GNU 30th Anniversary

Discussion in 'Linux Announcements' started by Rob, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. Rob

    Rob Administrator Staff Member

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    Happy Birthday GNU!

    More info: http://www.gnu.org/gnu30/

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  2. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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    GNU is a Unix-like computer operating system developed by the GNU Project. It is composed wholly of free software. It is intended to be a "complete Unix-compatible software system".

    GNU is a recursive acronym for "GNU's Not Unix!", chosen because GNU's design is Unix-like, but differs from Unix by being free software and containing no Unix code.

    Development of GNU was initiated by Richard Stallman in 1983 and was the original focus of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), but no stable release of GNU yet exists as of May 2013. Non-GNU kernels, most famously the Linux kernel, can also be used with GNU.

    Richard Stallman views GNU as a "technical means to a social end".
    The plan for the GNU operating system was publicly announced on September 27, 1983, on the net.unix-wizards and net.usoft newsgroups by Richard Stallman. Software development began on January 5, 1984, when Stallman quit his job at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Artificial Intelligence Laboratory so that they could not claim ownership or interfere with distributing GNU as free software. Richard Stallman chose the name by using various plays on words, including the song The Gnu.

    The goal was to bring a wholly free software operating system into existence. Stallman wanted computer users to be "free", as most were in the 1960s and 1970s – free to study the source code of the software they use, free to share the software with other people, free to modify the behavior of the software, and free to publish their modified versions of the software. This philosophy was later published as the GNU Manifesto in March 1985.

    Source:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU

    Source:
    http://www.gnu.org/gnu/initial-announcement.html
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