Distro - Linux Mint

Discussion in 'Beginner Tutorials' started by Rob, Jul 1, 2013.

  1. Rob

    Rob Administrator Staff Member

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    The purpose of Linux Mint is to produce a modern, elegant and comfortable operating system which is both powerful and easy to use.


    Started in 2006, Linux Mint is now the 4th most widely used home operating system behind Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS and Canonical's Ubuntu.

    Some of the reasons for the success of Linux Mint are:
    • It works out of the box, with full multimedia support and is extremely easy to use.
    • It's both free of cost and open source.
    • It's community-driven.
    • Users are encouraged to send feedback to the project so that their ideas can be used to improve Linux Mint.
    • Based on Debian and Ubuntu, it provides about 30,000 packages and one of the best software managers.It's safe and reliable.
    Thanks to a conservative approach to software updates, a unique Update Manager and the robustness of its Linux architecture, Linux Mint requires very little maintenance (no regressions, no antivirus, no anti-spyware...etc).
    Please visit: linuxmint.com
    sudlin, DevynCJohnson and Primit1v3 like this.
  2. Kovax

    Kovax Member

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    I have always been a Fedora\Red Hat guy but I may have to give Linux Mint a try. I also really like CentOS.

    Thanks
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  3. jsina

    jsina New Member

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    hi,
    Can I install Mint alongside ubuntu:
  4. Tony B

    Tony B New Member

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    @jsina: I see nobody has posted a reply to your question - yes you can install LinuxMint alongside Ubuntu.
    Last time I looked, I found Mint's step-by-step instructions very easy to follow.
    Good luck.
    JOSEPHINE SENAM ANYAH likes this.
  5. yassine

    yassine New Member

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    so for the backtrack is it use full ?
  6. ZHANG/ZHIKUN

    ZHANG/ZHIKUN New Member

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    I like debian more. Is there any new things to expect more than gnome in mint?
  7. Eddie G.

    Eddie G. New Member

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    I've toyed with Linux Mint quite a bit, as a matter of fact, when my Mom's old Dell laptop was "blue-screening" running WIndows XP, I installed this for her, and she's been using it ever since! She started with release version 15...and now they're up to 17!.....she finds using it easier than Windows!! And when you toss in the LibreOffice suite and the ability for her to save her college papers in Word formet, along with not having to pay licensig fees for Microsoft Office?...she's all set! Once again I have t tip my hat to the developers of these distros, they don't know how much they're really appreciated by the masses! here's to decades worth of releases with Linux Mint!
  8. cuellarsd

    cuellarsd New Member

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    thanks for the idea, i had not considered installing Mint on an old laptop. I'll try it this weekend
  9. cuellarsd

    cuellarsd New Member

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    I have heard good things about Mint, but I have also heard the expression, "too vanilla"
  10. ChristiW

    ChristiW Active Member

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    About 10 years ago I became interested in Linux. I had a heck of a time installing and when I Googled for answers on how to install and set up the partitioning, I was met with some very rude comments. Things like "Google it' (I did Google and where I asked the question is where Google told me to go!) or "Read the man page". Well, for a newbie that was very off putting to the whole Linux community for me. I had hear many times that Linux was better than Windows etc. But with the perception I had of the community, well, I wanted nothing to do with it.

    Then a few months ago someone was telling me they use Linux as their OS. I told him the trouble I had and a few of the responses I had when asking for help. He told me to check out Mint as it's a very good OS for those who are starting out with Linux. So, I read up here and there and when my hard drive crashed last week, I decided to do a dual boot with Windows 8.1 and Linux Mint 17.1 KDE. The experience was wonderful and I was met with kind and helpful people to explain what and how to do something.

    If you're a new person to Linux, I suggest trying Mint. (They have Cinnamon, KDE, MATE and Xfce desktops). I tried Cinnamon first but there was not enough documentation for me, so I went with KDE. I am very happy now that I will finally be able to learn and understand Linux.
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  11. Jimichan

    Jimichan New Member

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    I just set up a new computer with Cinnamon and I'm getting a little frustrated. First, I booted off a USB drive set up for persistence. It worked OK. I made a desktop icon for Firefox and made it very large so I could easily launch it from my stationary bike across the room. Every time I rebooted, it shrank and the Install icon got big.
    Well, a tech from the MB company told me a hard drive would boot faster anyway, so I installed it (it seems about the same or slower to boot, but not a problem). Now, however, I can't create an icon on the desktop! I thought I just dragged it there before, but no joy now. Is there an easy way to do this, or do I have to open a terminal, find a configuration file and do some command line stuff? I hate to spend $ on windoze, but my time is worth something ...

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