can't install from ISO disc

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by oddshoes, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. oddshoes

    oddshoes New Member

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    Hello - I finally lost it with Apple so am trying to get "linuxmint-12-gnome-cd-nocodecs-32bit.iso" to install on an old AMD Athlon 1900 machine which is currently running Win 98 sp2. Despite having made CD rom first boot device in bios it will not seem to load and keeps going to W98. I must be doing something wrong, but what? Any help would cheer me up !

  2. Bill

    Bill New Member

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    Can you try the disk in another computer? If it will not work in any computer, then you probably either have a bad download or a bad burn.

    To check the downloaded .iso, use a MD5 hash checker to compare the checksum of the .iso file and the one from the website. I believe the checksum for your .iso is supposed to be 40562d26447207cb5111f94b93957a58 . Here is one you could try. http://download.cnet.com/MD5-SHA-1-Checksum-Utility/3000-2092_4-10911445.html

    If the checksums do not match, you have a bad file and you will need to download it again. If they do match, try to burn the disk again, this time using the slowest possible speed. Also, make sure to Burn the image. It will not work if you just make a data CD.
  3. Victor Leigh

    Victor Leigh Member

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    How about trying this? Don't use any distro built on the 3.xx kernel. I think the Linux Mint 12 is built on the 3.xx kernel. Use one made from the 2.xx kernel. Go for something sure and stable like, say, Ubuntu 10.04.

    I have faced some problems like that when I tried to install Linux distros on my old laptop. I do not know what is the real incompatibility issue between the 3.xx kernel and my old hardware but I have found, through trial and error, that distros built from the 2.xx kernel work fine.

    If you want something that works fast, try Puppy Linux. I used the Slacko Puppy 5.3.3 without any problem. That's the latest distro from Puppy Linux and it has support for 3G modems, too. There is another new distro called Precise Puppy but it's built on the 3.xx kernel. I haven't tried it yet but I doubt if it would work with my old hardware.

    If you still have problems, please ask and I will see what I can share from my own experience in installing Linux on my old laptop.
  4. oddshoes

    oddshoes New Member

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    I am replying from the machine running linux mint 12. It was the data disc as opposed to disc image problem. First attempt started to load but crashed, so I tried again with a disc burned at the slowest possible speed on my mac (4X) and it worked fine. I guess the older cd drive couldn't cope with the 32X the mac had done - the disc did verify though.
    Thanks for your help. I must say I am delighted with the look and feel of the system - for the tasks I use the machine for there is no discernible difference in speed even with the 11 yr old processor.
  5. oddshoes

    oddshoes New Member

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    fixed it - I made the wrong kind of disc. Thanks for your help all the same.
  6. Victor Leigh

    Victor Leigh Member

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    Good to hear that it's running now. Are you using the Gnome interface? If you are, then give the XFCE interface a try. It's much lighter than the Gnome interface.
  7. animaguy

    animaguy New Member

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    Here is what I would do.

    I would take out the disk and shutdown the computer.

    I would start the computer and then press DEL or F12 or F1 (depending on your bios) and go to the BIOS menu.

    I would then insert the Live Linux CD.

    And there I would set the Default Settings and then I would find the Boot Menu and set boot priority to CD or DVD.

    If necessary I would set the boot priority to CD or DVD to 1st, and Floppy Disk to 2nd (even if there is no Floppy Disk Drive) and set the internal HDD to last on the priority.

    Save and Exit the Bios

    And if the Linux Mint loads I would go to Gparted and delete the existing partitions (assuming you are not duel booting). That way you no longer have to worry about the internal HDD ever booting until your Linux distro is set.

    Maybe play around with the distro before installing.

    And then install.

    Hope that helps.

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