Need to kill install or it kills me

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by URDRWHO, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. URDRWHO

    URDRWHO Member

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    I started a driver update (WiFi and Nvidia) it froze the computer.

    So I re-started and apparently I have (X) amount of time to do some things before it freezes. Apparently the update is still happening in the back round.


    I don't have a lot of time to do a bunch of terminal typing. Is there something that kills all apps running in a quick efficient manner?

    The computer has been sitting frozen for 5 minutes, fans humming fast.
    DevynCJohnson likes this.
  2. ZZs

    ZZs Active Member

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    quick way:
    Go into terminal run top, type top enter.
    Look at the process in question and get its PID# from the table
    Type "kPID#" ie k1035
    q to exit top
  3. MikeyD

    MikeyD Active Member

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    You may be able to find boot commands to boot with minimal processes or boot straight to terminal if its an Nvidia problem. Boot commands vary by distro but are easy to find around the web.
  4. URDRWHO

    URDRWHO Member

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    Sigh! I'm done. Time to uninstall.

    I'm starting to wonder where the greatness is in Linux? Windoz Ctrl Alt Deltet --- see the task you want to end.....end it game over.

    I was watching what was running, guessed at apt-get (or something like it). Started to type terminal and it froze.

    Linux...command --- watch as it searches, go to command enter a bunch of numbers...etc. If I had this stuff on my employees computers it would waste a lot of labor capital.

    I'm going to give another distro a try. Maybe????
  5. ZZs

    ZZs Active Member

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    Try Debian its SOLID. You can download it pre-configured with the LXDE desktop to save resources like you tried to do with the Lubuntu. Make sure you pull the ISO that uses the Stable version and the correct bit architecture. (prolly 32bit)
    DevynCJohnson likes this.
  6. arochester

    arochester Well-Known Member

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  7. URDRWHO

    URDRWHO Member

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  8. URDRWHO

    URDRWHO Member

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    I did everything needed to remove Ubuntu and I'm in the process of trying Mint. If Mint doesn't work I also have Suse and maybe Knoppix to try.
  9. Darren Hale

    Darren Hale Active Member

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    My advice would be to use live cd's and do the updates and see if the freezing happens again. Puppy Linux Precise would be a good testing distro or Slacko version. There is also a Debian Wheezy version.
    DevynCJohnson likes this.
  10. URDRWHO

    URDRWHO Member

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    I tried the Knoppix 7 Live CD and it found every freak'in thing. It even found my WiFi, the light on my laptop was illuminated. Wish it was an OS that could be installed, I was impressed.

    The Mint installed, seemed fine, I rebooted but it froze on reboot.

    I started to install Suse but stopped when I got to a much different partition choice. I already had one partition problem a week ago....I don't need another one.

    Lubuntu has an odd graphics problem but maybe that could be solved with updated drivers but I doubt it.

    If I get a distro I like, I"ll need to figure out how to stop the annoying system noises. When I am up late into the night, I don't want some jungle sounds popping up when the system starts.
  11. Videodrome

    Videodrome Active Member

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    Seriously, I like Crunchbang a lot for hardware support and the OpenBox style desktop helps make it low on resources. Crunchbang is also built on Debian stable.
    I would recommend at least trying it live. If you get used to the OpenBox style desktop, I think it's great. It recognizes my Netbook Broadcom wifi easily.
  12. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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  13. URDRWHO

    URDRWHO Member

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  14. Darren Hale

    Darren Hale Active Member

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    Ryanvade a great video for helping a newbie thank you for the work going into this.
  15. URDRWHO

    URDRWHO Member

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    Darn it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I went through a lot of crap and now I have Ubuntu installed again. Went to install drivers and Nvidia went well. It tried to install the Broadcom driver and just like last time --- it starts and then freezes. It is stuck in get-app trying to install that piece of crap Broadcom driver.

    After all these years I thought that Linux would be further ahead than just some toy to play with but it sure isn't ready for prime time....not one bit!

    Not having a user interface for a lot of commands is why Linux will never be used by the public. Trying to use Top and then Pkill --- typing fast before the crash is crazy!

    Seriously --- looking back and forth at my desktop trying to type such stuff as this ---- Come on! "
    cat /var/log/syslog | grep -e wlan -e b43 | tail -n25"

    Or this --
    sudo dpkg -i --force-all /var/cache/apt/archives/kdebase-runtime-data_4%3a4.4.5-0ubuntu1_all.deb
    sudo apt-get -f install
    sudo apt-get autoremove
    Sorry for ranting, it is late and frustration is high. :)
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014
  16. ZZs

    ZZs Active Member

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    Make sure you are loading the correct driver for your model. Only time I had issues with installing mine is when I used the wrong one. Ubuntu has great support on this as well.
  17. Darren Hale

    Darren Hale Active Member

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  18. ZZs

    ZZs Active Member

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  19. Mitt Green

    Mitt Green Member

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    "Nvidia, f*c& you" (c). You know, who said it.

    **Edited by @ryanvade
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 27, 2014
  20. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    Your frustration is understandable, but as I see things, there are two problems:
    Misunderstanding
    You are blaming the wrong people. Lack of support for a few drivers is not the fault of Linux systems. It is the fault of a small number of companies that refuse to include open source software for their hardware. If the large oil companies were to refuse to supply small towns with petrol, resulting in a shortage of fuel for the town's cars, the fault would not lie with the companies that make the vehicles.

    User error
    Distributions like Ubuntu and Mint provide all the drivers they can, including proprietary crapware. So unless you have really exotic hardware, you must be doing something wrong. It would be helpful if you provided details of:
    1) Which drivers you are trying to install, including where you are getting them from: the distro's package repository or an outside source.
    2) How you are trying to install them. (Exact details. They will help others narrow down the possible problem.)

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