Linux DNS set up

Discussion in 'Web Server' started by juliush, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. juliush

    juliush New Member

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    I've been trying to accomplish a DNS set up on my local machine using Linux and CentOS.

    I am able to ping, dig and nslookup to my example website.

    nameservers
    da.jpg

    On my Linux everything seemed to work:I can access my server and ping/nslookup/etc to the requested webpage on my created Linux server but when I'm in command line in Windows I'm unable to ping/nslookup/... ims.be and as such I'm also unable to surf to ims.be using any web browser. However when I surf to my IP address this displays the page ims.be like it should.

    When I ask (in Windows) for ipconfig -all, I realised that on my local area connection I got 3 DNS servers but I only need to access the 192.168.0.198...?
    5..jpg

    What are these 2a02:1800:100::44:1 and 2a02:1800:100::44:2 doing?


    Are they causing that I'm unable to ping to my webpage hosted on my linux?

    If yes: can I remove or shut down these 2 DNS servers?

    Or is something else causing this problem?

    Any help would really be appreciated!
  2. arochester

    arochester Super Moderator Staff Member

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  3. MikeyD

    MikeyD Active Member

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    What are you using as your DNS server? Bind? Also are your zones set up correctly? Post your full DNS server config file.
  4. SHarper

    SHarper New Member

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    Those two strange looking strings are IPv6 addresses. Probably your router or something.

    Post your DNS config and zone files.
  5. Kevin Milan

    Kevin Milan New Member

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    esolv.conf
    On Linux the DNS servers the system uses for name resolution are defined in the file:
    Code:
    /etc/resolv.conf
    Open resolv.conf with an editor like nano to make the necessary changes (if it doesn't exist already this will create the file for us):
    Code:
    sudo nano /etc/resolv.conf
  6. rstanley

    rstanley Active Member

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    I am not familiar with all Distros, and all configurations, but some at least generate the resolv.conf each time the system is booted. See the image in the original posting. On one of my Debian systems it states,
    On my other,
    Any edits to this file will disappear on the next boot.

    Please check the documentation for your Distro to see which file to edit.

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