LINUX Installation

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by CJ_7538, Nov 22, 2013.

  1. CJ_7538

    CJ_7538 New Member

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    So, I am essentially brand new to LINUX, but my father uses it extensively. I have a laptop that I want to put LINUX on. It currently has NO operating system on it, just a brand new formatted hard drive. A). Any suggestions as to a easy to use desktop version would be great (I'm thinking UBUNTU) and B). Will it install the drivers necessary to operate everything on the system, i.e., the wireless card so I can get on the internet right away, the DVD drive, etc? If not, how do I get those drivers? Thanks, in advance for the help!

    ~ CJ


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  2. arochester

    arochester Active Member

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  3. Videodrome

    Videodrome Active Member

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    I think MEPIS Linux is decent. It's built on top of Debian, but they do give you the drivers. It seems to work well out of the box including Flash for YouTube and Wireless support. It comes with the KDE Desktop environment.

    Ubuntu and Mint are other popular suggestions and also definitely worth a look.


    Avoid plain Debian. You don't get squat for drivers or even Flash.
  4. alug_Doc

    alug_Doc Member

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    For beginners we don't usually recommend Ubuntu. It's just not complete enough out-of-the-box.

    Linux Mint 13 or PCLinuxOS are better choices for first-time users.

    There is a new distro that I've tested as a Live DVD that is quite impressive: Centrych.

    The first step is to download a variety of Linux operating systems and test them by booting directly off of the disc (or flash drive) to see how the OS will work with your hardware. Find the distro that feels right for you. Linux is not one-size-fits-all software. You have choices. Explore!
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  5. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    With few exceptions, the only things not included by default or in the regular repositories are firmware for wireless and a few video cards. Debian even installed and worked perfectly "out-of-the-box" on my new computer with an nVidia video card. Debian's reputation for being a PITA distro is greatly exaggerated.

    @ the OP
    The best system to begin with depends on how much effort one is willing to invest in learning. If you do not mind reading documentation before being able to do things, you could start with distributions like Debian, Slackware and CentOS. If, on the other hand, you want to learn as little possible and have a working system with the least amount of work possible, then derivatives that are small modifications of their parent systems are more appropriate. To provide only a few examples: Debian-based Mepis and Saline; Slackware-based Salix. Ubuntu and Mint are more popular, but as with everything in life, popularity and quality do not always go together. The best thing to do is visit the websites of various distributions and read about each system. It is also a good idea to look at each distro's forum to see what problems users are and are not having. Download ISOs for a few of the systems that appear to meet your needs and test them one at a time. It will not take long to find the one you like most.
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  6. kashif hussain

    kashif hussain New Member

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    i want to install ubuntu ltsp server in vmware so any body plz help
    how can i install reply
  7. arochester

    arochester Active Member

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    @kashif hussain
    http://www.linux.org/threads/basic-forum-courtesy-rules-to-follow-for-all-forum-users.4688/

    Look at http://www.ubuntu.com/download/server/install-ubuntu-server . You might have to download the LTS from another place.
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  8. aprylraye

    aprylraye New Member

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    I was a beginner in Linux in my March 2013 term at Westwood College, I was a little confused, but now I want to know all I can about Linux.Well, to answer the question, I would say Fedora, Ubuntu or Linux. You have to figure out which one you like the most. for me, the jury is still out.
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  9. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    o_O
    Fedora and Ubuntu are both Linux distributions.
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  10. Videodrome

    Videodrome Active Member

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    Unless there is a distro called Linux Linux.
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  11. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    My, that would be confusing.:p
  12. CJ_7538

    CJ_7538 New Member

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    I appreciate (most) all the responses. I have downloaded linux mint and plan on downloading more to test which ones I like, that suit my needs. The laptop I'm going to use is definitely considered old/obsolete but it meets my needs. As I "troubleshoot" which version I like the most and which ones give me issues working "out of the box", I'll keep it posted. I'm excited to get started and let you know how it goes, thanks everyone!
  13. Videodrome

    Videodrome Active Member

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    I also like to do Google Image lookups or skim through YouTube videos of different distros. A google image of the desktop gives me a quick glance at what a distro is all about in addition to any images on the distros official site.

    On YouTube, I found a channel called Spatry's Cup of Linux that seems to mostly be about installing and reviewing distros.
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  14. kenizl86

    kenizl86 New Member

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    I know I've tried my fair share of the different distros, and all I can say is that it all depends on what you're looking for.

    If you want a light, simple yet highly configurable desktop environment, I'd suggest crunchbang #!. I recently installed it on my old Dell Latitude D600 laptop, and it automatically configured EVERYTHING, even up to my wireless card that I had to manually install before in Xubuntu and Backtrack.

    If you're looking for a sweet, streamlined graphical interface, Linux Mint Cinnamon is the way to go.

    If you feel that networking is where you are headed, I might suggest FreeBSD with Apache, but that's more UNIX based than Linux.

    If you feel in a hacking/cracking/enemy-racking mood, I'd suggest Backtrack.

    There's a plethora of other distros, and if you wish, this is a good place to go to get a good comparison of the various distros.

    As I said, it's all based on what you wish to go/do. Hope this helped!
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  15. Mario Caveda

    Mario Caveda New Member

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    Linux is only a kernel, the heart of the system, Fedora and Ubuntu are Linux distribution
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  16. CJ_7538

    CJ_7538 New Member

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    Ugh, I'm having issues...downloaded the Linux Mint .iso and cannot get it to install. I have been able to boot it from the USB, but that is as far as I've gotten...
  17. arochester

    arochester Active Member

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    If you can boot from a USB stick, and the laptop has no OS on it, can you choose Install from the menu?
  18. lobo

    lobo Active Member

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    I'm pretty sure that most users will be networking?

    FreeBSD is not "more UNIX based", it is a direct descendent of BSD UNIX. *BSD operating systems are not distros and are not GNU/Linux.
    Not having a clue about the hardware, as you haven't told us a thing about it, it's not easy to advise you...
  19. Videodrome

    Videodrome Active Member

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    ..... and read the Man Pages.

    lol
  20. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    In addition, the big distros and derivatives have copious documentation. Those manuals will usually have the information needed. Of course, finding the documentation and understanding it are different issues. That is where users' fora come in handy. "I am trying this, but it is not working. What am I doing wrong?"

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