Mount drive

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by William Shakespare, Aug 9, 2012.

  1. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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    I have a virtual machine running on Kubuntu (Oneiric Ocelot) that I access via a Windows based pc using remote desktop connection. I need to read and write on network drives that are on a Windows server for which I have permissions. I tried to set this up via Dolphin but it did not work, I'm thinkng because I didn't see a way to issue credentials (it only prompts for name, server and folder when you try to add a network drive). It's not clear to me how to specify the path to my folders on the network. If I look at Windows explorer I see:

    Computer>BB001(E:)>Docs>Reports

    However, my IS folks said the path is:

    \ARX\ARX1\Res\BB001

    I have an ip address for the windows server as well which I also tried.

    How does one determine the proper name, sever, and folder to add a network drive in Dolphin? Would it be better just to do this at the Konsole? How?

    I want to mount Computer>BB001(E:)>Docs>Reports on my VM. Looks like from what I've read I have to create a mount point first.

    sudo mkdir -p /mnt/sharename

    That's telling the VM to create a temporary subdirectory under mnt called sharename, right?

    Then I have to mount the drive.


    sudo mount [IP AND/OR FOLDER ON THE WINDOWS SERVER] /mnt/sharename -o \
    username=username,password=password,dmask=777,fmask=777

    Is this strcuture correct? How do I determine what to specify what's in brackets?

    Anyway, I looked around nin the forums here and other places on the web but didn't come up with an answer.
  2. ehansen

    ehansen New Member Staff Writer

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    Long story short, you need to install Samba on your Linux machine before you can mount Windows shares. I haven't done a Windows->Linux share in a while (mostly do Linux->Windows) so I'm not sure what the command is exactly.

    No, if you did "mkdir -p /tmp/sharename" then it would be a temporary subdirectory. Making a directory in /mnt is a permanent folder unless you delete it.
  3. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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  4. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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  5. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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  6. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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  7. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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    a link relevant to a question.
  8. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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  9. William Shakespare

    William Shakespare New Member

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    If I type smbtree I can see my shares but how do I know which one contains the folder I want to access?
  10. Kerms

    Kerms New Member

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    Being massively undereducated in Windows/Windows sysadmin'ing I only can guide you in what it means
    So,

    Code:
    mount -t smbfs -o username=<username>,password=<password> //<win-box>/<share> /mnt/<name-of-mountpoint>
    `<win-box>' means the IP/domain the Windows box is bound to.
    For `<share>', my best guess is the sharename of the folder/file/etc that was put up as a shared thing. If that doesn't work, do the full path in the form of `/a/b/c/d' (I guess cut off the C: at the beginning).
    (The ip can be found out via `ipconfig' on the windows box.)

    To make things a bit easier for yourself you can attach a domain to an IP by appending /etc/hosts on the linux box/vm with
    `<IP> <WantedHostName>'.

    Lastly (but almost unimportant), `/mnt' is usually the temporary mount directory and only used once in a blue moon. If you're going to want the windows shared mounted for most of the uptime of the linux box, create a dedicated directory in `/' and edit `/etc/fstab' to automount it during boot.

    (Append fstab with: )

    Code:
    //servername/sharename /mountdirectory smbfs username=windowsuserename,password=windowspassword 0 0
    Edit: Since /etc/fstab can be read by anyone, in your home directory,

    echo username=mywindowsusername > .smbpasswd
    echo password=mywindowspassword >> .smbpasswd
    chmod 600 .smbpasswd

    Then add this to fstab:
    smbmount //servername/sharename /mountdirectory -o credentials=/home/myhomedirectory/.smbpasswd 0 0

    Sources:
    http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Filesystems/Mounting_smbfs_Shares_Permanently.html

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