Cannot boot into Linux Mint or Ubuntu after installing (dual-boot Windows)

Discussion in 'General Linux' started by GodsPrototype, Dec 19, 2013.

  1. Yesyesloud

    Yesyesloud Active Member

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    One could perfectly state this sentence otherwise, unskilled people install popular OSes all the time. Apart from that, this topic was created by a person who didn't seem to be a beginner at setting up an operational system, but Mint and Ubuntu do offer full instructions "for dummies" to set them up, specially alongside windows.


    Sticking the discussion to this topic... Unfortunately, a lot of multimedia drivers for home use are feature richer and often stabler in windows (Linux resounds much cleaner due to its low level hardware output capabilities though). Many proprietary video drivers are actually present in windows by default (MS-rebranded) and fully hardware-rendering capable, which doesn't happen with FOSS. Installing/updating drivers from its official proprietary releases (companies' websites/sources) is easier in Windows. A Windows setup may take over the MBR, but popular Linux distros installations respect and will only wreck it when the user is not careful enough. It's pretty basic to understand which may be installed first for multi-boot purposes; the topic owner knew it.

    The problems he experienced were solely his fault, I hope he figured that out. However he probably wasn't too familiar with *nix partition tables, he have used a Mac OS, and despite the apparently misleading MS-DOS references, he made sure on which storage devices and partitions his OSes and boot loaders were installed, guided by storage sizes. It was not hard to realize what he implied.

    Agreed. Also, as constantly mentioned, he could have placed grub in the MBR of the HDD in which only Mint was installed in order to boot it with bios shortcut keys - not ideal for most users, but it seems he would mainly run Linux for the sake of a single game.


    His disk array is rather simple. Ubuntu based distros installations are smart, they can take care of it. The main problem, here, is that he must acknowledge there were no software flaws.
  2. lobo

    lobo Active Member

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    "Unskilled people" are free to do so, but should accept that they need to read the manual and understand what they are doing - or just backup and accept the risks.

    Then such people can just use windows...?

    I know what you're getting at, but that statement is a little misleading. There is hardware rendering from the radeon and nouveau drivers and also the FOSS intel driver stack which is developed by... intel.

    A lot of noob users mess up when installing dual boot. If you've been around GNU/Linux and forums as long as I have you will have seen hundreds of threads where people mess up - and the distro is almost always Linux Mint, Ubuntu or some other "dummies" distro.

    Agreed.

    Ubuntu based distros are where most of the users have these problems (wiping out windows, installing the bootloader to the wrong place, etc).
  3. Yesyesloud

    Yesyesloud Active Member

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    Most newbies just boot the installation and follow the instructions, or even install an Ubuntu derived OS from within Windows. I believe we can't measure the success numbers. I bet they're higher than failures.


    I prefer to encourage people to adopt GNU/Linux.


    Yes... There is some hardware rendering capability in some FOSS drivers. But they're not fully capable, as in effectively taking full or at least a lot more advantage of the hardware.
  4. lobo

    lobo Active Member

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    I try to keep at least one foot in this dimension - some people are better off with windows for too many reasons to list... Windows is shit, but it often fits the average user's requirements perfectly.

    Please define "not fully capable".
  5. Yesyesloud

    Yesyesloud Active Member

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    There are nice Linux alternatives for general use, so if I know a person that can switch to Linux, considering their personal needs, I suggest it. Regardless, a dual-boot setup should be always welcome.

    From my experience with nouveau for an old GeForce 6200, 3D rendering is painfully slower than the proprietary drivers'. My laptop (Radeon HD 7640G) wouldn't even start most 3D applications with FOSS drivers. The same goes for my main desktop, containing a Radeon HD 7970. Also, there is great improvement in video playback (less frame drops and proper vsync, meaning no screan tearing at all) when the official drivers are loaded.
  6. Cyber-Berserker

    Cyber-Berserker Active Member

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    Different systems suit different people. Linux, BSD and even Windows are not suitable for everyone. I stopped using Windows, because it could not do what I needed the computer to do and open source software could. Linux is not the best choice for many people. Of course, one's needs are one factor. The other important factor is the person's personality. For example, I would not recommend Linux to someone who's line of thinking is, "Waste my time reading a manual?!!" In short, which OS to recommend depends on the person receiving the recommendation.
    Regardless of ability level? I shall only state I disagree.
    I know your answer will again be Buntu and Mint make it simple, but as lobo pointed out, most of the people with Windows dual-booting problems are using those distros. So they are not "idiot-proof."
  7. Yesyesloud

    Yesyesloud Active Member

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    Of course. I was specific as to whom I'd suggest a complete Linux switch, according to their particular needs.

    Yes, a dual-boot setup *should be always welcome (not mandatory), *regardless of the average user needs (ability level wasn't discussed at that moment), since many Linux distributions are pre-equipped to perform a few "universal" tasks better than Windows.

    I know people who became Linux users but wouldn't read manuals, I installed friendly distributions on the computers of some. Some of them set up their multi-boot systems themselves. I also know people who love learning about the OS properly, professionals mainly. Opinions on them may be divided, but all kinds of Linux users exist, some in an increasingly larger amount.

    In the quoted post, I didn't mention who would install what for whom. Whatsoever, I doubt failed newbies' dual-boot setups overcome the successful numbers. At some point, someone pointed out the topic author should be held responsible for his issues specially because he thought himself seemed to be the only one experiencing them, although the tone of the discussion changed.

    One of the main reasons I have mentioned Mint and Ubuntu several times is because they were the author's choice.

    Obvious care is always implied. I didn't give any advice in this topic without considering absolutely everything the author said, not exceeding his specific situation. I apologize if any of that was inconvenient at any extent.
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2013
  8. Ubialan

    Ubialan New Member

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    I'm finding dual booting Ubuntu and windows 8 damn near impossible. I've used easybcd, boot repair. I have an HP envy.
    I found one work around - installing Ubuntu (in legacy mode) and instead of booting directly into the boot loader (windows or grub) I boot from the boot menu in the BIOS using the notebook option which takes me to grub.

    this is not booting proper

    MY COMMENT is this:
    Don't blame Linux for the problems with dual booting this is a problem stemming from windows (which I think is deliberate) and
    If I'm going to give up on an OS IT WILL BE WINDOWS.
  9. jonnyc

    jonnyc New Member

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    Hi!
    This is my first post here, so if I err a little please bear with me.

    I'm at exactly the same place as you, hence my visit to this site.
    Most of the replies so far seem not at all helpful, most playing the "blame game"
    defensively or aggressively, with seeming objective of boosting the "screen cred"
    of the authors. I will try to be more practical.
    I have tried several Linux distros and they're all the same.
    The root of the problem is their failure to see a Windows installation in an EFI environment. ( MBR no problem.) As far as I am aware no one in the Linux community is addressing this issue, probably because they are smart and experienced enough to do workarounds. No good for the noob!
    Here is my workaround to date.
    When, from the live disc install, you have the option to format the system and install ( Linux Mint in my case), take this option. Don't panic; on the next screen
    Linux will be faced with ( in my case) three discs. Choose your intended one, i.e.not
    the one with your Windows installation.
    When it has finished installing it will appear that you have lost your Windows.
    NOT SO!
    To boot into Windows access the boot menu when the BIOS screen appears ( F8
    on my machine) and select the windows disc. Now you're back in your old
    familiar environment. From there you can re-run your Easy BCD and configure
    the Windows bootloader to boot into Windows. When you want to boot into Linux
    use the above F8 workaround. You now have a homespun "sorta dual boot"
    capability, which is where I am right now.

    NOW! Is there any bright spark there who can tell me how to acheive the
    dual boot capability I want using Easy BCD? I'm sure it will be in the program's
    literature somewhere, but any shortening of the learning curve would be much appreciated.
  10. blackneos940

    blackneos940 Active Member

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    I..... I was going to help, but I can see you guys have the bases covered..... :D ON TO THE NEXT QUESTION!!..... ^^
  11. jonnyc

    jonnyc New Member

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    Well! I stand corrected. I just installed Fedora, and it DID notice my Win 7 installation and gave me a boot option on start up. So the failure to spot the Win
    install is not a generic Linux problem, but specific to Mint, Ubuntu and ....... I
    forget the other distro I tried. Need to go away and consider...... If I discover
    anything helpful I'll post it here.
  12. workhorse

    workhorse New Member

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    Well, I actually had the same problem on my computer and i was perfectly able (after a few reinstalls) to get linux booting. There are some awesome tools out there to help the user complete a successful install. It just takes patience and plenty of reading. This is coming from someone who has used the "dummy proof" versions and has dual booted linux alongside multiple versions of Windows.

    That being said, I've had too many issues with Windows update that i decided to format my entire hard drive to include All recovery partitions from Windows 8. A clean install from linux mint on a thumbdrive led to a non booting grub recovery. I could access the distro through the access menu on my thumbdrive (used pendrive linux to boot multiple isos/recovery options).

    Using yhe live cd i ended up having to do was create the /boot partition first, then creating the /, /home and swap partitions. When selecting where to put the boot from i chose /boot. This created all the partitions great. But, use the live cd one more time and do the boot repair options now.

    Do it in this order and at the next login youll be able to load kinux from the grub2 screen at comouter startup. I kept creating the /boot after the partitions were already made and it was giving the same problem.

    From now on windows can be loaded into a vm. No more booting from startup. Much thanks to Yesyesloud. Hope this helps others with this problem.
    blackneos940 likes this.

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