Installing Linux Mint 14

Discussion in 'Mint' started by gordontate, Apr 13, 2013.

  1. gordontate

    gordontate New Member

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    I am trying to install Linux Mint 14 on my 300GB hard disk 3GB RAM HP laptop. I am presently running with Windows 7 but would like to try out Linux Mint 14 O/S whilst retaining Windows O/S i.e i wish to have dual booting. I am a very moderate user of the laptop but like to use open source programs.
    I have a DVD start disk for Linux from which I can boot and I want to complete the installation from the internet. The problem I have come up against is when the installation reaches the question on partitioning. I do not have a clue what answer I should give. When I read the official installation guide it seems to assume you want single boot and it devotes all the hard disk to Linux. Is there any guide that will hold my hand through the dual boot installation and if there is, is there any way it can be referred to on screen during the installation process?. Partitioning the hard disk appears to be a complicated subject unless you have an 'A' level in the subject. It bothers me that the Windows 7 installation procedure is straightforward but Linux installation seems anything but so far. No doubt the cost of a Windows installation disk has something to do with it or am I being a cynic? I would be grateful for any assistance in the subject.

  2. Jait Jacob

    Jait Jacob New Member Staff Writer

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    You are right the partition part can be very complicated and sometimes really frustrating.

    I can tell you that you have to first make some unallocated partition on your hard disk because the file system that Mint uses maybe "ext" whereas Windows uses NTFS. so first you have to Shrink the volume you plan to give to MINT from any of C,D,E drives in Windows. For that,

    Open Run from start>>>Type: diskmgmt.msc>>> a window is opened>>> select partition in which you have space and want o shrink volume of>>>after shrinking, the newly created partion maybe given name and then atlast delete the newly created patition.

    Now start with CD in your CD-ROM and restart the computer and do the OS installation.When the partition of the Hard Disk screen comes you can now select the Unallocated partition.

    Hope it helps you!

    P.S : i haven't installed MINT but i have been using RHEL and Fedora18, in both the case i do the same. If you still hav problems with the installation i will download MINT and see how we can solve the problem. I need time for that. :)
  3. gordontate

    gordontate New Member

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    Thanks Jait for your reply. It certainly seems I have to partition the HD myself before I attempt a Linux Mint install. I don't think many of the guides to Linux installation make this clear and those that do write it in language that assumes you've done the advanced course. Perhaps they should just say ' if you've found your way around Windows don't mess with Linux'.
  4. Jait Jacob

    Jait Jacob New Member Staff Writer

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    Yes! you are right. Installation guides might seem to be a bit complicated if your are not used to it. But trust me Linux is far more better than Windows. More powerful and More secure. Try learning the basics and carry on learning. Never give up! All the best. :)

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