1st time with linux/Ubuntu 14.04

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by NoobUser, Jun 26, 2014.

  1. NoobUser

    NoobUser New Member

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    So, i want to move away from MS and installed Ubuntu, OS is running ok but i am getting frustrated with a couple of thing that i believe linux should improve.


    1: User interface, not easy to setup thing the way you like it, I dont know how too see all the installed software
    2: Installing programs, for me the worthy thing ever, i am trying to install TOR, but i fail to see how, i dont understand the codes, and i dont find it user friendly at all, REMOVE the need of using code lines
    3: Folders/programs, i have no idea where the stuff goes

    But i am not still giving up, but many users will just leave Ubuntu the 1st time that they need to use or understand codes
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2014
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  2. NoobUser

    NoobUser New Member

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    i have installed TOR without need of codes, you just need to change comportment from that particular script, i dont know why they didnt make it default.

    I am getting used to ubuntu interface and starting to enjoy it.
    For now, i am searching about on how to configure linux to my WHS 2011, sharing folders linux/windows etc, if i get this done, i guess i will probably make ubuntu main OS on all computers here.

    ps: I am considering to install ubuntu for my tablet (x86), any recommended district that is touch, i think ubuntu for tablets is not ready yet
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2014
  3. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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    Linux has one of the greatest assets of any system IE choice.

    Ubuntu uses the Unity desktop by default, some love it, others hate it. I personally enjoy it very much. But it is not for everyone. If you are used to Windows, consider using Kubuntu (Ubuntu with the KDE desktop) which has a more standard (windows like) setup.

    There are two main ways to install software on Ubuntu (there are more but two default). The first is with the use of PPAs. A PPA is like a software catalog. If you add it to your system apt will be able to install (and upgrade) software from that PPA. Similar to PPAs are the repositories which are generally for system software and some other packages that are not in PPAs.

    The other main way to install software on Ubuntu is through .deb files. These are package files that act like .exe install files on Windows. However, you must open them either with the package manager, dpkg, or with a package manger front end like Gdebi.

    There are front end programs that can replace the Command line tools you are using. You should install these on Ubuntu (why they are not default I still don't know).
    1. Synaptic - a program that provides a front end for apt-get. To install the program:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install synaptic
    Once this is installed you will never need to use the apt-get command again (most of the time).

    synaptic.png
    2. Gdebi - a front end for Apt-get and Dpkg that will install .deb files to install gdebi open synaptic package manager and search for gdebi. Once you find it right click the entry and select Mark for Installation. Now simply click the apply button and gdebi will be installed.
    gdebi.png

    3. Y-ppa manger - this program provides a front end for add-apt-repository and can even search, remove, and install all software from PPAs. To install y-ppa manager;
    Code:
    sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/y-ppa-manager
    Then open synaptic and search for y-ppa-manager and follow the instructions above to install.
    yppamanager.png
    4. Ubuntu software center - this is a software installation program. You can use it to search for, install, and purchase software. It is installed by default on Ubuntu.

    5. Software & Updates -this is a repository, drivers, and repository mirror manager that allows you to enable/disable/add software repositories to your system. It is preinstalled with Ubuntu.

    Now for the filesystem. Linux uses a Unix like filesystem. The only folder you really need to worry about is /home/YOUR_USER_NAME where your user account files are stored. IE your pictures, music, documents, videos etc are stored here. Everywhere else on the system is for the OS and most normal users do not need to mess around there. However, if you want to learn more about the Linux filesystem, take a look here:
    http://www.linux.org/threads/filesystem-article-index.6028/


    So, if you were to follow these instructions to install TOR on Ubuntu:
    https://www.torproject.org/docs/debian.html.en
    First you would open Sofware & Updates. From there you would click Other Software --> Add...
    There you enter
    Code:
    deb    http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org Trusty main
    
    Unfortunately there is no gpg front end program so these two command would be in a terminal:
    Code:
    sudo gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv 886DDD89
    Code:
    sudo gpg --export A3C4F0F979CAA22CDBA8F512EE8CBC9E886DDD89 | sudo apt-key add -
    with that done just open synaptic and click refresh the sofware lists update and you can search for and install TOR

    TOR is not a good example of how to install sofware without using the command line. Almost all other sofware can be installed via just y-ppa-manager and synaptic.

    This system may seem confusing but in the long run it is very efficient. Generally this is because the software on your system is managed by the package manager, apt, and when you update your system, it will update your software too. (if an update is available).

    By the way. These failings are of Ubuntu. IE other Linux distributions have more gui front ends for their programs. (some arguably better then others. ) Most Linux users install extra front-end programs like synaptic, gdebi, y-ppa-manager and others. Still, some advanced users prefer the command line since is is faster and provides better responses.

    I do agree with you though. It would be nice if Canonical would improve their package management system. A better Software Center, synaptic installed by default, and a ppa manager by default would be awesome.

    Last edited: Jun 26, 2014
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  4. NoobUser

    NoobUser New Member

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    ty for nice and very detailed reply, i am looking into it and learn from it, very helpfull
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  5. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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    If you have any other questions or problems, please let us know. :)
  6. Falcao

    Falcao New Member

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    @NoobUser,

    give it time enough and i promise you will love to use Terminal even having the option of not doing so! Just takes some time before you realize its advantages! Lets wait and see.. ;D

    As Ryanvade said, there are some options and is perfectly possible to install programs right out of the box from official repositories whithout using terminal! Pretty much like one would do on his Android or IOS Smartphone! Look for “Ubuntu Software Center” and you can easily install packages (software).

    You may also try Linux Mint Cinnamon Edition (currently on version 17 Qiana) which IMHO is even more close to Windows interface than KDE.

    Cheers
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  7. NoobUser

    NoobUser New Member

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    Best Answer
    i have installed TOR without need of codes, you just need to change comportment from that particular script, i dont know why they didnt make it default.

    I am getting used to ubuntu interface and starting to enjoy it.
    For now, i am searching about on how to configure linux to my WHS 2011, sharing folders linux/windows etc, if i get this done, i guess i will probably make ubuntu main OS on all computers here.

    ps: I am considering to install ubuntu for my tablet (x86), any recommended district that is touch, i think ubuntu for tablets is not ready yet
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2014
  8. Jim Laughlan

    Jim Laughlan Active Member

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  9. NoobUser

    NoobUser New Member

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    loved that site, ty

    I have a question, does Linux have email equivalent like MS hotmail?
  10. Jim Laughlan

    Jim Laughlan Active Member

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    Unfortunately no. My suggestion is to consider your own domain name and e-mail service with go daddy or something like that. It's practically peanuts. Also I suggest using Thunderbird for an e-mail client and install ENIGMAIL so you can encrypt emails using Open PGP. Very handy to have nowadays.
  11. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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    If you support the Linux foundation, you receive an @linux.com email address. But like I mentioned before Linux is about choice. Having a prefered email service is a bit backwards in this respect. It does not matter what OS you have when it comes to email addresses. I have a gmail, hotmail, linux.com, and siue.edu (school) accounts and access them all via thunderbird mail. kmail works great too.
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  12. NoobUser

    NoobUser New Member

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    So, i am enjoying much the ubuntu, that i had setup my second machine with it and i am considering ubuntu server over my whs 2011 since i am facing troubles at sharing folder windows/linux (so far i fail at accessing both sides)
    Only one machine will be still on windows, my gaming one (sadly :( )

    So, now i have my media pc with linux, and my work labtop with linux, i want also to install ubuntu tablet but seems its not ready yet.

    Software that i use as my windows equivalent:
    SMPLAYER (to replace bs player), it auto search subtitles
    qBittorrent (very similar to bitcommet)
    Thunderbird (insted of windows mail)
    GIMP (similar to fotoshop)
    TOR

    I can see now how useful the terminal can be, but the "app store" is also great to use instead.
  13. Jim Laughlan

    Jim Laughlan Active Member

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    Make sure you have SAMBA installed for the windows/linux sharing and check your firewall on both machines to make sure the ports 137,138, 139 and 445 are open.

    Service/Port/protocol

    DNS/53/tcp_udp
    Kerberos/88/tcp_udp
    End Point Mapper (DCE/RPC Locator Service)/135/tcp
    NetBIOS Name Service/137/udp
    NetBIOS Datagram/138/udp
    NetBIOS Session/139/tcp
    LDAP/389/tcp_udp
    SMB over TCP/445/tcp
    Kerberos kpasswd/464/tcp_udp
    LDAPS (only if "tls enabled = yes")/636/tcp
    Dynamic RPC Ports*/1024-5000/tcp
    Global Cataloge/3268/tcp
    Global Cataloge SSL (only if "tls enabled = yes")/3269/tcp
    Multicast DNS/5353/tcp_udp
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  14. ryanvade

    ryanvade Administrator Staff Member Staff Writer

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  15. NoobUser

    NoobUser New Member

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    Today i have setup the 1st ubuntu system at eurosport Portugal office for general use

    [​IMG]
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