Backtrack5 r3 kde

Discussion in 'Laptops / Netbooks' started by Tjmole, Dec 19, 2013.

  1. Tjmole

    Tjmole New Member

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    image.jpg I'm a fairly new linux user and am usually an advocate for solving ones owns problems although for this one I truly baffled. I'm sure the solution is fairly obvious and I'm just being too oblivious to it so I appreciate you putting up with me.

    I recently purchased an Acer aspire m5 laptop and have been trying to successfully boot from a live usb drive with a copy of btr5 r3 kde 32 bit. I've also tried it with the 64 bit but got the same error. I'm able to load the linux boot menu but none of the Casper files can successfully load. As of now I've tried running it in legacy and uefi; same results. I've tried both ahci and raid; neither work and the men test included in bt won't even run it. Any thoughts anyone?


    Acer aspire m5
    Intel core i7 4500u
    1.8 ghz
    8g ram
    1tb
    And I used lili live usb creator to burn an iso to a sandisk cruzer.
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  2. arochester

    arochester Well-Known Member

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    USB sticks can be suspect.

    You do install 1 and everything is OK. You try install 2, but "bits" of install 1 get left behind. Therefore, install 2 does not work.

    ALWAYS format your USB stick in between installs to make sure "bits" are not left behind.
  3. Tjmole

    Tjmole New Member

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    I'll try that but I originally used two seperate usb drives for each one. Moreover I used window diskpart to remove any resonance of past bits. I also can tell based on your response I was too blunt in what said; I'm new to linux but I have a fairly good mechanical operations of a computer.

    Diskpart
    Select disk 1
    Clean
    Create partition primary
    Select partition 1
    Format fs=fat32 quick
    Assign
    Exit

    Then I ran lili usb creator although I guess I could try this from a linux based system. I should also mention I have an old asus net book with an intel atom processor(32 bit) and it succefully ran both versions. Although I still don't know how it took the 64 bit I'm assuming it was just the intuition of the creators.
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2013
  4. DevynCJohnson

    DevynCJohnson Well-Known Member Staff Member Staff Writer

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  5. Tjmole

    Tjmole New Member

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    Sorry my last post is pretty outdated, I already solved that problem with kali linux. My problem right now is I can't get it to recognize my wireless card. I already installed wicd and I updated my iwlwifi firmware through a cable connection. It still persists even with this update. Any suggestions?

    I have an acer aspire m-5 with an internal intel 7260 wireless card and 64 bit kali linux on a live usb with persistence

    Apt-get install wicd
    Apt-get upgrade firmware-iwlwifi
    Dmesg|tail
    Lspci
    Grep -i wireless

    And here's the results from some of the commands: image.jpg
    I'll have to find the screenshots from lspci and Grep -I wireless
    But lspci listed it as a network controller.
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  6. lobo

    lobo Active Member

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    Please read this thread: http://www.linux.org/threads/backtrack-kali.5286/

    And please don't take this the wrong way, but based on your posts, we can tell a lot about your skill level.

    kali is not for inexperienced users, it's a distro specifically tailored for pentesting. If you're not planning on pentesting, then you don't need it. If you are, then you probably have some learning to do before you get to that stage. To achieve this you should install a regular distro and work up from there. kali is based on Debian, so you could try Debian or one of the easier derivatives as a starting point.

    As to the problem, I 'd suspect that the new laptop has USB 3.0 ports? It could be that your kernel is too old. To find out the kernel release:

    Code:
    $ uname -a
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
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