so not a huge change.

    Some distributions - which will not be named to avoid flame wars - have taken to hiding the CLI in order to present the user with a seamless graphical appearance from boot up until the desktop is loaded. This is the kind of thing which can often get in the way of learning the basics.

    The advantage of Debian is that after familiarising yourself with the system you can progress by upgrading to the testing or unstable branches and learning to build from source.

    Slackware (my distro of choice) is another good option if you just want to jump right in.

    Lastly, unshackling yourself from windows is quite important. I found that progress was slow with windows always hanging around - I haven't run windows at home now for about 5 years and have not missed it.
    DevynCJohnson likes this.
  10. arochester

    arochester Well-Known Member

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  11. dbceee

    dbceee New Member

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    Many thanks, Devyn, I will muse upon your learned prose as I peck away at my keyboard, for I have posted such nearby... Love the "7 Linux Commandments"! :eek:P
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  12. dbceee

    dbceee New Member

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    I am trying Linux Mint out today... Stay tuned!
  13. aprylraye

    aprylraye New Member

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    Try Fedora or Linux Mint
  14. pane-free

    pane-free Active Member

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    Hell, if you really want to learn linux, first try Slackware or like-derived distros such as Salix ( a variety of DEs/WMs are available, even ratpoison) which uses slapt-get package manager, derived from Debian-based apt-get pkg mgr. Salix "eases the pain" of learning Slackware, which could be the next step in the process, as a suggestion.
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  15. vizier

    vizier New Member

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    Seeing as how you are comfortable in Ubuntu, you could try Mint as mentioned above. I loved Mint. But found I wasn't really learning much. I toyed with lots of Ubuntu derivatives. I really like both Lubuntu and Xubuntu, despite not being too crazy about Unity though. But on all Ubuntus, I had scads of problems with power management and incessant crash notifications. Also, found that what i really wanted was an escape from the way MSW and Apple had fashioned my thinking (Ubuntu is easy because the system is mostly familiar to users of MSW and Mac), and a unique, reliabel, stable computing experience.

    I distrohopped quite a bit until I found #! (crunchbang.org). #! is just Debian with some fancy setup scripts. Because it is Debian, it has the excellent apt-get terminal package management tools (so flexible and awesome imho), but the set up scripts basically do all the work in configuring your system. You could try plain old Debian, but, it is a lot of configuring and tweaking. A lot.

    I jumped from Lubuntu to #! because I liked Openbox so much. i love the Openbox menu because it is very scriptable and customizable. I have also learned a lot about how the nuts and bolts of the system worked because the community at #! forums is so helpful & friendly. #! has a learning curve (customizing your panel (tint2) and Openbox and Conky are easy but there are no GUIs for it) and you'll have to ask questions and participate in the forums, but that's part of the fun.

    I found my CPU usage dropped from 25-30% with 6-7 apps open in Ubuntu down to 12% with the same apps open in Lubuntu. But on #! it is usually 4-6%. Never ever any crashes.

    If you want to stray from Debian, you could try Manjaro, which is preconfigured (easier) Arch (lots of work to do). Or go the opposite direction and get OpenSuse (which is really slick and the best on battery life).
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  16. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    Bovine excrement.
    Although almost any configuration beyond the "normal" range requires a little work, a default installation will work perfectly well for most people (Wireless internet being a notable exception.) And most things are easy to do. Doing them just requires peeking at the documentation.
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  17. dbceee

    dbceee New Member

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    Well I'm trying Mint today actually (been kinda busy lately...). Just having fun getting a iso burn for the install! :eek:S

    Stay tuned, I'll u/d you (if you like) on my adventures...

    Special thanks to visier for your likeable post! devyn and you are tied to the best post so far!
  18. MikeyD

    MikeyD Active Member

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    Truthfully, i think the distro you chose will have very little to do with your Linux development. One of the best things you can do to become more Linux proficient is force yourself to use the command-line. Regardless of how flashy desktops get, the nuts and bolts of your system are more readily available from the command-line and that knowledge is easily adapted to most other GNU/Linux distros (albeit with some syntax differences in a few cases).

    This is a pretty good tutorial that goes through basic navigation up to and including shell scripting: http://linuxcommand.org/learning_the_shell.php
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  19. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    Careful. Many people will accuse you of being a Linux elitist.:cool:
  20. pane-free

    pane-free Active Member

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    Such people most probably grew up with Windows and never even looked at DOS or used the
    Code:
    cmd
    command. IMHO, having to tweak the registry was far less desirable and takes more time than simply using a command line. I will not condone being told my education/experience makes me elitist (aka snobbish). I worked hard for it and lazy people should stick with the dominant OS or something like Zorin or Ubuntu and not criticize simply because they choose to remain dummied-down, complacent consumers.

    Pane-Free = No Windows, no EULA, optional conformity to the so-called norm
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